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Author Topic: Is setting 80$ for a 4k video is too high?  (Read 23858 times)

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« on: March 07, 2016, 01:40 »
0
Hi, my first batch of my footages of 160 clips just have been approve... but no sales at all for almost 2 weeks.

I set my 4k video price for about 60-85$ because I don't want to undercut my price with other agencies such as ss, fotolia, anf 123rf.

So I wonder that is my price is too high?

Any suggestions and comment will be appreciate, thanks.

ps. by the way my footage are animations (motion graphic).


« Reply #1 on: March 07, 2016, 05:04 »
+3
It can take several months before videos start selling. I dont think the price really affects this. People need to find you, lightbox your files and then have a project where your files fit.

It took more than 6 months before I got regular sales on pond5.

« Reply #2 on: March 07, 2016, 05:33 »
+1
no is not too high

« Reply #3 on: March 07, 2016, 06:09 »
+1
I've raised my 4K to $99 now because I sold one twice but they only bought the 1080 version and it was too cheap.  I doubt 4K sells as well as 1080 at the moment.

SpaceStockFootage

  • Space, Sci-Fi and Astronomy Related Stock Footage

« Reply #4 on: March 07, 2016, 06:30 »
+3
I wouldn't say it was too high. Maybe too low if anything. I have all my 4K stuff at $99 and my 1080p at $49, although I was selling them for less for a while. Too early to say if the increase will affect my sales, but I did sell two clips at $49 the day after I increased the prices, so we'll see.

Benozaur

« Reply #5 on: March 07, 2016, 06:53 »
+6
Its hard to tell why your clips aren't selling if we haven't seen them...
I price my 4K clips at $195 on Pond and they sell well enough. At this price point content is king and the client will pay for what they need if they can't find it elsewhere. I think $ 80 is too cheap - unless the clips are over represented in their category i.e. if all you have are beaches and sunsets then good luck selling them at any price.

« Reply #6 on: March 07, 2016, 06:56 »
+6
Why leaving money on the table?
Mine are set between $149 and $189.
I start with $149 and I raise the price to $189 after the first sale.

Sent from my SM-N910T using Tapatalk
« Last Edit: March 07, 2016, 10:21 by Zero Talent »

« Reply #7 on: March 07, 2016, 10:40 »
+2
Why leaving money on the table?
Mine are set between $149 and $189.
I start with $149 and I raise the price to $189 after the first sale.

Sent from my SM-N910T using Tapatalk

Zero Talent, Benozaur ...  any sales since membership announcement?

Benozaur

« Reply #8 on: March 07, 2016, 11:10 »
+2
Why leaving money on the table?
Mine are set between $149 and $189.
I start with $149 and I raise the price to $189 after the first sale.

Sent from my SM-N910T using Tapatalk

Zero Talent, Benozaur ...  any sales since membership announcement?


A few HD sales but nothing special - a dip perhaps but its still too early to tell...

« Reply #9 on: March 07, 2016, 11:18 »
+1
Thank you for every reply! I will raise my prize immediately  ;D

Just another question, how is Pond5 sales compare to Shutterstock in term of quantity?

Thanks

« Reply #10 on: March 07, 2016, 22:52 »
+6
I set my 4k video price for about 60-85$ because I don't want to undercut my price with other agencies such as ss, fotolia, anf 123rf.
But you ARE undercutting your price with the other agencies. $60 to $85 is a good price for HD. 4K is selling for $130 to $199 on the other 3 agencies you mentioned.

« Reply #11 on: March 12, 2016, 11:58 »
+1
I set my 4k video price for about 60-85$ because I don't want to undercut my price with other agencies such as ss, fotolia, anf 123rf.
But you ARE undercutting your price with the other agencies. $60 to $85 is a good price for HD. 4K is selling for $130 to $199 on the other 3 agencies you mentioned.

I increase my price now. But after checking other footages all over the site, they are full of low-price cutting clips.  :-\

« Reply #12 on: March 12, 2016, 14:08 »
+1
I set my 4k at around $120-200.

« Reply #13 on: March 12, 2016, 15:28 »
+1
I set my 4k at around $120-200.

I have started to price some of my 4k work lower than 200 as well. If it's is a very common subject then I will price it a few bucks lower.  My 4k ranges from $140 to $200. I still have yet to sell a single 4k clip, though.  Been shooting it since May 2015.

