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Author Topic: Going to mirror less  (Read 10429 times)

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« on: October 20, 2014, 15:42 »
0
Hey guys,

I would like to know what do you think about this kind of move...

This guy sell all his nikon gear and go to mirror less sony gear, he 10 good reason, do you have any more?

Or what are you reasons not to go that way.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7wM_5nROeaw

Cheers!


« Reply #1 on: October 20, 2014, 15:55 »
+1
I didn't even watch what he had to say because I've made a similar decision. I'll probably go the Panasonic/Olympus route with a couple of micro 4/3 cameras.

« Reply #2 on: October 20, 2014, 17:10 »
+1
Bought the Olympus EM1 and never looked back!

« Reply #3 on: October 20, 2014, 17:33 »
0
bought a E PL1  3 YEARS AGO . Great camera!

« Reply #4 on: October 20, 2014, 18:09 »
+1
I'm not yet convinced that todays mirror less will do good captures of speed race boats coming around a corner at 120 mph.  That was my last shoot. For still and slow movements it seems they can do well.

« Reply #5 on: October 20, 2014, 19:21 »
0

I'm not yet convinced that todays mirror less will do good captures of speed race boats coming around a corner at 120 mph.  That was my last shoot. For still and slow movements it seems they can do well.

Well, in the reviews that I saw of the sony a6000, I can't see how it couldn't take that kind of shot. 11 shot per second in raw and Aspc sensor.

« Reply #6 on: October 20, 2014, 19:22 »
0
I'm going to check that references, but I'm very interested in the a6000.

« Reply #7 on: October 20, 2014, 19:33 »
+1

I'm not yet convinced that todays mirror less will do good captures of speed race boats coming around a corner at 120 mph.  That was my last shoot. For still and slow movements it seems they can do well.

Well, in the reviews that I saw of the sony a6000, I can't see how it couldn't take that kind of shot. 11 shot per second in raw and Aspc sensor.
Focus tracking at speed was the main concern. 11 FPS sounds good though!

« Reply #8 on: October 20, 2014, 22:52 »
0
I'm not yet convinced that todays mirror less will do good captures of speed race boats coming around a corner at 120 mph.  That was my last shoot. For still and slow movements it seems they can do well.
Have a look at the Nikon 1 V3

« Reply #9 on: October 20, 2014, 23:26 »
+1
I'm VERY excited to try out the Samsung NX-1 when it comes out next month. I haven't really been tempted by mirrorless before the NX-1, but these specs have me looking:
  • 28.2 megapixel backlit sensor
  • 15 fps burst
  • 205 phase-detect points covering 90% of the frame
  • Weather-resistant magnesium alloy body
  • 4K video
  • 100% viewfinder coverage
  • 1/250 sec flash sync

And it's only $1,500USD body only

« Reply #10 on: October 21, 2014, 04:37 »
+3
I've little doubt that mirrorless is the way forward - the mirror is only an inconvenience put there to allow you to see what the lens sees, anyway, so if there is a better way of solving that problem than having a cluncky, heavy, mirror box then it's bound to win. I'll probably switch next time I buy a camera, maybe a couple of years from now. That will give time for a wider range of models to become available and for any issues with viewfinder lag to be overcome and for many more (probably superfluous) bells and whistles to be added.

Dook

« Reply #11 on: October 21, 2014, 05:06 »
+1
I've little doubt that mirrorless is the way forward - the mirror is only an inconvenience put there to allow you to see what the lens sees, anyway, so if there is a better way of solving that problem than having a cluncky, heavy, mirror box then it's bound to win. I'll probably switch next time I buy a camera, maybe a couple of years from now. That will give time for a wider range of models to become available and for any issues with viewfinder lag to be overcome and for many more (probably superfluous) bells and whistles to be added.
+1
But, I read that Fuji XT-1 and Fuji X100T have new improved EVF that are up to OVF quality. I'll have to check these cameras, it sounds promising.

PaulieWalnuts

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« Reply #12 on: October 21, 2014, 05:13 »
+2
Didn't watch the video but I'd say the DSLR is going to become a niche camera over the next few years. Mirrorless has caught up and even are better in some cases than DSLRs. Pro sports will probably always have pro DSLRs. Everything below the pro level will eventually get replaced by mirrorless.

I shoot mostly travel and cityscapes. I've been using an NEX-7 for the past couple of years and it's great. My 5DMII and bag of lenses are collecting dust. I also use a D800 but probably not for much longer. My new system will be a Sony A7R and A6000 with three lenses. The DSLR stuff will probably go on Ebay.

Small and light. Only needs a small bag and small lightweight travel tripod. So much nicer to carry and shoot with. Easier to take on a plane. I blend in as a tourist instead of looking like Paparazzi with the giant DSLR and lens. Sony, Fuji, Olympus and even Samsung are making some pretty interesting new cameras.

