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Messages - scottbraut

Pages: [1] 2 3 4 5 6 ... 10
1
Shutterstock.com / Re: Is Scott still at SS?
« on: December 30, 2014, 12:03 »

Thanks everyone for the kind words, I appreciate it!

Best,

Scott

2
Shutterstock.com / Re: Is Scott still at SS?
« on: December 29, 2014, 15:43 »
Thanks Ron!  Good luck as well!  :)

Best,

Scott

3
Shutterstock.com / Re: Is Scott still at SS?
« on: December 29, 2014, 14:52 »
Hi All,
 
I'm currently at Shutterstock, but it is with mixed emotion that I'd like to announce I will be moving on at the end of the year.
 
I joined Shutterstock over five years ago to grow the video business, later taking responsibility for all of Content.  After 20+ years of working around-the-clock in news and photography, Im going to be taking a sabbatical to spend time with my family. After that, with a continued passion for the visual arts and more, I expect to embark on new adventures.   
 
Weve grown a much larger, very talented Content team, including Keren Sachs, Tom Spota, Jennifer Stybel, Vincent Jansen and many more. They are all available to support you.
 
Thank all of you for your contributions!  I look forward to keeping in touch!
 
Best,

Scott
VP of Content
Shutterstock

4
Shutterstock.com / Re: SS sends mass-mail with open adresslist
« on: November 19, 2014, 10:58 »
Hi All,

Regarding the address list, our apologies for the error that was made. We've taken steps to make sure that this doesn't happen again in the future.

Best,

Scott
VP of Content

5
Hi All,

I just wanted to flag this upcoming event with Robb Crocker for you.  It will take place in our office and via Livestream.

Quote
Are you interested in learning more about the business of producing stock footage and increasing your revenue?  If so, you're invited join us on October 23 at Shutterstocks state-of-the-art office in the Empire State Building for an exclusive free event featuring videographer Robb Crocker, author of Stock Footage Millionaire, brought to you by Shutterstock in partnership with ProductionHUB. And if you can't make it in person, you can catch the whole thing via Livestream starting at 7pm EDT.

Based out of Portland, Oregon, Robb produced and directed commercials for brands including Nike, Microsoft, and HP before discovering the world of stock footage. Starting with a single $2 sale in 2007, Crocker and his team built Uberstock, growing a library that has since boasted more than 70,000 purchases, nearly $7 million in revenue, and over $2.7 million in royalties.


http://www.shutterstock.com/blog/youre-invited-to-a-talk-with-stock-footage-millionaire-robb-crocker

Best,

Scott
VP of Content
Shutterstock


6
Computer Hardware / Re: Best monitor for stock photography ?
« on: October 06, 2014, 15:00 »
I haven't tested these for color calibration, but have used them:

http://www.lg.com/us/monitors/lg-34UM95-P-ultrawide-monitor

The extra-wide format is awesome for multi-tasking (having Photoshop, web pages, server directories, etc..., all side-by-side on one screen).  If you're doing a lot of heavy workflow lifting...moving files back and forth, multitasking with multiple applications and windows, etc..., it's an interesting choice.

The only issue is that they can be hard to find, but they do come up on Amazon at the normal retail price from time to time.

Best,

Scott 


7
I understand entirely why an organisation would pay top dollar for a RM image. I don't understand why said organisation would license an RF image on a Microstock agency for $400 when the same image is available for pennies.

Many large organizations (global publishers, advertising agencies, Fortune 500 corporations, retailers, etc....) already have individual employees with Shutterstock accounts, but those individual accounts don't always scale or meet the full needs of their business.  As a result, we work with the larger organization through consolidated enterprise and custom agreements, which can include the option for sensitive use (although few uses would be a sensitive one), additional legal indemnification, extra billing and workflow features and other package attributes that aren't available to subscription or standard license customers to meet the exact needs of their business.  Pricing takes into consideration all of the needs of an individual client.   

Because these are often individually negotiated and designed, we don't go into all of the details, but that's the basic idea. 

Best,

Scott
 

8
Hi Tom,

Thanks for your reply.  I had mentioned the "popular" / search angle in my own post, but please let me clarify.

If you want to maximize earnings, it's important to remember a few things: first, the "popular" search algorithm is driven by a wide variety of factors, not just total quantity of downloads for all time.  Relevance, localization, and many other factors can influence a particular image's search position.  The same goes for the other sort orders.  Each algorithm attempts to use a large quantity of data to meet the best needs of the customer while also utilizing metadata, signals from customer behavior, etc..

I just did a search for "doctor syringe nitrile" and got 13 images while "doctor syringe" turns up 22,000; many of those folks are wearing gloves. So there are definitely ways that contributors can optimize things like metadata to maximize their earnings. And of course, not every buyer might want gloves - but there's the possibility of shooting the model both ways.