SpaceStockFootage

  • Space, Sci-Fi and Astronomy Related Stock Footage

« Reply #14 on: March 12, 2016, 18:05 »
+2
I don't want to labour the point about Envato potentially being less terrible than everyone makes them out to be... but I've had 180 Ultra High Definition sales (2K, 4K etc) there, which has netted me about $2,000 in the last 15 months. My UHD sales on every other site may result in a much higher income per sale, but my total net from all the other sites combined, over the same  period, is $480.

Yes, Envato (or VideoHive) isn't for everyone. After Effects projects sell better than motion graphics clips and motion graphics clips sell better than stock footage... but I really feel people should ignore the 'sticker price shock' when it comes to the low prices and focus on how much they have in their pockets at the end of the month. Would I rather be trotting down the high street with $480 in my pocket, over the moon and safe in the knowledge that my 4K clips sold for $99 or $199... or would I rather the doing the same with the considerably higher amount of $2,000 in my pocket... even if my clips only sold for $8/$20/$25? I know what I'd prefer.


 

« Reply #15 on: March 12, 2016, 18:16 »
+2
I don't want to labour the point about Envato potentially being less terrible than everyone makes them out to be... but I've had 180 Ultra High Definition sales (2K, 4K etc) there, which has netted me about $2,000 in the last 15 months. My UHD sales on every other site may result in a much higher income per sale, but my total net from all the other sites combined, over the same  period, is $480.

Yes, Envato (or VideoHive) isn't for everyone. After Effects projects sell better than motion graphics clips and motion graphics clips sell better than stock footage... but I really feel people should ignore the 'sticker price shock' when it comes to the low prices and focus on how much they have in their pockets at the end of the month. Would I rather be trotting down the high street with $480 in my pocket, over the moon and safe in the knowledge that my 4K clips sold for $99 or $199... or would I rather the doing the same with the considerably higher amount of $2,000 in my pocket... even if my clips only sold for $8/$20/$25? I know what I'd prefer.

I hear what you're saying but the problem with Videohive is that the high volume of sales are only happening because of a low number of contributors and clips overall. Down the road the number of clips will increase and your volume will fall leaving a loosing situation of poor prices AND low volume. This affects all other contributors. Even ones who've chosen to never licensed their footage through Videohive.

« Reply #16 on: March 12, 2016, 18:22 »
+1
I set my 4k at around $120-200.

I have started to price some of my 4k work lower than 200 as well. If it's is a very common subject then I will price it a few bucks lower.  My 4k ranges from $140 to $200. I still have yet to sell a single 4k clip, though.  Been shooting it since May 2015.

I have sold both through P5 and SS. I agree it depends on the subject.

« Reply #17 on: March 12, 2016, 18:46 »
+1
I don't want to labour the point about Envato potentially being less terrible than everyone makes them out to be... but I've had 180 Ultra High Definition sales (2K, 4K etc) there, which has netted me about $2,000 in the last 15 months. My UHD sales on every other site may result in a much higher income per sale, but my total net from all the other sites combined, over the same  period, is $480.

Yes, Envato (or VideoHive) isn't for everyone. After Effects projects sell better than motion graphics clips and motion graphics clips sell better than stock footage... but I really feel people should ignore the 'sticker price shock' when it comes to the low prices and focus on how much they have in their pockets at the end of the month. Would I rather be trotting down the high street with $480 in my pocket, over the moon and safe in the knowledge that my 4K clips sold for $99 or $199... or would I rather the doing the same with the considerably higher amount of $2,000 in my pocket... even if my clips only sold for $8/$20/$25? I know what I'd prefer.

Yes, by all means, ignore the sticker shock. Envanto then gets more and you get less...perfect ;)

SpaceStockFootage

  • Space, Sci-Fi and Astronomy Related Stock Footage

« Reply #18 on: March 13, 2016, 02:51 »
+2
Well if prices are low then authors get less per clip and Envato get less per clip. I'm on about total revenue though.

As for a low number of clips overall, that's a very valid point. Envato do seem to be heading in the right direction when it comes to prices though, as they've gradually been increasing over time. There was a post from the Envato forums that somebody linked to the other day where some guy was getting 25% per sale on a $4 HD clip. So $1. That was back in 2011. They're now paying 36% per sale (50 to 70% for exclusive), and HD clips are now $8 ($9 for over 30 seconds and $10 for over 60 seconds). So that's $2.88

Still not much, but a big increase on what authors were getting five years ago. Number of clips are increasing pretty rapidly as well, but I can never see them reaching the likes of Pond5. Footage and motion graphics do seem to be quite secondary to After Effects projects, so I can understand it not being the go to place for stock buyers/shooters. I still feel that most people should be looking at three things when it comes to uploading tot a site or not... how much the clips are priced at, what percentage the author gets and how many sales the author gets, or is likely to get. A great result on all three of those is the holy grail, but I've not found it yet.

