MicrostockGroup Sponsors


Author Topic: Pond 5 review changes  (Read 34587 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

« Reply #100 on: March 29, 2016, 04:37 »
0
Copyright lawsuit upon P5 that is taking place is a huge pressure to speed things up and grab some money for themselves asap.
https://www.pacermonitor.com/public/case/9470397/Hempton_v_Pond5,_Inc_et_al

So, be considerate, they can't think of us now...when they got to defend their own being and not so happy investors.
Not sure good IPO/Acquisition can happen under lawsuit going on.

Remember what happened after Revostock lawsuit.
« Last Edit: March 29, 2016, 04:55 by KnowYourOnions »


« Reply #101 on: March 30, 2016, 06:05 »
0
Review times suck and I started getting a few rejections here and there, but can't complain about sales.

« Reply #102 on: April 02, 2016, 16:21 »
+7
I had a long discussion via email with them on their review problems and they just blew me off.  I think it is time I part ways with Pond5, not that they will care or even notice, but purely on the principle that what they are doing is just bad business practice and a waste of my time.

How it all started:

1.  I purposely submitted and extremely sharp image of an Anhinga( bird).
2.  It was rejected for focus
3.  I called them on it
4.  They sent me bad an unsharp part of the image where the depth of field had shifted.
5.  When I submitted the eye of the bird and head at 100% and totally sharp they just dropped the conversation.  They knew I was right but didn't want to back off their decision.  That my friends is just bad business.

stockVid

« Reply #103 on: April 02, 2016, 16:46 »
+1
I had a long discussion via email with them on their review problems and they just blew me off.  I think it is time I part ways with Pond5, not that they will care or even notice, but purely on the principle that what they are doing is just bad business practice and a waste of my time.

How it all started:

1.  I purposely submitted and extremely sharp image of an Anhinga( bird).
2.  It was rejected for focus
3.  I called them on it
4.  They sent me bad an unsharp part of the image where the depth of field had shifted.
5.  When I submitted the eye of the bird and head at 100% and totally sharp they just dropped the conversation.  They knew I was right but didn't want to back off their decision.  That my friends is just bad business.

Sorry that sucks.

Obviously, what they are looking for is something entirely in focus with no depth of field.

« Reply #104 on: April 02, 2016, 17:09 »
+6
Its amazing how much negativity they are spreading in such a short time. Just a few weeks or three months ago people were only complaining about long review times, but otherwise were satisfied with pond5. You can always use more sales, but people felt at home.

Now there isnt a single board where people are not complaining bitterly.

Who is now in charge of pond5? Do they now have a management that has never worked in the stock industry?

Instead of changing everything, why didnt they add an additional site to experiment with and then very gradually implement what works on pond5, after discussing it carefully with contributors?

Why drive people to explore the competition? I dont understand their goals at all.

Shutterstock, Videoblocks and Adobe are probably ordering champagne every week, this is an unexpected gift for them. And if istock had vision, they would use this opportunity to announce a new royalty system to attract all the content that has avoided them.
« Last Edit: April 02, 2016, 17:19 by cobalt »

« Reply #105 on: April 02, 2016, 17:42 »
+5
Its amazing how much negativity they are spreading in such a short time. Just a few weeks or three months ago people were only complaining about long review times, but otherwise were satisfied with pond5. You can always use more sales, but people felt at home.

Now there isnt a single board where people are not complaining bitterly.

Who is now in charge of pond5? Do they now have a management that has never worked in the stock industry?

Instead of changing everything, why didnt they add an additional site to experiment with and then very gradually implement what works on pond5, after discussing it carefully with contributors?

Why drive people to explore the competition? I dont understand their goals at all.

Shutterstock, Videoblocks and Adobe are probably ordering champagne every week, this is an unexpected gift for them. And if istock had vision, they would use this opportunity to announce a new royalty system to attract all the content that has avoided them.

I would love this to happen but I can't recall a time where they did anything in favor of the contributor.  The only thing is that if they realize the delta between revenue loss that's linked to how much profit they are losing.  They are reaming us with horrible commissions, so a lot of people pulled content and no longer upload there. But what if they recognize this?  By increasing royalties to some higher level, they attract more content that ultimately yields higher gross margins.  The problem is that they would never offer royalties that even comes close to competing with P5. 
« Last Edit: April 03, 2016, 18:32 by Mantis »

« Reply #106 on: April 03, 2016, 17:52 »
+5
This would be a perfect time for istock to announce 30% for all content or at least for 4k non exclusive content. But it wont happen because it would be a logical thing to do...

All the agencies are in a race who will be first to have 1 million 4k files.

Pond5 is making sure, it wont be them - 2 months review time, random rejections, including whole batches and they have the audacity to suggest the artist should write to support for a "second" opinion, while the first reviewer was too lazy to even look at the file...