The second thing to keep in mind is that Shutterstock serves many of the top publishing companies, advertising agencies, corporations, etc.., in the world who pay for images through custom and enterprise agreements.  Those folks pay up to $400 or more for individual images, compared to what a small business might pay.   If you look at your portfolio through the lens of revenue instead of just downloads, there's plenty of opportunity to capture the dollars they're spending with Shutterstock.   Use the "nitrile" example above.   There's a creative director, designer or art buyer working for a pharma company or major retailer on the other end who looked for that image and entered that keyword and got 13 results.  All of those other contributors may have just missed a $100+ SOD.  Buyers often buy multiple images, so it could have been two or three - imagine $300 for one keyword.

Obviously, these things are going to vary based on what you shoot.  If you're shooting found objects on a white background and you're in a lot of competition with other people doing the same thing, the effect of tweaks might not be obvious.  We always suggest a test-and-learn philosophy in which you use the "custom sets" feature to isolate different attributes of images you think customers might respond to.  Some of the top earners will do that based on subject matter, individual models, etc., to isolate which elements they should apply to future content creation.

Sorry!  Not trying to debate; just trying to be helpful in maximizing earnings potential.  There's what you hear anecdotally on forums, then there's what we see in the actual data and customer behavior, and I'd like to get you that information as much as possible.  :)   
Best,

Scott 





9

Latex gloves are good example.  They are no longer found in use in most hospital or Dr office because of latex allergy.  You will need the newer plastic medical gloves if you want accuracy.  Most don't have tgese lying around the house.   If you just shoot with latex cause its in your cupboard, instead of taking time to research and get proper materials, your photo is of limited use.

Soooooo knew that was coming, but didn't bother to change that reference.  :D :D :D   But yes, you're right, and the point is the same.  It doesn't matter if it's nitrile, latex, etc... -- we talk to a lot of creative directors and image buyers, who say, "it's great - you have tons of musician images, but artists / models need to careful attention to the proper way to hold the instrument. That's the image we'll buy."  :)

Best,

Scott

10
Hello,

I'd respectfully disagree on at least one point. ;D  Everybody started somewhere.  And while there are some people who have a "great eye" or exceptional drawing skills, formal educations, etc..., there's a lot to be said for photo walks, workshops, online education, etc., and a lot of room for growth.  The very top folks are also often the ones who are the most studious about studying content trends, studying the performance of individual models, looking for content gaps in quality or subject matter, etc...  It's not always about money or natural talent. 

Take the syringe example.  A pair of latex gloves  might be something people already have in their closet - there's little incremental cost.  But it could be the difference between a Pharma company licensing your image for $400 or a website designer licensing it for $10.  I've seen images where the choice of depth-of-field made the difference in what image was selected.  Cost and talent: negligible. 

All great news!  But I get that the thread is about opinions on expectations and averages.  :)

Best,

Scott


11
I'll have to see what data we can externalize and how specific I can get, but based on what we see in practice -- I'll make the general point that very small portfolios can have very high earnings and vice-versa.  It often depends on what content you create and how you create it.   

Vector compilations, high-quality model-released shots, conceptual photo illustration, etc., often outperform the average on a per-image basis; "hyperlocal" editorial (a local parade), street photography, or everyday found objects are not going to have the same volume of downloads per image --- that is, unless they've got commercial value (i.e., they fill a content gap) -or- they're better than other images of the same type, etc.  That doesn't mean that they're not going to generate earnings - it just means that you would need more diversity and to think about exceptionalism and quality to achieve the same results.   

I know this seems pretty obvious, but I often talk about how we'll look at individual images and images with similar subject matter and they can perform very differently based on composition, styling, retouching, quality keywording, accuracy, etc.   Sometimes surprisingly so. That's great news, because it suggests that there's quite a bit under an individual artist's control to increase their quantity of downloads even if you had the exact same models, cameras, and location as the artist next to you.  While not the entire picture, the issue then becomes education, which is something we're making increasing investments in to help contributors understand which image and video qualities drive the most downloads.

For example, take an image of a child getting an injection from a doctor.  Is the child looking at the camera, at the doctor, or away?  Is the doctor wearing accurate, protective gloves?  Where is the center of focus?  The child?  The doctor?  The syringe?  Is there room for text?  Is the color palette based on bright colors or pastels?  Is the shot being administered in a home, office, or hospital? Is there professional medical equipment in the background? What color are the scrubs?  Is the doctor's protective clothing applied correctly? Does the setting look North American, European, or Asian? Does the scene, lighting, etc..., look natural or manufactured?

The "popular" search sometimes isn't a good proxy for identifying these important attributes, because a major Pharma company paying $400 per image for (4) images for a corporate report is going to have different expectations than a freelance web designer creating a website for a local doctor's office, but these details can definitely matter in terms of overall revenue performance. 