I mean, $300 a clip is great, but not if you're getting 1% a sale... and 100% a sale is great, but not if you're not getting any sales.

« Reply #19 on: March 13, 2016, 03:29 »
+2
I don't want to labour the point about Envato potentially being less terrible than everyone makes them out to be... but I've had 180 Ultra High Definition sales (2K, 4K etc) there, which has netted me about $2,000 in the last 15 months. My UHD sales on every other site may result in a much higher income per sale, but my total net from all the other sites combined, over the same  period, is $480.

Yes, Envato (or VideoHive) isn't for everyone. After Effects projects sell better than motion graphics clips and motion graphics clips sell better than stock footage... but I really feel people should ignore the 'sticker price shock' when it comes to the low prices and focus on how much they have in their pockets at the end of the month. Would I rather be trotting down the high street with $480 in my pocket, over the moon and safe in the knowledge that my 4K clips sold for $99 or $199... or would I rather the doing the same with the considerably higher amount of $2,000 in my pocket... even if my clips only sold for $8/$20/$25? I know what I'd prefer.
This doesn't make sense to me.  If you didn't sell on Envato, I think you would be selling more on the other sites. So you could be making more than $2,000.  We don't know how many buyers hunt around for the lowest price but it must happen.  The problem is, when they get 4k for such a low price, they might not want to pay more.  Then we all have no choice but to sell clips at very low prices and your sales will go down because everyone will be selling at the same price.  So if we all used Envato, sales would be diluted and we would be making almost nothing.

SpaceStockFootage

  • Space, Sci-Fi and Astronomy Related Stock Footage

« Reply #20 on: March 13, 2016, 04:02 »
+2
I think they're a different market that appeals to a different buyer. Sure, they might be the same items, but I can't see somebody who was hoping to pay $8 being happy to pay $49 or $79. And it's not like my work is amazingly unique or of such a high standard that people have no option but to buy it, they shouldn't have too much trouble finding something that's at least similar. Sure, I like to think that my work is pretty good, but I've got to be realistic.

The 'traditional' buyers of microstock probably have the budgets to spend $79 on a single clip, and maybe use several of them throughout a production. I think places like Envato cater more to the burgeoning market of people creating their own content... bloggers, Youtubers, 'one man band' video production freelancers etc. Cameras, software, and the ability to publish your own work is getting faster, better and cheaper. Such people might not want to spend $199 on a 4K clip when they can spend $199 on a 4K camera.

(Just as a disclaimer, I'm aware that footage from a $199 4K camera isn't going to be very good, and it takes a hell of a lot more than owning a camera to make decent footage. Aside from having all the kit, you need skills and experience... you can't just hang around on street corners where business people might be shaking hands.)   

But yeah... although I don't really have any firm evidence to support the fact that they're two different markets with two different buyers... from what I'm seeing, I think that's the case, and I think that there is room for both. I'm just trying to make a profit from both as well, rather than limit myself to one or the other! Maybe what I'm saying is similar to what people were saying when microstock first appeared over right managed. I wasn't around back then, but were people saying "$199 for Full SD? What's wrong with you?!"

Maybe places like Envato should be called nanostock. A different market to MS, just like the difference between MS and RM.   

« Reply #21 on: March 13, 2016, 05:04 »
+2
I had a look at envato. Do you really need to create thumbnails preview images etc for every file? They seem to have the most complicated upload process I have seen so far.

For old content and testshots, a low price site is a sensible place.

But then the upload process should be easy.

SpaceStockFootage

  • Space, Sci-Fi and Astronomy Related Stock Footage

« Reply #22 on: March 13, 2016, 06:13 »
+1
I used to hate the upload process, it put me off uploading stuff. But although I still kind of hate it, I do like the ability to choose the exact frame I want to display, and dictate the scale/framing. Also, it means I can brand my preview images, so people can recognize my stuff at a glance. It's handy for motion graphics stuff as well, as I can add a list of features on the preview image... looped, with transparency etc. Last but not least, I have a portfolio of sound effects that I use in my preview videos (for motion graphics stuff), but not in my downloadable video file. It makes the preview more engaging with some audio, and I can cross sell my sound effects with something along the line of "the sound effects used in the preview video are not included, but can be licensed here...". Here's an example...

http://videohive.net/item/entering-hyperspace/15244382

...or, sometimes I include the sound effects to add value to the clip. I might only upload a couple of new clips a week so it's not too bad for me creating the preview stuff, but I can imagine it being a complete pain for anybody looking to upload a large existing portfolio.