Uploading video is a lot of work, if they dont want to have the largest library, somebody else will. Micromanaging portfolios and driving people towards the competition, only benefits the competition.

« Reply #107 on: April 04, 2016, 10:35 »
+2
Let's hope, new posh office on Park Ave. in Manhattan will inspire curators to work harder.
 8)

ACS

« Reply #108 on: April 04, 2016, 13:13 »
+1
Let's hope, new posh office on Park Ave. in Manhattan will inspire curators to work harder.
 8)

Do you really think curators work in this office? Once there was a talk about P5 outsourced curation to an Indian company.

« Reply #109 on: April 04, 2016, 13:54 »
+3
Let's hope, new posh office on Park Ave. in Manhattan will inspire curators to work harder.
 8)

Do you really think curators work in this office? Once there was a talk about P5 outsourced curation to an Indian company.

I was super cynical.
They are all in Czech Rep. 
https://www.facebook.com/groups/720805501262878/?fref=ts

« Reply #110 on: April 08, 2016, 01:57 »
+1
yesterday i had last 7 clips reviewed - 100% rejected.
b.t.w. all of these were 100% accepted at competitive agencies. 2 dl's so far now.

previous batch (actually few batches) were  23/13 in. also 100% in at other agencies.

good thing regarding last batch: at least review time is shortened

« Reply #111 on: April 08, 2016, 04:16 »
+2
I suppose there will be less competition if they reject so much but I still don't get why they haven't gone through the collection and removed all the lower quality clips they accepted in the past.  Having the highest standards now wont make the site more appealing because it was already full of clips that all the other sites would of rejected.

They should communicate with all contributors to let us know exactly what they want now because I don't see the point in uploading if there's a good chance of 100% rejection.  They should also let us know that they are committed to keeping the 50% rate because with so many things changing, that's the last thing left that will make me want to carry on uploading.

« Reply #112 on: April 08, 2016, 04:29 »
+3
Well, Google man just came on board.

Google VP Torrence Boone Joins Pond5 Board as Company Becomes the First Royalty-Free Marketplace to Surpass 5 Million Videos

"As Pond5's team expands, so does its community. The company's commitment to putting artists' needs first is reflected in users' allegiance to Pond5 as their creative platform of choice."

Nice PR sadly doesn't match reality!!!  8)

http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/google-vp-torrence-boone-joins-pond5-board-as-company-becomes-the-first-royalty-free-marketplace-to-surpass-5-million-videos-300248160.html
« Last Edit: April 09, 2016, 07:57 by KnowYourOnions »

« Reply #113 on: April 08, 2016, 10:03 »
0
My number one selling photo on Shutterstock and Fotolia can't get accepted at Pond5. It's rather a mystery, but at least their rejection notices make some sense compared to Fotolia, which just gives you a list of a dozen possible reasons they might reject any photo.

« Reply #114 on: April 08, 2016, 16:14 »
+2
yesterday i had last 7 clips reviewed - 100% rejected.
b.t.w. all of these were 100% accepted at competitive agencies. 2 dl's so far now.

previous batch (actually few batches) were  23/13 in. also 100% in at other agencies.

good thing regarding last batch: at least review time is shortened

*correction (i just checked messages): it's 23/13, 17/19 and 0/7 in. (with 100% at other sites).

i guess it would be fine to remove some of the old not-ever-selling content. - i would not have problem with that at all.
but, my self-artistic-professional-ego is somewhere close to zero :) (which i noticed is not so often).

« Reply #115 on: April 14, 2016, 06:10 »
0
I just had a badge of clips reviewed that were submitted 6 weeks ago, all of them were approved.

« Reply #116 on: April 15, 2016, 09:01 »
0
I too have just had a small batch of clips approved. 13 out of 15 accepted. The two rejections were arguable but not ridiculous as previous batch of rejections had been. Took about 10 days to review. Light at the end of the  tunnel on review policy, or just the luck of the draw on whether one gets a well informed reviewer??

« Reply #117 on: April 21, 2016, 13:41 »
+1
Official reply just in today:

lawrence 21 Apr 2016 16:51
Hey folks! Not sure if I posted in this thread yet. I can confirm that the curators are tightening their acceptance parameters as we grow and evolve. Some pieces of advice from us:

1. Look at the clips from your own batch that were accepted, and use that as a guide for what we are looking for from you.
2. If you feel clips were mistakenly or wrongly rejected, please do write in to support@pond5.com with the clip IDs and why you think there may have been a mistake. We can run them by the curators for a second look. Please be aware that sometimes the decision is final, and each time we send clips for a second review, the queue becomes longer.
3. We realise frustrating things happen when acceptance patameters change. That's why our curation leads are working on a comprehensive guide to add to our Artist Resources - this will be an anvaluable resource and something to help you consider what exactly we're looking for when we curate.