Best,

Scott
VP of Content
Shutterstock



12
Shutterstock.com / Re: How are sales going?- Shutterstock
« on: September 06, 2014, 09:35 »
Hi guys,

Rinder -- yes, we're honest and open the forums and try to be helpful as much as possible; I've addressed quite a bit of the search topic both here and in the SS forum.  We did presentations on search at MicrostockExpo and PACA last year as well.  We sometimes may have to generalize because of the number of variables and complexity of the algorithms (or the topic), there isn't enough info to answer thoroughly at the time, etc.   As a public company, our financials are public, as are our download numbers. We also get audited by leading accounting firms. We're out in the community under our own names publicly and anyone can come meet with us at events, talk directly by phone and email, etc.  We have contributors who visit us at the office as well.  There are dozens of ways to get information from us.  We're trying to be very transparent.

Gbalex - you're right.  A particular bug or feature may or may not be that big, but it comes down to prioritization. There are three reasons why a bug might not get fixed:  a) because of other priorities that are expected to deliver more value to contributors or customers; b) because it couldn't be reliably reproduced or is limited in scope; or c) because we're expecting to replace that area of the code entirely in an upcoming release.

So, for example, one thing that our contributor team has been working on has been additional site languages - we just released Brazilian Portuguese as the first of new languages.  We have (many) thousands of existing Shutterstock contributors whose native language is not English and many who apply. Our goal is to be accommodating of them in their own language. 

On a daily basis, the process of prioritization basically answers the following question:  what would you do first?  Make an improvement that drives more downloads for contributors overall (and therefore, more royalty dollars to them)?  Make the site available in the native language of our thousands of non-native-English speakers? New payment methods? New forum software? Fix the Top 50? How many contributors would benefit? How big is the effort? What teams need to be involved?  Is that area of the site due for a larger upgrade - will an issue get fixed as part of another feature release? 

Some improvements have to be prioritized first as part of growth, and others are prioritized based on what we believe -- based on contributor feedback -- will benefit the most contributors over the short- and long-run.  There's a lot more to come.  ;)

I do believe there's more we can do to expose some of that externally.
 

Best,

Scott
VP of Content
Shutterstock


 



 

13
Shutterstock.com / Re: How are sales going?- Shutterstock
« on: September 04, 2014, 22:51 »
Hello,

To learn more about our search methods and philosophies, please see this thread (scroll down) and this thread.

To clear up some of the rumors:

  • We don't cap earnings. 
  • The "top image" reports need fixing as we update areas of the site; there was nothing intentionally turned off. This issue is in the backlog and something that gets considered relative to other development priorities.   
  • Our algorithms are targeted and optimized towards delivering the best individual images and videos to customers based on how they respond (i.e., do they download and purchase more); portfolios aren't promoted or penalized. 

Portfolio size is really just one factor of many in terms of having successful earnings.  Certain image categories are much more covered (or competitive) than others, so portfolio diversity; keyword quality and amount; upload timing; supplying fresh content (customers look for it); having something unique about your images in terms of subject matter / quality / keywording, etc. -- they're all factors that can result in one portfolio having more consistent success than another. 

Best,

Scott
VP of Content
Shutterstock

14
General Stock Discussion / Re: BigStock putting wrong name on check
« on: September 04, 2014, 21:09 »
Hi Vanillanz,

I went ahead and reached out to one of our Accounting team leads.  That person already got back to me and said they're going to look into it in the AM.  You should hear back soon.

Best,

Scott
VP of Content
Shutterstock

15
Bigstock.com / Re: Big Stock - How to Stop Partner Sales?
« on: September 04, 2014, 13:36 »
Hi Pixart,

You should contact Bigstock support, but it can take a week for images to be removed from Partner sites, and then some amount of time for partner sales to be fully cleared and reflected in your earnings (Support can give you better guidance - that's mentioned on the Commissions page).  Are you still seeing your content on these sites?  It may be delayed reporting and the removal request may have already been processed.  The best way to find out is to work with Support directly.

http://help.bigstockphoto.com/hc/en-us/articles/200115279-Can-I-opt-out-of-partner-sales-

Best,

Scott
VP of Content
Shutterstock

16
Can you show us an expample for sensitive use? Kind of a broad term, I would be interested in what it means in the real world, a real example of course.

I don't have one handy, but there are lots of theoretical examples: one example could be an image of a senior citizen used for a pharmaceutical ad about Alzheimer's medication.

A sensitive use might cause a reasonable person to believe that the subject of the image suffers from a physical or mental health condition; endorses, advocates, or believes in a particular product, service, cause or opinion; or is otherwise associated with an issue that some might consider controversial or unflattering.

So, for example, a major consumer retailer, pharma company or advertising agency that sometimes creates material related to prescription drugs, physical or mental ailments, etc., might want to have a set of licenses that allow them the flexibility to use images of people in a sensitive way - but not every use that they have would be a sensitive one (very few might fall under that category). 

