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Author Topic: High Pass Filter - editing technique [Photoshop Tutorial]  (Read 10103 times)

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« on: February 23, 2010, 05:04 »
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Ok, well things are a little quiet today so i thought I would post a tutorial I recently did.  It is how to edit a photo using the high-pass filter to get a grunge sort of look.

High Pass Filter - Photoshop Editing Technique [In-Depth]


The tutorial is designed for the beginner Photoshop user so those who know what they are doing probably won't find it too helpful but hopefully some of you will.

If you want to critique the tutorial feel free - I have thick skin :)  I know I didn't explain how the high pass filter 'radius' setting works very well - I was at a bit of a loss for words :(
Tutorvid.com


WarrenPrice

« Reply #1 on: February 23, 2010, 14:54 »
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I'm still trying to understand what "grunge" is.   ::)

« Reply #2 on: February 25, 2010, 04:28 »
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I'm still trying to understand what "grunge" is.   ::)

Grunge:
1. US slang dirt or rubbish
2. (Music, other) a style of rock music originating in the US in the late 1980s, featuring a distorted guitar sound
3. (Clothing & Fashion) a deliberately untidy and uncoordinated fashion style

It"s the opposite of the French BCBG* or preppy.

* About the French acronym  bon chic bon genre or ("good style, good class"):

BCBG is a term originating from the Lyonnais region of France where the style has tended to be more conservative and preppy compared with the more avant-garde styles of Paris. The term BCBG is not necessarily construed as a compliment, since it has connotations of elitist snobbery, particularly when applied to young women. Consequently, the joke is often made that BCBG means "beau cul, belle gueule" (or, roughly, "nice ass, beautiful face" - though gueule is more literally translated as the muzzle/outward jaw of an animal, and thus more insulting).

« Reply #3 on: February 25, 2010, 04:41 »
0
I'm still trying to understand what "grunge" is.   ::)

Grunge:
1. US slang dirt or rubbish
2. (Music, other) a style of rock music originating in the US in the late 1980s, featuring a distorted guitar sound
3. (Clothing & Fashion) a deliberately untidy and uncoordinated fashion style

It"s the opposite of the French BCBG* or preppy.

* About the French acronym  bon chic bon genre or ("good style, good class"):

BCBG is a term originating from the Lyonnais region of France where the style has tended to be more conservative and preppy compared with the more avant-garde styles of Paris. The term BCBG is not necessarily construed as a compliment, since it has connotations of elitist snobbery, particularly when applied to young women. Consequently, the joke is often made that BCBG means "beau cul, belle gueule" (or, roughly, "nice ass, beautiful face" - though gueule is more literally translated as the muzzle/outward jaw of an animal, and thus more insulting).



or "ferme ta gueule",  . . . . SHUT UP!

« Reply #4 on: February 25, 2010, 05:40 »
0
I'm still trying to understand what "grunge" is.   ::)

Grunge:
1. US slang dirt or rubbish
2. (Music, other) a style of rock music originating in the US in the late 1980s, featuring a distorted guitar sound
3. (Clothing & Fashion) a deliberately untidy and uncoordinated fashion style

It"s the opposite of the French BCBG* or preppy.

* About the French acronym  bon chic bon genre or ("good style, good class"):

BCBG is a term originating from the Lyonnais region of France where the style has tended to be more conservative and preppy compared with the more avant-garde styles of Paris. The term BCBG is not necessarily construed as a compliment, since it has connotations of elitist snobbery, particularly when applied to young women. Consequently, the joke is often made that BCBG means "beau cul, belle gueule" (or, roughly, "nice ass, beautiful face" - though gueule is more literally translated as the muzzle/outward jaw of an animal, and thus more insulting).


thanks for the fashion lesson.  :) I haden't ever heard of the BCBG term before.

« Reply #5 on: February 25, 2010, 06:32 »
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I thought it was a good tutorial. It was it interesting also to here your voice leaf :)

hadnt heard bcbg either (which was also interesting) is it spelt out or pronounced as some sort of word (without vowels?) like yuppie or wysiwyg?

Phil

« Reply #6 on: February 25, 2010, 07:11 »
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thanks for the fashion lesson.  :) I haden't ever heard of the BCBG term before.
Well, having grown up in the fusion area between the two dominant European lifestyles/cultures, the Latin and the Germanic/Nordic one, has its advantages. Part of my family on mother's side was French-speaking and they were very BCBG. BCBG is even in the CV of iStock. It is preppy but also snob (sine nobilitas - without nobility).

