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Author Topic: Wacom tablet - need pro version?  (Read 6958 times)

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« on: November 15, 2013, 14:20 »
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I'm thinking of buying a Wacom Intuos tablet for post production/retouching photos. Do I need the pro version or will the non-pro do the trick? Also, I have a 23" monitor -- will the small size tablet  be ok for this. Many thanks and sorry if this duplicates other posts.


EmberMike

« Reply #1 on: November 15, 2013, 15:03 »
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Wacom tablets tend to be personal preferences when it comes to size and type. Some people use the small Bamboo tabs and love them, others can't even think of using anything other than the biggest. Some people (like me) never get comfortable with tablets where you are working/drawing and not looking at the actual area you are drawing on. I had an Intuos for a while and ended up getting rid of it. Just never got comfortable with it. If I ever try another tablet, I think only the Cintiq would possibly work for me.

So long-story-short, I think you need to really try out some tablets yourself to figure out what works for you and what doesn't.

« Reply #2 on: November 15, 2013, 15:16 »
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Thnx EmberMike -- I think I will go for a smaller and cheaper model and see how it goes. I've never used one so I have no idea how I will fare with one.

« Reply #3 on: November 15, 2013, 18:11 »
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I agree this is one of those very personal preferences.

I've been using a Wacom Intuous for about 13 years (the kind they now call the Pro) and I not only use it for Photoshop and Illustrator but everything else. I have a mouse but I only use it in situations where the Wacom driver has crashed (which almost never happens).

For me, the thing that would rule out the Bamboo (the non-pro Intuous in the new naming scheme) is not having the keys and touchstrip. Cmd, Opt, shift spacebar and a zoom slider. I couldn't operate things efficiently without those.

The size isn't as important - I've used a small one that I keep for the laptop on a 24" desktop monitor and it works just fine.

There is a learning period where you built the muscle memory and if you have a low tolerance for frustration, you may not get through that. It does take some getting used to.

« Reply #4 on: November 15, 2013, 18:34 »
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Thnx EmberMike -- I think I will go for a smaller and cheaper model and see how it goes. I've never used one so I have no idea how I will fare with one.

I think this is a good idea. At work, I use a Bamboo Capture, which is a basic model. It works great for isolating product shots in Photoshop, which is what I use it for. At home, I do more creative things so I have an Intuos with the pen that has tilt and pressure capabilities, which works great for painting and drawing.

I would mention that I find the sensitivity of the Intuos much better. The best way I can describe this is that on the Capture, if I use the lasso tool, where I touch the tablet, it seems to "stick" a little. I have gotten used to it so it's really not an issue, but when I use my tablet at home I find it much easier. The key is that the faster you move with the pen on the Capture, the less "sticking."

Start out basic and then if you really like it, you can always upgrade. Have fun!

EmberMike

« Reply #5 on: November 15, 2013, 19:34 »
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If you just want to try out a tablet and see if it's even something you are interested in using without investing a few hundred dollars, maybe try something like this. Just $50 and has some similar capabilities as a Wacom.

ShadySue

« Reply #6 on: November 15, 2013, 19:41 »
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There is a learning period where you built the muscle memory and if you have a low tolerance for frustration, you may not get through that. It does take some getting used to.
I often read that you should hide your mouse and not use it and your muscle memory would develop after 48 hrs. I guess that's for younger people or those using their computer more hours per day than I was at the time of my first tablet. It took me 4 or 5 days, but now I literally have no idea where my mouse is, and use the tablet for everything.

PaulieWalnuts

  • On the Wrong Side of the Business
« Reply #7 on: November 15, 2013, 19:42 »
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I just started using an Intuos Medium and am now looking at getting a small. For me, the medium takes way too much arm movement but like others said it's a personal preference. I'm hoping the small is going to allow me to use more of my wrist. Not sure about the pro part.

I like it way better than a mouse working in Photoshop. 

« Reply #8 on: November 16, 2013, 04:47 »
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I been using the pen tool in adobe illustrator with a computer mouse to draw for years.
Recently, wacom has launched a new INTUOS PRo and i am thinking abt getting it.

Is Wacom any useful for me who has been using the pen tool in adobe illustrator?

« Reply #9 on: November 16, 2013, 07:29 »
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I use a Intuos Medium.  The pro version will pay for itself in time saved. The more you use it the more fluid you will become, Very useful for illustrator you just can't not get organic sweeping curves with a mouse. In Photoshop it is a must I do a lot of art work just in protoshop  that would not be possible  without the graphics tab. the programmable buttons speed up thing no end so you can rotate canvas or change brush size or even undo on the fly.

« Reply #10 on: November 16, 2013, 17:54 »
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Thank-you all for your responses. Much appreciated.

« Reply #11 on: November 17, 2013, 08:36 »
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"Very useful for illustrator you just can't not get organic sweeping curves with a mouse. "

Have to say I disagree with this. I used to use a tablet with Illustrator, now I find them cumbersome and the mouse a much better tool.