But yeah, an automated process, with the option to override would be much better. Also, not a fan of having to upload 4K and 1080p versions. It should just be the 4K version with an option for what size the buyer wants to go for.

« Reply #23 on: March 13, 2016, 08:58 »
0
The ability to offer everything, from superhigh quality to cheap stuff for bloggers or people who just have fun making clips was the biggest attraction of pond5.

If they now want to become an elitist site and reject a lot of our uploads, then this is a very significant change in direction.

It s a pitty their original marketplace system was brilliant. All it needed was one or two talented editors that go through it all and select great content for every budget.

Plus give the customer the option to subscribe to galleries and collections.

At the same time treat us as entrepreneurs and stay out of the individual portfolio.

I havent had a single sale on pond5 this month. I dont get downloads every day, but it seems like a long stretch.

But I dont know if it can be blamed on the new system.
« Last Edit: March 13, 2016, 09:01 by cobalt »

« Reply #24 on: March 13, 2016, 09:11 »
0
The ability to offer everything, from superhigh quality to cheap stuff for bloggers or people who just have fun making clips was the biggest attraction of pond5.

If they now want to become an elitist site and reject a lot of our uploads, then this is a very significant change in direction.

It s a pitty their original marketplace system was brilliant. All it needed was one or two talented editors that go through it all and select great content for every budget.

Plus give the customer the option to subscribe to galleries and collections.

At the same time treat us as entrepreneurs and stay out of the individual portfolio.

I havent had a single sale on pond5 this month. I dont get downloads every day, but it seems like a long stretch.

But I dont know if it can be blamed on the new system.

Not sure either. I do, however, see wide swings in sales. I have about 1000 clips there and 3500 images. I can go a week without a sale, then I get an image sale, then nothing for two weeks, then a few clip sales over the next couple of weeks. Once the new system came aboard I am getting regular sales, like 10 videos in March so far.  So too early to tell but certainly a coincidence. 

Now, what I believe is happening is that they are still crafting their new strategy and putting effort around that, which, as others have pointed out, boxes a lot of us out of future opportunities.  I am more worried about that than the current swings because the current swings can be what amounts to one long permanent bad swing.  It's also possible that they are playing with the search to do something like Dreamtime is doing, which is conducting a periodic (I think every week or so) search shuffle to make it "fair for everyone". Forget good key wording; forget good shooting; forget differentiation and uniqueness. Fairness trumps our hard work at DT and I am seeing similar swings on P5 now.  Just a guess, though.   

« Reply #25 on: March 13, 2016, 09:50 »
+1
The ability to offer everything, from superhigh quality to cheap stuff for bloggers or people who just have fun making clips was the biggest attraction of pond5.

If they now want to become an elitist site and reject a lot of our uploads, then this is a very significant change in direction.

It s a pitty their original marketplace system was brilliant. All it needed was one or two talented editors that go through it all and select great content for every budget.

Plus give the customer the option to subscribe to galleries and collections.

At the same time treat us as entrepreneurs and stay out of the individual portfolio.

I havent had a single sale on pond5 this month. I dont get downloads every day, but it seems like a long stretch.

But I dont know if it can be blamed on the new system.

Well, P5 wanted investors to help them grow, so now they got to play by greedy Wall St rules.   8)
« Last Edit: March 13, 2016, 10:07 by KnowYourOnions »

« Reply #26 on: March 13, 2016, 15:29 »
+2
Well if prices are low then authors get less per clip and Envato get less per clip. I'm on about total revenue though.

