MicrostockGroup Sponsors


Author Topic: Monopod advice  (Read 9972 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

gillian vann

  • *Gillian*
« on: June 01, 2013, 00:44 »
0
I'm heading off overseas in a few months and as much as I would like to I won't take my Manfrotto tripod so as to reduce luggage in the hire car. I've been wanting a monopod for ages so this trip will finally force me to purchase one.

But, which one? my local camera store has the Manfrotto 294A3 for $89. It only weighs 53g and is compact at 59cm. however for the same money i can order online elsewhere and purchase the 680B (3 or 4 sections).

We do get slightly diff versions in Australia versus elsewhere and one tip the clever geek informed was that the 294 has a 'standard' chair foot rubber size, meaning when the bottom rubber inevitably gets lost, i can go to my local hardware store and buy a replacement for a few bucks, whereas the other sizes are european and so unlikely to be as easy to find.

Of course i'd love the cool one with the squeezy grip, and I know choosing a tripod on its weight is wrong, but in this case i've got travel weight limits to consider. I'm not buying a head for it either, as I want it to slip inside my suitcase with ease.


Poncke v2

« Reply #1 on: June 01, 2013, 04:55 »
0
How much space is a monopod going to save you in your hire car? Cant be a whole lot imo. Is the purchase justified is what I am going at. Is it worth the cost?

Beppe Grillo

« Reply #2 on: June 01, 2013, 08:09 »
0
You don't need a monopod, you need an assistant ;)

(So, something in the middle: a bipode)
« Last Edit: June 01, 2013, 09:29 by Beppe Grillo »

steheap

  • Author of best selling "Get Started in Stock"

« Reply #3 on: June 01, 2013, 08:12 »
+3
Gillian

I bought a monopod about 2 years ago, and I don't think I have used it once (perhaps I should sell it!!)

I always try to take my tripod with me - I find that I want to use a tripod when the light is getting low (or for some night time cityscape shots or HDR images) and the monopod is useless for that. I have a little carbon fiber one with 4 sections which I take when space and weight are really important and a more sturdy 3 section tripod that I take when I am hiring a car and can just put the tripod in the back.

Steve

« Reply #4 on: June 01, 2013, 13:53 »
0
We bought a monopod a few years ago, in Sydney as it happens. We used it once, found it offered no advantage over a stabilised lens, and have never used it since.

Have you actually tried one?

If you're travelling to Chch, I'll meet you at the airport and you can have it for $50:-)

We have a Gitzo 1197 basalt tripod for travelling, expensive but worth it.
« Last Edit: June 01, 2013, 16:22 by Travelling-light »

« Reply #5 on: June 01, 2013, 14:35 »
+2
get a gorillapod - light,  versatile, and small

« Reply #6 on: June 01, 2013, 15:23 »
+3
get a gorillapod - light,  versatile, and small

... but utterly useless for a heavy pro-DSLR with L glass.

« Reply #7 on: June 01, 2013, 15:33 »
0
I bought a very expensive monopod, thinking that it would be more convenient than an equally expensive tripod.  It wasn't, at least for me.  So then I got the expensive tripod.  And then I got an equally expensive Gitzo Traveler.  That's the one I use the most; it folds small enough to travel with, it's light enough to take on my occasional hike with my camera, and it's stable enough for the gear I use most.  I've added a Really Right Stuff ballhead and their L-bracket, and they're a great combination.  Laughably expensive, but they should outlast me.

« Reply #8 on: June 01, 2013, 15:42 »
0
when I am traveling or spending a day somewhere I usually carry a Velbon Ultra Rexi L (http://www.ephotozine.com/article/velbon-ultra-rexi-l-tripod-review-16157), it works very well and very small (36cm), goes into every bag (even most women bags), it holds easily my d90 + 80-200 or 24-70, have a simple manfrotto head (494RC2)

inside I have the manfrotto 055x with the joystick head

« Reply #9 on: June 01, 2013, 16:19 »
+1
get a gorillapod - light,  versatile, and small

... but utterly useless for a heavy pro-DSLR with L glass.

no - I have a fullframe Canon 5d m2  and have used it with the 16-35 and 24 - 105 lens without issue.  I have not tried it with a larger zoom lens  i.e.  100 -400
the pod I used it was was their biggest one - it is an X model I beleive

« Reply #10 on: June 01, 2013, 16:25 »
+1
.
« Last Edit: May 12, 2014, 13:19 by Audi 5000 »

tab62

« Reply #11 on: June 01, 2013, 16:32 »
0

« Reply #12 on: June 01, 2013, 18:14 »
+1
53 grams. ?? The weight of a mars bar.

I have a monfroto monopod but I don't use it for travelling I only use it with my 100-400mm for sports and wildlife which it works quite well. It probably most useful for not having to hold the weight inbetween shots.
 Landscapes and alike it wouldn't be much use.

Ask Yuri he was recommending a monopod for studio work with lights.

« Reply #13 on: June 01, 2013, 19:28 »
0
I have a Benro monopod, with a Benro ball head. Suits my eventual needs. I don't carry the "real" tripod in my trips because of size and weight. The monopod I may even carry in a trail.

gillian vann

  • *Gillian*
« Reply #14 on: June 01, 2013, 19:43 »
+1
oh thanks for all the replies.

i don't want to take my manfrotto tripod as we're a family of 7 (taking grandparents too), we are flying, and we are all travelling super light with very small bags (think: fitting that many bags in a car) and my manfrotto bag is large. the monopod will easily slide into my suitcase. we're travelling to Sydney and Melbourne this winter but in our own car, so I can take my serious tripod no worries.

yes, i watched Yuri's vid on a monopod for shooting and I couldn't agree more: using a big lens requires the extra stabilisation IMHO. i bought my 80-200 2.8 years ago and couldn't quite afford the 70-200 with image stabilising. such is life. an $89 monopod is a good solution.