I hope this helps! Please be assured, we value you guys and we want everyone to do well, from the jack of all trades artists to the b roll folks, to the full time stock shot professionals. Building a strong, high quality marketplace with things that are likely to sell will help us all do better.

https://www.pond5.com/community?forum=715&thread=52442241

« Reply #118 on: April 21, 2016, 14:10 »
+11
The way to introduce such drastic changes is to FIRST send out a new style guide or acceptance guide, then give people 3 months to prepare for the changes and shoot new content. And then, only then, very gradually start changing the inspection standards.

At the same time taking in  feedback from community and customers.

To do it like this overnight is unprofessional.

People have invested a lot of time and money into their shootings. This is not a game, it is a business.

You only play with peoples income if you dont appreciate them.

« Reply #119 on: April 21, 2016, 15:22 »
+4
I don't upload new content for a while, sales are at such low level that I don't see any point in investing my time with pond5.I will wait few more months to see what will happen with sales and then decide is it worth to keep my videos there.Past two months sales are 
down almost 75%

« Reply #120 on: April 21, 2016, 16:07 »
+3
My last review was ok, they took nearly everything. I forgot one model release on a file with four people, but can add that.

Nevertheless I find the way they work now very scary and will be careful with uploads.

Too many people reporting huge batches rejected, drastic drop in sales. And that they no longer inspect individual files, just a few testclips and then decide on everything.

So many artists uploaded only or predominantly to pond5. Now everyone is exploring the competition. Just because pond5 gives files a thumbs down, doesnt mean we cant make money with them.

It will be difficult to replace though, it was the only real marketplace the industry had. But in a marketplace the seller controls the port and you dont have to impress the employees with your products.

I really miss the old pond5. It was chaotic yes, but a very caring work environment.

But it is their company, the owners can do whatever they want with it.

It is my own fault that I "specialized" on SS and p5. Should have uploaded to many more agencies to reduce the risk.

« Reply #121 on: April 22, 2016, 00:56 »
0
Its amazing how much negativity they are spreading in such a short time. Just a few weeks or three months ago people were only complaining about long review times, but otherwise were satisfied with pond5. You can always use more sales, but people felt at home.

Now there isnt a single board where people are not complaining bitterly.

Who is now in charge of pond5? Do they now have a management that has never worked in the stock industry?

Instead of changing everything, why didnt they add an additional site to experiment with and then very gradually implement what works on pond5, after discussing it carefully with contributors?

Why drive people to explore the competition? I dont understand their goals at all.

Shutterstock, Videoblocks and Adobe are probably ordering champagne every week, this is an unexpected gift for them. And if istock had vision, they would use this opportunity to announce a new royalty system to attract all the content that has avoided them.

To be fair there's one person that has been complaining at every opportunity about everything Pond5 does and starting threads for the purpose. The problem with this forum is that many of those contributing do nothing other than use it for a sounding board for negativity.

I can't see that things have changed that much in terms of sales or reviews at Pond5. Obviously they're now starting to reject a bit more, but lifting the standards of contributions isn't necessarily a bad thing. I haven't seen complaints from anyone that has a high quality portfolio - if that happens there's more to be alarmed about.

There were some big site changes last month that will have an impact, but its far too early to really know how those will impact sales if at all.

« Reply #122 on: April 22, 2016, 01:28 »
+4
People are complaining on all groups in all languages and you think that one artist is creating these complaints?

They just have to go through their rejection list, every time their curators are not "impressed" and reject a large batch, the artist will complain somewhere. All that negative energy comes from their own actions.

Their rejection list is their karma list.

The artists vent in one of the many public and closed groups in the community. What is being written here and on p5 itself is just the tip of the iceberg. Most community communication went underground after the Getty Google deal and DPC, but the overall activity is the same. If anything, Id say it has increased, because information of who is worth uploading to, is what people live from.

I dont remember p5 ever creating such negative vibe so drastically. They always had a good reputation.

For many sellers 300 dollars a month is a full time income. Might be nothing if you are from New York, but there is a huge world of sellers out there that really feed their family with their stock income.

Again it is their company, they can do whatever they want. I dont think there is anything we can really do. It will be several months until the new management has implemented whatever they want to change and until they acknowledge the impact of what they did.

ETA:

Have you ever heard Amazon or ebay say to their sellers: "We already have too many people selling chairs and your selection does not impress our employees. Please sell these chairs with one of our competitors and we hope you can impress us next time"

No? Because they are marketplaces, they provide a framework but every seller is responsible for their own success.

They never micromanage a sellers port, which is why they have this explosive growth.

If you micromanage, you are not a marketplace.
« Last Edit: April 22, 2016, 02:45 by cobalt »

« Reply #123 on: April 22, 2016, 05:52 »
+1
People are complaining on all groups in all languages and you think that one artist is creating these complaints?

