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Author Topic: Advice on lenses  (Read 13332 times)

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« Reply #25 on: January 25, 2014, 09:51 »
0
You are missing the point, and I think you do it deliberately. I have a Danish mate, same character, just being stubborn for the sake of it.
It is deliberate, yes, Im trying to educate some business sence into you.
Its not easy since Im up against love for equipment and collection tendencies, not to mention that photographers can only look at the world through a viewfinder.

Im trying to express a broader view of things. From the microstock business side.
Microstock is NOT all about photos, and certainly not lenses, but more about relevant content, metadata and trend and distribution.
And I have not found the stone of wisdom, What I say is only part of the truth. Good lenses matter. But not as much as you guys think, and i think it is poor advice to give to a guy with an old DLSR, to begin to invest in lenses, he should rather get a camara, a kitlens, and spend his time on photoshop.

if we are going that "extreme" perhaps he doesn't even need to learn Photoshop (BTW I mainly use GIMP), I guess he can upload stuff straight from the camera without any editing, if that is the microstock you want to approach that is fine but please don't advice a 18-200 lens to start with, get a 50mm and use your feet ;)


Ron

« Reply #26 on: January 25, 2014, 09:55 »
0
I bought a 50-250mm canon because I could afford it. At some point it was holding me back, in fact, I never used it again. I lent it to a friend of mine and I will probably never see it again. I invested in one quality fast lens and I love it to date, best investment I ever made (besides my 6D)

« Reply #27 on: January 25, 2014, 10:57 »
0
Well, I owned 3 18-200, and gave them away, because I upgraded to full frame.

I would still recommend it for stock.

« Reply #28 on: January 25, 2014, 11:07 »
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I would be interested to know what the OP decided - since he started this thread on 6th January.


« Reply #29 on: January 25, 2014, 11:22 »
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I have a Nikon D50. I understand cheap glass isn't as good, but I am sure there are alternatives that don't suffer too much. I haven't decided on any just yet. I am just looking for good AF lenses that allow the most light in. I am a sucker for shallow depth of field with a nice bokeh. My current manual  lenses can achieve this with my current lenses, but manual can be hit or miss with focus sometimes. My 18-55mm stock lens just doesn't let enough light in for my liking (f3.x)

« Reply #30 on: January 25, 2014, 11:55 »
0
BTW I have a degree in computer graphics (specifically animation) and I am trained in studio Photography. I am a developer in my day job, so I know the equipment and software well. I know what U want in a lens, however, I don't have the funds to spend on the equipment that my employers have. I used to have access to a variety of high- end lenses with my past employer, but now I have to rely on my own equipment.

Stock is a side thing I do to supplement my income along with freelance work. Most of my portfolio is CG and I make the most from animations. I want to bump my returns by using my studio photography experience.

Anyway with that said, I am looking for decent quality at a good price. I do enjoy the manual lenses, but I feel I can become speedier if I had AF

« Reply #31 on: January 25, 2014, 11:55 »
+1
I am a sucker for shallow depth of field with a nice bokeh.


Me too.

Apparently your D50 has an internal focus motor and is therefore compatible with AF-D lenses. So the AF Nikkor 50mm f/1.8D should suit you very well. You should be able to get one new for $100 - $150.

It's affordable but also a classic (as is the Canon equivalent).

« Reply #32 on: January 25, 2014, 11:59 »
0
I forgot to say thanks guys I do appreciate the advice

« Reply #33 on: January 25, 2014, 12:03 »
+1
BTW. Old DLSRs are not competitive anymore.

Actually I would advice the OP to get a new camera and not a lens.

BS I get great shots from my D50 still. Sure I'd love an upgrade, but not a necessity

« Reply #34 on: January 25, 2014, 12:20 »
0
BTW. Old DLSRs are not competitive anymore.

Actually I would advice the OP to get a new camera and not a lens.


BS I get great shots from my D50 still. Sure I'd love an upgrade, but not a necessity


I started out in 2007 in stock with a d 50, and it is problematic, because there is not much to crop from with 6,1 mpix.
Also my version was a noise monster. Maybe yours arent, and maybe not in the studio.
I would still recomend the 18-200 because:

CONTRA:
It has vignette
It is very not sharp at 18-22 and 170-200.
It has heavy cromatic abbrevation in some situations
People laugh at you, and you loose street respect among photographers