Plus I think a lot of amateurs use DSLRs because thats what pros use and if they want to be taken seriously then they must get a DSLR. It looks like a lot of pros are ditching their DSLRs for mirrorless. When it becomes common to see pros using mirrorless then amateurs will follow. 

Most of my best pictures were taken with the NEX-7.

« Reply #13 on: October 21, 2014, 06:17 »
0
I can see that there are lots of advantages of mirrorless.
How is battery life with these? I have doubts about that as the sensor, processor and lcd/evf have to be working all the time when you compose and change settings.
When traveling with my DSLR I'm sometimes on the same battery for several days. I love it that the camera doesn't even have to be tuned on to look in the viewfinder and check how a scene looks through your lens.
Anyway, with the reduced weight and price of using a mirrorless you can afford to carry a few extra batteries.

And what about lens selection?
If there would be full frame mirrorless which I can use with all EF lenses I would try that.
But as I see, Sony's lens selection is getting better.

« Reply #14 on: October 21, 2014, 09:02 »
0
I can see that there are lots of advantages of mirrorless.
How is battery life with these? I have doubts about that as the sensor, processor and lcd/evf have to be working all the time when you compose and change settings.
When traveling with my DSLR I'm sometimes on the same battery for several days. I love it that the camera doesn't even have to be tuned on to look in the viewfinder and check how a scene looks through your lens.
Anyway, with the reduced weight and price of using a mirrorless you can afford to carry a few extra batteries.

And what about lens selection?
If there would be full frame mirrorless which I can use with all EF lenses I would try that.
But as I see, Sony's lens selection is getting better.

Some mirrorless cameras can be used with EF and other SLR lenses via an adapter, but you presumably lose autofocus so the EF lens needs to be one with a decent focusing ring.  Because there is no mirror the mount to sensor distance is shorter than on an SLR, which means there is always room for adapter to mount SLR lenses.

« Reply #15 on: October 21, 2014, 10:40 »
0
Actually Metabones make an EF to E-mount adapter with autofocus:
http://www.metabones.com/products/details/MB-EF-E-BM4

Uncle Pete

« Reply #16 on: October 21, 2014, 11:22 »
+1
Probably won't be a Nikon full frame.  ;)

http://news.softpedia.com/news/Nikon-Says-Nay-to-Mirrorless-Camera-with-Large-Sensors-459637.shtml

"The photo gear maker also points out the advantages DSLR cameras bring to the table, including improved AF speed, tracking and a reliable life cycle."

Samsung NX1 28.2 MP Wireless SMART Compact System Camera with 16-50mm f/2.0-2.8 "S" Lens $2,800 and it looks pretty. Available now.

I have the EOS-M and I'm happy with a little APS-C just what I wanted. (note not Needed)

It will be interesting to watch the mirror-less technology and market develop. I'm happy with DSLRs for what I shoot, which means I won't be making a change until I see some distinct advantage. Buying new lenses and a body, spending money for new technology, aren't an advantage right now.  8)


« Reply #17 on: October 23, 2014, 10:57 »
0
Just found that there is also a cheaper EF to E mount adapter than the Metabones:

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/111405519095?clk_rvr_id=718640243540

« Reply #18 on: October 23, 2014, 18:59 »
+2
Probably won't be a Nikon full frame.  ;)

"The photo gear maker also points out the advantages DSLR cameras bring to the table, including improved AF speed, tracking and a reliable life cycle."

Advantages that wouldn't apply if Nikon would invest in improving mirrorless cameras' AF speed, tracking and reliable life cycles.

That quote actually reminds me of the long-forgotten British camera manufacturer, Ensign, who believed in the advantage of folding 120 rollfilm cameras over 35mm right up to when their market disappeared around the time the Nikon F1 appeared.
« Last Edit: October 23, 2014, 19:02 by BaldricksTrousers »

PaulieWalnuts

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« Reply #19 on: October 23, 2014, 19:33 »
+2
Probably won't be a Nikon full frame.  ;)

http://news.softpedia.com/news/Nikon-Says-Nay-to-Mirrorless-Camera-with-Large-Sensors-459637.shtml

"The photo gear maker also points out the advantages DSLR cameras bring to the table, including improved AF speed, tracking and a reliable life cycle."

Samsung NX1 28.2 MP Wireless SMART Compact System Camera with 16-50mm f/2.0-2.8 "S" Lens $2,800 and it looks pretty. Available now.

I have the EOS-M and I'm happy with a little APS-C just what I wanted. (note not Needed)

It will be interesting to watch the mirror-less technology and market develop. I'm happy with DSLRs for what I shoot, which means I won't be making a change until I see some distinct advantage. Buying new lenses and a body, spending money for new technology, aren't an advantage right now.  8)


A typical response from companies like Nikon and Canon. They're doing whatever they can to slow progress and downplay its significance to protect their profits and place in the market. Using strategies from horse buggy makers seems like a pretty bad idea.

