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Author Topic: How to blend two images into one (merging faces) [beginner]  (Read 10296 times)

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« on: February 24, 2010, 03:23 »
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Today's tutorial - blending two images into one.  Often when taking group shots you will have one person smiling nicely in one image and another person smiling nicely in another image.  To get the best smiles into one image - you have to merge the two.

How To Blend Two Images / Merge Faces - Beginner Photoshop Tutorial [In-Depth]

[TutorVid.com]
« Last Edit: February 25, 2010, 04:03 by leaf »


« Reply #1 on: February 24, 2010, 04:49 »
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I always wondered why people use layer masks for this. Isn't erasing at the edges of the faces much faster and easier?

« Reply #2 on: February 24, 2010, 05:34 »
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I always wondered why people use layer masks for this. Isn't erasing at the edges of the faces much faster and easier?

That is a one way path.  With masks you can go back to correct a missed detail, not to mention brush opacity and the opportunity to run a blur on the mask.
« Last Edit: February 24, 2010, 05:38 by etienjones »

« Reply #3 on: February 24, 2010, 06:00 »
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Excellent tutorial! Thanks Leaf  :)

« Reply #4 on: February 24, 2010, 07:56 »
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I always wondered why people use layer masks for this. Isn't erasing at the edges of the faces much faster and easier?

That is a one way path.  With masks you can go back to correct a missed detail, not to mention brush opacity and the opportunity to run a blur on the mask.

yep.. ditto.  If you erased the layer and made a mistake, you could probably get it back with the history brush but once you save and open the image again, you are locked into what you erased.

« Reply #5 on: February 24, 2010, 08:09 »
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I always wondered why people use layer masks for this. Isn't erasing at the edges of the faces much faster and easier?

That is a one way path.  With masks you can go back to correct a missed detail, not to mention brush opacity and the opportunity to run a blur on the mask.

yep.. ditto.  If you erased the layer and made a mistake, you could probably get it back with the history brush but once you save and open the image again, you are locked into what you erased.


Love your tutorials also, very clean and to the point.

Idea:  why not do an advanced tutorial to show the possibilities of masks, there are many.

Right, I am too lazy so you do it. ;D

E


« Reply #6 on: February 24, 2010, 08:35 »
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That is a one way path.  With masks you can go back to correct a missed detail, not to mention brush opacity and the opportunity to run a blur on the mask.
Sorry to look dumb, but you can go back in the history, and you can set your erase brush opacity and softness too. Not that I doubt this is a better way perhaps. I was just wondering.

RT


« Reply #7 on: February 24, 2010, 09:08 »
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Sorry to look dumb, but you can go back in the history......

Not once you've saved the file, however with a layer mask you can go back if you saved the file layers in tact.

« Reply #8 on: February 24, 2010, 15:08 »
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Idea:  why not do an advanced tutorial to show the possibilities of masks, there are many.



how do you mean?  

« Reply #9 on: February 24, 2010, 16:02 »
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Idea:  why not do an advanced tutorial to show the possibilities of masks, there are many.



how do you mean?  


I mentioned, for example, of the possibility of showing how using a Gaussian Blur on a mask that was created from a selection can create a feathered effect for a particular adjustment layer. You could also explain how you can "unlink" a mask allowing it to be moved within the layer. For portraits I often create a B+W Adjustment Layer with mask to put around the subject, blur the mask, and move it around until it has the effect I am hoping for . . .  Most people don't know that you can run a filter on a mask creating different effects,  although this might not pretain to pure photography. 

Back to the Gaussian Blur.  During the winter I had some shots with snow that had a few areas with Level 254-255.  I used a temporary Threshold Adjustment Layer to isolate these areas, magic wand to make the selection, and created a Selective Color (White) Adjustment Layer with mask from that selection to dial the numbers back to around 251-252.  That mask had to be blurred since using Threshold gives a very hard mask.

Hope you get my point, I'm not very good putting workflow into words . . . . .


 

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