PRO
It is cheap
It is reasonably sharp in the range from 22-170
It can produce tack sharp pictures
AF is fast, and precise.
It has VR that compensates for ever so much camera shake, but not motion blur.
It can be handheld at 1/60 or even 1/30 at 200 mm and get sharp images.
the close range is good, and it is close to becoming a macro.
It is very versatile, and you can photograph everything with it. Landscapes, portraits, product and wildlife.

of my stock port is done with that lens and a d 200, of which I have also had 3, since i upgraded to a new d 200 every time I dropped the set on the floor and broke it.

http://www.shutterstock.com/gallery-88729p2.html?sort_method=newest&safesearch=1

Goofy

« Reply #35 on: January 25, 2014, 12:38 »
+1
In summary,

Remember that you're shooting images that net around $.60 (USD) thus keep the equipment (camera, lens, computer, software) in ratio with your earnings (present and future).

Thus buying a Hasselbald MF camera with Zeiss lens makes no sense for the vast majority of us. Heck even the Nikon D800e with Zeiss glass makes no sense. Just keep it in perspective. I started with a Canon T2i Rebel with a 28-135 lens for my first year. Later on got a 50mm and 24-70 lens but not until I had built up a base salary to justify the purchases...

 ;)


« Reply #36 on: January 25, 2014, 12:53 »
0
That is a good summary.
And I remembered that I have a lens for sale cheaply, like you can have it, if you come and get it and bring a couple of beers.

Ninor AF 85 mm, 1,8
Almost mint condition, works perfectly.

« Reply #37 on: January 25, 2014, 13:07 »
0
Dingles,  I see nothing wrong with wanting to stick with your D50 for now as you start out, it's a fine camera.  After 11 years in the photography business, I've just started contributing to Microstock this past year and have been uploading images from my back catalogue from older cameras including a D50 (which I still own) and  an even older D100.    I'm happy to report that images made with these cameras are being accepted and selling.

As for a fast lens, in 2003 I bought a used 50mm F1.8 lens for about $85 and it was a workhorse for me until I sold it 2013 on ebay for $75.  I'd say it's the best 10 bucks I ever spent, but in truth it paid for it self more times than I count.  I recommend it for your D50. 

« Reply #38 on: January 25, 2014, 13:50 »
0
BTW. Old DLSRs are not competitive anymore.

Actually I would advice the OP to get a new camera and not a lens.


BS I get great shots from my D50 still. Sure I'd love an upgrade, but not a necessity


I started out in 2007 in stock with a d 50, and it is problematic, because there is not much to crop from with 6,1 mpix.
Also my version was a noise monster. Maybe yours arent, and maybe not in the studio.
I would still recomend the 18-200 because:

CONTRA:
It has vignette
It is very not sharp at 18-22 and 170-200.
It has heavy cromatic abbrevation in some situations
People laugh at you, and you loose street respect among photographers

PRO
It is cheap
It is reasonably sharp in the range from 22-170
It can produce tack sharp pictures
AF is fast, and precise.
It has VR that compensates for ever so much camera shake, but not motion blur.
It can be handheld at 1/60 or even 1/30 at 200 mm and get sharp images.
the close range is good, and it is close to becoming a macro.
It is very versatile, and you can photograph everything with it. Landscapes, portraits, product and wildlife.

of my stock port is done with that lens and a d 200, of which I have also had 3, since i upgraded to a new d 200 every time I dropped the set on the floor and broke it.

http://www.shutterstock.com/gallery-88729p2.html?sort_method=newest&safesearch=1


I have no issue with noise as long as I keep the ISO in check. Never had much vignette issues (although I often add vignette in post...must be the artist in me). Never had issues with Chromatic Abrasion either...at least nothing noticeable. I personally like a bit of imperfection in my photos, except when doing studio shots. Even though it may be cheap now, it was not a cheap camera in 2007 :)...

« Reply #39 on: January 25, 2014, 13:54 »
0
the nikon d 50 cost 1000 dollars back in 2005.

« Reply #40 on: January 25, 2014, 13:55 »
0
Dingles,  I see nothing wrong with wanting to stick with your D50 for now as you start out, it's a fine camera.  After 11 years in the photography business, I've just started contributing to Microstock this past year and have been uploading images from my back catalogue from older cameras including a D50 (which I still own) and  an even older D100.    I'm happy to report that images made with these cameras are being accepted and selling.

As for a fast lens, in 2003 I bought a used 50mm F1.8 lens for about $85 and it was a workhorse for me until I sold it 2013 on ebay for $75.  I'd say it's the best 10 bucks I ever spent, but in truth it paid for it self more times than I count.  I recommend it for your D50.