They just have to go through their rejection list, every time their curators are not "impressed" and reject a large batch, the artist will complain somewhere. All that negative energy comes from their own actions.

Their rejection list is their karma list.

The artists vent in one of the many public and closed groups in the community. What is being written here and on p5 itself is just the tip of the iceberg. Most community communication went underground after the Getty Google deal and DPC, but the overall activity is the same. If anything, Id say it has increased, because information of who is worth uploading to, is what people live from.

I dont remember p5 ever creating such negative vibe so drastically. They always had a good reputation.

For many sellers 300 dollars a month is a full time income. Might be nothing if you are from New York, but there is a huge world of sellers out there that really feed their family with their stock income.

Again it is their company, they can do whatever they want. I dont think there is anything we can really do. It will be several months until the new management has implemented whatever they want to change and until they acknowledge the impact of what they did.

ETA:

Have you ever heard Amazon or ebay say to their sellers: "We already have too many people selling chairs and your selection does not impress our employees. Please sell these chairs with one of our competitors and we hope you can impress us next time"

No? Because they are marketplaces, they provide a framework but every seller is responsible for their own success.

They never micromanage a sellers port, which is why they have this explosive growth.

If you micromanage, you are not a marketplace.

My point was that about half the complaints on this forum come from one poster who finds some negative comment to make about anything Pond5 does regardless of what it is. On other forums yes there's some complaints about poor sales and rejections, but there's also plenty of opposite sentiment. Also when i look at the complaints, I see the same people posting in multiple forums and making the same points wherever they go.

If you buy into sales threads for any agencies you'll find the same views at any given time. Best match algorithms change or there's variation in sales - its part of the industry and if your portfolio is at the size or quality where its making $300 a month, its far too small to get any idea as to whether this is normal fluctuation of if something else is going on - change in best match maybe?

I don't check every forum in every language - I don't have time to. The nature of forums and this industry is that people like to talk about their failures and rarely successes. What I read on the Pond5 forum is a mix of people that are happy that there are new standards and those that aren't. The discussion then descends into whether rejections of videos shot at f22 are warranted. The other forum on Pond 5 is a repeat of the same people posting and really only a handful of the same points being made over and over.

The comparison with Ebay and Amazon aren't really relevant, no matter how many times you repeat it. You're never going to have thousands of sellers going out and making their own chairs when they've never made a chair before. Also there's a rating process and way of buyers getting their money back if they get products that aren't up to scratch, which usually involves a cost to the seller in terms of shipping. If you think just anyone can set up shop and list products on Amazon like this, you're mistaken. The other big difference is that these sites are selling to a consumer market, whereas stock agencies are mostly to businesses.

From my perspective I think Pond5 made a mistake in letting through a lot of the content on for so long - in video its much more difficult and time consuming for buyers to sort through thousands of clips and try to find material they want. If they constantly find substandard clips, they'll go somewhere with better curation.

« Reply #124 on: April 22, 2016, 06:28 »
+4
I am not against curation, not at all. But there are many ways to do this and you dont have to interfere with the sellers port to do it. Curation of content and sorting it into different quality or price bands is not a new problem.

There are also advantages to being the one place that has everything, the customer never has to leave.

They can easily let editors comb through the collection and decide what they consider premium. Then give the customer a sort button like they have for membership and voila - only superstock visible! Problem solved!

It also gives a great guide to the community what they are looking for and can inspire people.

And then take time to explain to the community what is their next direction.

If they had told people before that they want to make changes, given examples, had some discussions and explanations, they could have avoided all the emotion they have now.

Many people dont have English as a first language, of course you can say, tough luck, their problem, but what is wrong with working together with people and taking them along on the journey?

Reach out to the community instead of implementing something drastic and not telling anyone? Wouldnt that make more sense?

Only pond5 can control how they are perceived. I really dont think there is anything we can do.

Or are you trying to suggest that it is my fault that artists are having huge batches rejected abruptly?

Isnt it more useful to look for a simple solution instead of blaming individual artists??

« Last Edit: April 22, 2016, 08:14 by cobalt »


 

Related Topics

  Subject / Started by Replies Last post
1 Replies
2088 Views
Last post January 09, 2014, 09:33
by Mantis
11 Replies
11129 Views
Last post June 18, 2014, 10:12
by PeterChigmaroff
0 Replies
1995 Views
Last post August 27, 2014, 12:41
by kentannenbaum
Pond 5 #4

Started by Rinderart Shutterstock.com

9 Replies
2730 Views
Last post December 15, 2015, 15:12
by everest
1 Replies
1261 Views
Last post February 28, 2016, 14:02
by ChrisGardinerPhotography

Sponsors

Microstock Poll Results