As for a low number of clips overall, that's a very valid point. Envato do seem to be heading in the right direction when it comes to prices though, as they've gradually been increasing over time. There was a post from the Envato forums that somebody linked to the other day where some guy was getting 25% per sale on a $4 HD clip. So $1. That was back in 2011. They're now paying 36% per sale (50 to 70% for exclusive), and HD clips are now $8 ($9 for over 30 seconds and $10 for over 60 seconds). So that's $2.88

Still not much, but a big increase on what authors were getting five years ago. Number of clips are increasing pretty rapidly as well, but I can never see them reaching the likes of Pond5. Footage and motion graphics do seem to be quite secondary to After Effects projects, so I can understand it not being the go to place for stock buyers/shooters. I still feel that most people should be looking at three things when it comes to uploading tot a site or not... how much the clips are priced at, what percentage the author gets and how many sales the author gets, or is likely to get. A great result on all three of those is the holy grail, but I've not found it yet.

I mean, $300 a clip is great, but not if you're getting 1% a sale... and 100% a sale is great, but not if you're not getting any sales.

Your stuff is cool. It's a pity that you sell it so cheap.
If I want to buy your stuff and I found it in a place for 8 bucks, I will not buy it where is more expensive. But if I can only find it a bit more expensive then I'll pay for the stuff I need.

« Reply #27 on: March 25, 2016, 04:59 »
0
Good point by Robert Jung here.

https://www.facebook.com/pond5/posts/10154057079019777

Robert Jung:
I wonder if he was ever forced to sell artwork for 20$ and have a broadcast license attached to it.

Timo Hensen:
no one is forcing you..

Robert Jung:
You are right! that's why I priced my material higher than average. unfortunately, it has quite an impact on my sales. what would force the starving artist is simply the competition. if pond5 would adjust its license so you can price a limited license at 20$ and licenses with broader coverage could be priced beyond the 100-500 range. truly a shame. I've since then moved to other marketplaces.

« Reply #28 on: March 25, 2016, 06:20 »
+2
i set my 4k clips between 180 and 220 $ and i got sales. if anyone needs your clips they will pay for it. lets not reduce the video market to what photo market has become

« Reply #29 on: April 15, 2016, 21:42 »
+2
That's too low.  Buyers who want 4k video will pay $120+ easily.  4k files sell for about $200 on other sites. 

stockVid

« Reply #30 on: April 15, 2016, 22:09 »
+4
The 4K market is still very new.
HD1080p has yet to go the way of SD NTSC and PAL.
There is plenty of time before we start the 4K dive to the bottom.

Be proud of your work. Price your 4K at $199 or more. If you have quality work you will have sales at that price.

KB

« Reply #31 on: April 15, 2016, 22:55 »
+2
The fact that someone is even posting this question is 100% Pond5's fault.

I posted this last year, and while I haven't checked recently I suspect it hasn't changed by much. This is what P5 shows contributors when they go to set the price of an upload:

HD clips: $43.60 (all), $59.80 (best-selling)
4K clips: $50.30 (all), $80.30 (best-selling)

 :o

« Reply #32 on: April 16, 2016, 02:44 »
+1
I usually set it to 250/85 (4K/HD). Buyers don't seem to mind that.

« Reply #33 on: April 16, 2016, 03:08 »
0
The fact that someone is even posting this question is 100% Pond5's fault.

I posted this last year, and while I haven't checked recently I suspect it hasn't changed by much. This is what P5 shows contributors when they go to set the price of an upload:

HD clips: $43.60 (all), $59.80 (best-selling)
4K clips: $50.30 (all), $80.30 (best-selling)

 :o

S I C K

« Reply #34 on: April 16, 2016, 06:35 »
+1
Hi, my first batch of my footages of 160 clips just have been approve... but no sales at all for almost 2 weeks.

I set my 4k video price for about 60-85$ because I don't want to undercut my price with other agencies such as ss, fotolia, anf 123rf.

So I wonder that is my price is too high?

Any suggestions and comment will be appreciate, thanks.

ps. by the way my footage are animations (motion graphic).

Nobody can really answer that without seeing your footage - I find that I get regular 4K sales priced at $149 per clip, but that doesn't mean that everyone will - sales depend really on the strength of your content. If its simple animations then maybe its too much - if its decent quality, maybe too little. Samples will assist the discussion.

SquirrelPower

« Reply #35 on: April 16, 2016, 06:50 »
+1
My advice on setting prices is to get some business plan software or do same on paper, fill it all out and include everything including profit that you need to make, all costs and expenses including taxes, insurance, health care, every little expense including paper clips and of course the cost of replacing your gear when it comes to end of life cycle and then you will know what you need to charge for the product you are producing and selling and anything less is a road to bankruptcy.

Many on Pond5 are getting $399 per 4K clip, before all sales stopped in March but that's what it was selling for. 


 

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