Thanks for the advice man, I guess the good thing about lenses is they really don't loss much value. I think I'm going for a AF-D 50mm 1.8 for now. I'll stick with my manual 70-210mm lens for now. An 85mm 1.8 sounds like fun also. I guss in short there really aren't many off-brands for Nikon lenses and I don't want to mess with adapter mounts for AF.

« Reply #41 on: January 25, 2014, 13:58 »
0
the nikon d 50 cost 1000 dollars back in 2005.

I spend around $800 in 2005, but that isn't cheap for me...but it is all relative. I was thinking of upgrading since I only need the body and would love to add HD video to the mix. I saw some Nikons running around 4 and up. One thing I do not like about some of the new nikons is the lack of the digital display on top...looks like they all expect you to use live view in the LCD now...good for focus, but a pain for checking settings.

« Reply #42 on: January 25, 2014, 14:04 »
0
The only possible downside of buying the 50 mm AF-D version of the f/1.8 is the issue of its compatibility with cameras which you might own in the future. For example - if your D50 ever fails you might want to replace it with, say, a D3100, D3200 or similar lower end Nikon.

The AF-S NIKKOR
50mm f/1.8G
will work with all Nikon DSLRs. It might be worth spending the extra money.

« Reply #43 on: January 25, 2014, 14:08 »
0
The only possible downside of buying the 50 mm AF-D version of the f/1.8 is the issue of its compatibility with cameras which you might own in the future. For example - if your D50 ever fails you might want to replace it with, say, a D3100, D3200 or similar lower end Nikon.

The AF-S NIKKOR
50mm f/1.8G
will work with all Nikon DSLRs. It might be worth spending the extra money.


Thanks that is good to keep in mind.

« Reply #44 on: January 25, 2014, 14:14 »
0
the nikon d 50 cost 1000 dollars back in 2005.

I spend around $800 in 2005, but that isn't cheap for me...but it is all relative. I was thinking of upgrading since I only need the body and would love to add HD video to the mix. I saw some Nikons running around 4 and up. One thing I do not like about some of the new nikons is the lack of the digital display on top...looks like they all expect you to use live view in the LCD now...good for focus, but a pain for checking settings.
Im in Europe. But that was with the kitlens 18-55, and despite what people say it was a good lens.

« Reply #45 on: January 25, 2014, 15:57 »
0
the nikon d 50 cost 1000 dollars back in 2005.

I spend around $800 in 2005, but that isn't cheap for me...but it is all relative. I was thinking of upgrading since I only need the body and would love to add HD video to the mix. I saw some Nikons running around 4 and up. One thing I do not like about some of the new nikons is the lack of the digital display on top...looks like they all expect you to use live view in the LCD now...good for focus, but a pain for checking settings.
Im in Europe. But that was with the kitlens 18-55, and despite what people say it was a good lens.

I hear ya. The 18-55mm lens is great. I use it all the time.

« Reply #46 on: January 28, 2014, 09:30 »
0
But now, can anybody tell me WHEN exactly fast lenses are important?

The ability to focus in low light conditions can be useful. For me it is. I like to shoot in a low lit studio environment.

« Reply #47 on: January 28, 2014, 09:57 »
0
But now, can anybody tell me WHEN exactly fast lenses are important?

The ability to focus in low light conditions can be useful. For me it is. I like to shoot in a low lit studio environment.

That is actually a valid argument.
Funny thing is that my best lens, has problems with focusing in semi dark conditions and then I just turn on a lamp or the pilot lights.
But thats a different story.

« Reply #48 on: January 28, 2014, 10:26 »
+1
Since aperture selection greatly impacts the Depth of Field and therefore the overall appearance of the resulting image, fast lenses also provide the photographer with more creative control than slower lenses - in addition to low light performance.

I'm not saying that everyone needs an arsenal of fast glass, but a 50mm 1.8 is so inexpensive and offers so much in that regard, I would recommend one to anyone.         

« Reply #49 on: January 28, 2014, 10:39 »
0
There I disagree to a degree, first I have a 50mm 1.8, and I never use it, because it cannot zoom, it is inconvenient to work with.

The agencies, and the customers dont like shallow dof. Shallow dof is a technology based artefact that we try to avoid with: Stacking, aperture, light, and sensors so big that you can crop.
If you are not convinced then google model railway images and tilt shift lenses and compare.

It is only sometimes that shallow DOF is expressive  There are many examples, that a blurred background adds to the subject. They are standard in Yuris lifestyle pictures. A blurred light background fading into white. It is subjec and style specific and has a lot to do with the kind of the picture language we are used to.


 

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