« Reply #12 on: November 17, 2013, 10:34 »
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When dragging an anchor point to make a bizarre curve I find it more fluid. Mouse also works fine. Sketching  out a design within illustrator is cumbersome with a mouse. It depends on how you work and what you want to achieve.  All the digital  artist that inspire me the most use graphics tabs.

ogm

« Reply #13 on: January 14, 2014, 07:09 »
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Is this kit useful for photo processing in PS or not worth?

http://www.amazon.com/INTUOS4-Pen-Pro-Accessory-Kit/dp/B002BH4QAA/ref=pd_sim_pc_3

« Reply #14 on: January 14, 2014, 07:59 »
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FYI -  I bought the smallest (and cheapest $99 @ Amazon) Wacom Intuos tablet. It's more than enough for me for retouching photos. Still trying to master it and have only been using it when a photo requires a lot of detailed work. Even then I'm not sure it's any easier than the mouse, but that could be my lack of skill with it at the time.

« Reply #15 on: January 14, 2014, 08:50 »
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for me a wacom tablet is useful because it can achieve close enough of hand written or hand drawings illustrations.. like u can write your signature on a wacom tablet, but not a mouse.. so the purpose is to duplicate the 'pen style' i guess..for illustrations.

for photoshop editing, i never feel like i need to use a wacom tablet..

ShadySue

« Reply #16 on: January 14, 2014, 09:21 »
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Is this kit useful for photo processing in PS or not worth?

http://www.amazon.com/INTUOS4-Pen-Pro-Accessory-Kit/dp/B002BH4QAA/ref=pd_sim_pc_3

Depends what you got with the pen you have. I got a whole set of nibs with my pen and I've only used one, but I'm sure an artist who is imitating natural media would get more use out of the various different nibs.

« Reply #17 on: February 12, 2014, 02:15 »
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Ok, I'm gonna make you  all cry foul... I use the touchpad on my laptop, and I deep-etch etc at the same speed as most on Tablets. However, I don't illustrate, which would be a nightmare on a touchpad. I just had to learn. I never had money for a Wacom, and by the time I.did, I couldn't be bothered. And I hate a normal mouse or even track-ball.

« Reply #18 on: February 12, 2014, 02:45 »
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For illustration I started using a Wacom Inkling. Its so nice to get back to drawing on paper and getting the results onto software.
The application is quirky, but its working for me. The cost of the unit is negligible - I paid around 100 euros.

« Reply #19 on: February 12, 2014, 09:36 »
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Bought it, used it for a while, but in the end I am back to my mouse. I think the problem is I do not have the time for the learning curve. it was slowing me down too much.  Maybe when I have some time I will go back and give it another try.

« Reply #20 on: February 12, 2014, 10:30 »
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Bought it, used it for a while, but in the end I am back to my mouse. I think the problem is I do not have the time for the learning curve. it was slowing me down too much.  Maybe when I have some time I will go back and give it another try.

It can take a little while to get the muscle memory going (and it does help if you just go cold turkey). I hope you give it another try at some point because it really is a huge difference. Or just switch to Lightroom for all your processing where I'd expect you'd not notice the problems with a mouse as much :)

« Reply #21 on: February 12, 2014, 11:17 »
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Bought it, used it for a while, but in the end I am back to my mouse. I think the problem is I do not have the time for the learning curve. it was slowing me down too much.  Maybe when I have some time I will go back and give it another try.

It can take a little while to get the muscle memory going (and it does help if you just go cold turkey). I hope you give it another try at some point because it really is a huge difference. Or just switch to Lightroom for all your processing where I'd expect you'd not notice the problems with a mouse as much :)

I use both Lightroom and PS Jo Ann, in that order so I'm sure the tablet would be an asset. I will have to give it another try when I have time.

« Reply #22 on: February 22, 2014, 07:19 »
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2 things about tablets,  there is a plastic cover that you can purchase that will basically eliminate nib wear.  I do not use my tablet alot but it does not seem to hurt the pressure sensitiviy too much, (some people on the internet say to cut your own nibs using weed eater line .065" nylon). My CTH670 Create is like sandpaper.   Also,  if you get a tablet either get one that is wireless or be ready to buy a longer cable,  waucom provides an incredibly terribly short cable for some reason,  never figured out why such a great tablet company would make such an idiot move as a 2.5 ft cable,  probably to sell the 50$ wireless add on.
« Last Edit: February 22, 2014, 07:25 by old crow »

« Reply #23 on: February 24, 2014, 09:31 »
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I think small is best for tablets as otherwise you have to wag your arm around a long way to navigate around the screen.  It also takes up a lot of desk space if you have a large one. 

Like Jo-Ann, I have also long since ditched the mouse.  I have had my Wacom bamboo for six years now and wouldn't be with out it.  Mine is just wearing out on the surface where I have used it so much so I will replace it soon, but after six years I think that is ok.

photografiero

  • www.photografie.ro
« Reply #24 on: July 20, 2016, 23:04 »
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Another vote to small Pro ... I bought the medium one but now I would but the small version!


 

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