The new Sony a6000 seems perfectly capable of focus tracking and 10 ft./s. It may not be quite as good as DSLRs are yet but it's pretty close.

When enough people disagree with Nikon by taking their money elsewhere maybe they will wake up. Or maybe not and they'll end up like Kodak.

Hobostocker

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« Reply #20 on: October 23, 2014, 23:26 »
-2
as a technology, DSLR is a dead man walking and it must go, the sooner the better !

said that, what we really need is 72mm sensors and bigger lenses.

35mm is a relic of the past, all the troubles we're having now with low iso and noise are because we're still stuck with small sensors.

on top of this, pro cameras are sold as "all purposes" cameras and this is not a good thing, i would welcome a proper "night camera" that is specifically designed for shooting hand held by night at decent speed with a custom sensor that only works in low light.




Dook

« Reply #21 on: October 24, 2014, 05:18 »
0
There are bigger sensors, but they are too expensive.

« Reply #22 on: October 24, 2014, 12:33 »
+1
as a technology, DSLR is a dead man walking and it must go, the sooner the better !

said that, what we really need is 72mm sensors and bigger lenses.

35mm is a relic of the past, all the troubles we're having now with low iso and noise are because we're still stuck with small sensors.

on top of this, pro cameras are sold as "all purposes" cameras and this is not a good thing, i would welcome a proper "night camera" that is specifically designed for shooting hand held by night at decent speed with a custom sensor that only works in low light.

In other words you would welcome the Sony A7s

« Reply #23 on: October 24, 2014, 13:35 »
+2
I've been a user of the Sony nex 6 for over a year now. It's an awesome camera, with image quality that rivals the t3i in a much smaller package. I've also uses adapters to mount old MD mount lenses on the camera. Things like focus peaking and magnified view in the EVF, something that an OVF can never give, are absolutely suited up using old manual lenses. It's been a joy to use and its hardly ever that I've missed the extra bottons or bigger battery of a proper DSLR

Hobostocker

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« Reply #24 on: October 28, 2014, 18:14 »
0
In other words you would welcome the Sony A7s

in fact i'm keeping an eye on Sony since a long time but so fai i'm disappointed.

« Reply #25 on: October 28, 2014, 19:54 »
+1
I started the move toward Mirrorless with the OM-D E-M5 2 years ago. I wrote a post after 4 months using it for almost every kind of shoots. You can read it here: http://www.mirrorlessjourney.com/blog/2014/9/four-months-with-the-om-d

Last year, I bought a Panasonic GX7 and I love this camera so much. It just feels right in my hands. The Micro 4/3 lenses are awesome. My first year with the GX7: http://www.mirrorlessjourney.com/blog/2014/9/panasonic-lumix-dmc-gx7

Someone mentioned adapted lenses: I bought a focal reducer not long ago and I'm using it with the 35mm f/1.4 I still had from my full frame and the results are great. http://www.mirrorlessjourney.com/blog/2014/9/focal-reducer

Last July, I finished my transition. I sold the last 5D Mark II I had and all the rest of my lenses (besides the 35 f/1.4) and I have no regret at all. I now shoot with a GX7 and a GH4 (which is awesome in video) and I will soon buy a Panasonic LX100 as a walk about camera.

That said, Olympus, Panasonic, Fuji and Sony all make great and innovative cameras at the moment. Nikon and Canon are boring and lagging behind in the R&D.

Hobostocker

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« Reply #26 on: October 28, 2014, 20:30 »
+1
Nikon and Canon are boring and lagging behind in the R&D.

of course because if they make a killer mirrorless camera it would cannibalize the sales of their DSLR line.

all they can do is sell and overpriced and underpowered mirrorless camera and that's exactly what they're doing now and i'm sure they know very well it won't go far but it's their choice and things can change overnight if and when the demand for pro mirrorless will start to grow.

i think we'll have to wait 2-3 more yrs before there's serious demand for mirrorless among pros.
and then it will cost as much as a pro DSLR (2-3000$) so what's the point ? you think they'll sell for 500$ ? no way.

i remember when the D3x came out .. 8000$ !! just because the sensor was 24MP, hahaha.








« Reply #27 on: October 29, 2014, 04:00 »
+2
The point, surely, is size and weight?  I'm seriously considering getting the A7r in the not too distant future.

« Reply #28 on: October 29, 2014, 14:40 »
0
no desire to switch to mirrorless .. but I wouldn't mind adding one to my gear as a goto system that I could quickly grab on the way out the door when shooting is not a priority. I prefer to have a bigger/heavier camera but in many cases it gets left at home or the studio because it's not convenient to bring.


 

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