In French snobbery is about the nouveaux riches (new money, new rich people by trade/commerce, with no noble ancestors and often not too educated) that tried to out-perform the old (noble's) wealth by an overdone, expensive lifestyle and fashion habits. Those bourgeois (plain but rich citizens) have been ridiculed well in Molire's play Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme (the middle-class/plain citizen gentleman). Another term would be social climbers.

Next time I'll entertain you about the differences between emo, punk  and goth  fashion/lifestyles if you're not too bored. Warren needs to absorb grunge first.  ;D

« Reply #7 on: February 25, 2010, 07:48 »
0
thanks for the fashion lesson.  :) I haden't ever heard of the BCBG term before.
Well, having grown up in the fusion area between the two dominant European lifestyles/cultures, the Latin and the Germanic/Nordic one, has its advantages. Part of my family on mother's side was French-speaking and they were very BCBG. BCBG is even in the CV of iStock. It is preppy but also snob (sine nobilitas - without nobility).

In French snobbery is about the nouveaux riches (new money, new rich people by trade/commerce, with no noble ancestors and often not too educated) that tried to out-perform the old (noble's) wealth by an overdone, expensive lifestyle and fashion habits. Those bourgeois (plain but rich citizens) have been ridiculed well in Molire's play Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme (the middle-class/plain citizen gentleman). Another term would be social climbers.

Next time I'll entertain you about the differences between emo, punk  and goth  fashion/lifestyles if you're not too bored. Warren needs to absorb grunge first.  ;D

Thanks for the dissertation, enjoyed it. Having lived in Provence for some years I have a special place in my heart for the French.

E

WarrenPrice

« Reply #8 on: February 25, 2010, 10:55 »
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Thanks to all for bringing me into the 21st century. ;D  I decided to stop being silly and actually watched the video.  It is interesting.  I understand how Ansel Adams would have reached the same effect but still would know grunge if it ....

FD ... I can make grunge sounds on my guitar but have no idea how the translate to images.    :P

Leaf, didn't mean to detract from the video.  I am in awe of people with the talent to do such things.  It made me wonder if this is what you and FD were talking about in the blog/tutorial thread?

« Reply #9 on: February 25, 2010, 11:03 »
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Leaf, didn't mean to detract from the video.  I am in awe of people with the talent to do such things.  It made me wonder if this is what you and FD were talking about in the blog/tutorial thread?
Writing short tutorials that address issues that pop up at any forum sooner or later, then are forgotten, till the next time a newbie bumps in. You can find the answers to all those questions if you have a lot of time to search the forum, here or elsewhere, but it would be nice to have it all in one place for quick reference.

WarrenPrice

« Reply #10 on: February 25, 2010, 12:56 »
0
Leaf, didn't mean to detract from the video.  I am in awe of people with the talent to do such things.  It made me wonder if this is what you and FD were talking about in the blog/tutorial thread?
Writing short tutorials that address issues that pop up at any forum sooner or later, then are forgotten, till the next time a newbie bumps in. You can find the answers to all those questions if you have a lot of time to search the forum, here or elsewhere, but it would be nice to have it all in one place for quick reference.

I am a former Tech Writer, FD.  Threads like this always get my attention until I realize that it isn't about the writing ... it is about knowing the subject.   :P
Guess I'll have to read more photography tips from you and Leaf.   ;D

« Reply #11 on: February 25, 2010, 13:02 »
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Guess I'll have to read more photography tips from you and Leaf.   ;D

Not really from me. I didn't even know the layer masks. I used it in an action for a long time, without realizing its potential. You'd better stick to Leaf. 8) You can do things in PS in several ways and it's always amazing to see how people do it differently.

To get back on track, there are other uses for swapping faces on images. Imagine a good shot where there are some faces you don't have a release for but is not newsworthy enough to be editorial. You then simply can swap heads in PS with the head of one of your released models.
That's why it's important not to throw your unused model images away but keep them. Some of those head positions might fit the head of your unreleased person. I used it once for stock for an aviation shot where (of course) I couldn't get a release from the crew. Image here.
« Last Edit: February 25, 2010, 13:15 by FD-amateur »


 

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