Also remember there are plenty of places now that no longer let you set up a tripod.
I am getting one, so no need to talk me out of it.  :D

« Reply #15 on: June 02, 2013, 05:12 »
0
Be interested to know what you settle for?

« Reply #16 on: June 02, 2013, 05:29 »
0
I have had a monopod for years... some kind of manfroto thing. I rarely use it. Whereas I use the tripod all the time.
A monopod is almost useless, without a ball head, and the head from my tripod cannot fit onto the monopod.
So I suggest you look into both ballheads and pods.

Then there is also other options: such as the string trick or the stick trick.

Many things can be achieved with a 1/4 inch screw and some intermistic local hardware. Someone with his hands attached properly to his brain could always make some kind of camera support with just a screw and a piece of metal.

The 1/4 inch screw is the most important thing, and in metric countries its not so easy to find.
Then monopods dont really stabilize the camera as a tripod does. It helps, but it wont work in low light conditions as would the tripod.
If you have a VR lens and a relatively modern camera, that alone should compensate enough and you wouldnt need a monopod. The advantage of VR far supercedes a monopod.

And if everything else fails, then just take shaken "authentic" photos, they are in demand many places. ;-)


« Last Edit: June 02, 2013, 05:36 by JPSDK »

gillian vann

  • *Gillian*
« Reply #17 on: June 02, 2013, 06:07 »
0
I have had a monopod for years... some kind of manfroto thing. I rarely use it. Whereas I use the tripod all the time.
A monopod is almost useless, without a ball head, and the head from my tripod cannot fit onto the monopod.
So I suggest you look into both ballheads and pods.

The 1/4 inch screw is the most important thing, and in metric countries its not so easy to find.
Then monopods dont really stabilize the camera as a tripod does. It helps, but it wont work in low light conditions as would the tripod.
If you have a VR lens and a relatively modern camera, that alone should compensate enough and you wouldnt need a monopod. The advantage of VR far supercedes a monopod.

And if everything else fails, then just take shaken "authentic" photos, they are in demand many places. ;-)

actually the monopod i'm looking at will take the head i have my current tripod. or the camera (or lens) will just screw in. that's pretty convenient.

« Reply #18 on: June 02, 2013, 06:45 »
+2
There you go.

But when you are out and about, with stock in mind.
There are difficult shots, such as those that collide with your family, and then there are easy stock photos.
Roadsigns, waste, aircraft engines and conveyor belts.
Dont forget the easy ones.

A mosquito in the bathroom may be many times more valuable than the splendid view over the habor in Hong Kong.
And some blurred shallow dof shots down the aisle of the plane might earn back the tickets.
« Last Edit: June 02, 2013, 06:49 by JPSDK »

gillian vann

  • *Gillian*
« Reply #19 on: June 02, 2013, 20:22 »
0
There you go.

But when you are out and about, with stock in mind.
There are difficult shots, such as those that collide with your family, and then there are easy stock photos.
Roadsigns, waste, aircraft engines and conveyor belts.
Dont forget the easy ones.

A mosquito in the bathroom may be many times more valuable than the splendid view over the habor in Hong Kong.
And some blurred shallow dof shots down the aisle of the plane might earn back the tickets.
not sure why anyone gave you a - for that.
great advice. and I couldn't agree more, I'm still hoping to take that "easy" shot that sells and sells (I shot my feet at the beach last summer that is selling every day at SS, but hardly paying for the fuel to get there yet). I won't bother with landscapes, NZ has been done to death. plus, they really aren't my thing.

WarrenPrice

« Reply #20 on: June 02, 2013, 21:04 »
0
Have gotten much more use out of my gorilla pod than than my monopod ... but, the monopod is more useful for action, moving targets, longer lenses.
If it's something you would use a tripod for ... I vote for the gorilla. 


tab62

« Reply #21 on: June 02, 2013, 21:12 »
+1
Don't worry I just trumped the - with a heart  ;)



gillian vann

  • *Gillian*
« Reply #22 on: June 02, 2013, 21:18 »
0
Have gotten much more use out of my gorilla pod than than my monopod ... but, the monopod is more useful for action, moving targets, longer lenses.
If it's something you would use a tripod for ... I vote for the gorilla.
i have a gorilla pod, never used it...
i think i really want the monopod for using my 80-200, it's just so heavy.

photografiero

  • www.photografie.ro
« Reply #23 on: July 20, 2016, 23:03 »
0
Monopod - Sirui - Another use: I keep it all the time connected to the camera and use it to support the camera on my belt when I am not using it ...

« Reply #24 on: March 02, 2017, 03:25 »
0
I wish one buy I could buy  this device)


 

Related Topics

  Subject / Started by Replies Last post
7 Replies
5054 Views
Last post August 05, 2007, 01:05
by IRCrockett
43 Replies
18319 Views
Last post December 03, 2010, 16:52
by qwerty
Monopod

Started by madelaide « 1 2  All » Cameras / Lenses

27 Replies
10499 Views
Last post November 12, 2010, 15:03
by madelaide
5 Replies
4188 Views
Last post November 11, 2010, 06:38
by Dook
3 Replies
3205 Views
Last post August 10, 2011, 12:58
by Photon

Sponsors

Mega Bundle of 5,900+ Professional Lightroom Presets

Microstock Poll Results

Sponsors

3100 Posing Cards Bundle