The important thing is that by being opted into sensitive use, you're opted into all enterprise licenses of the type that pay $75, $120 or more, even if very few would result in an actual sensitive use.

Best,

Scott


17
Hello,

These higher royalty sales are the result of enterprise agreements with large companies and advertising agencies.  Typically, they work with Shutterstock through negotiated agreements, which can include things like the option for sensitive use (although very few uses would be a sensitive one), additional legal indemnification, extra workflow features, etc., to meet the exact needs of their business.   As a result, they're paying higher fees and contributors receive higher royalties. 

We have an increasing number of relationships that come to us through such custom agreements, which result in higher royalties paid out to contributors.   Those customers are typically major publishing houses, major advertising agencies, and Fortune 500 companies around the world (among others).

Best,

Scott
VP of Content
Shutterstock

18
Shutterstock.com / Re: SS not reporting sales? - Solved
« on: August 29, 2014, 11:38 »
Yeah, the trick there is that as you get closer to the event, search traffic can rise, but so can competition for a particular topic.  I think the key thing is to figure out how to best time your uploads, but also do something different / better, with robust and high quality keywords.  Customers can pick out things that are exceptional, different or unique, even within highly covered topics, and the quality keywording ensures that you've covered the bases.   It's amazing - you can see it in the download numbers - one image of [insert highly covered topic here] can get thousands of downloads while others of the exact same topic will get dozens.   It's because one contributor did more with styling, keywording, image quality, timing, etc..., and customers respond to that image over the others. 

The other important thing to note is that with 1 million customers - we're getting millions upon millions of searches.  There's still a ton of demand.  Some topics (Christmas, arrow icons, etc.) can be highly covered, but there are lots of others that aren't.


-S.

19
Shutterstock.com / Re: SS not reporting sales!
« on: August 29, 2014, 11:31 »

Hi Scott,

Does "upload timing" have more to do with seasonality? If not can you elaborate?


It could be due to seasonality, or a variety of other factors.   For example, "Christmas" search traffic begins in September or October, so you need to decide whether you want to capitalize on print publications or other paper-based products and retailers who might be putting layouts together months in advance, or digital buyers who are looking for images closer to the event itself.  Like any business in an open marketplace, you also need to think about how you're differentiating yourself from other sellers in the market.  If every other contributor is uploading Christmas ornaments in December, what are you doing differently in terms of timing, content or keywords?

Similarly, weight loss topics tend to peak in January as people make their New Years resolutions.     

If you're porting a full portfolio from another site, for example, and then put 3,000 images on all subjects up on the site all at once on a Friday afternoon in late July, that's not as thoughtful as spacing your uploads apart and trying to align peak customer traffic with differentiation and demand for your content. 

With 1 million customers, we often encourage contributors to treat the marketplace as a great place for doing their own testing.  Use Custom Sets and try uploading different topics at different times; pay attention to seasonality; watch Google Trends and try different topics out; space your uploads apart, etc.   Again, the contributors who do that tend to outperform those that don't. 

This list is very basic, but if you think about how some of those topics align with seasonality, that's the gist.

Again - sorry - I know some of this is basic, but it definitely helps.

Best,

Scott



20
Shutterstock.com / Re: SS not reporting sales!
« on: August 29, 2014, 09:07 »
Hi GnirtS,

An individual contributor could be affected by a single tweak to the algorithm, but experiments are generally pretty small in terms of exposure to the customer user base, and as mentioned, our algorithm is constantly maturing. Performance should be viewed over many experiments, and in the sense that downloads are gradually increasing across the entire business, it should almost always be a net positive over time as the customer base expands - there are over 1 million customers looking for images at Shutterstock, and as mentioned, we've passed 400 million paid downloads.

We study a lot of data and individual portfolio performance, and what I've found is that the things that affect performance in a far greater way are often things that you have control over (keywording, image quality, aesthetics, upload regularity, upload timing, subject matter, etc.).   There are many portfolios and individual images that will outperform based on the latter.  Sometimes, surprisingly so - images with the same subject matter can see huge differences in downloads based on how they were keyworded, composed, retouched, etc.   

Best,

Scott


21
Shutterstock.com / Re: SS not reporting sales!
« on: August 29, 2014, 08:45 »
Hi guys,

Sorry for the delay, but we put together a high-level FAQ addressing some questions raised in this and other threads.  Doing this FAQ- or article-style is sometimes more practical than addressing lots of individual variations of similar questions, but hopefully this sheds some light on the questions raised.  Part of this is a re-post from a thread at SS; but I've also added info specific to the topics in this thread.

Understanding Search
 
We often get asked how our search rankings work.  The first important thing to note is that there isnt one singular search and discovery experience at Shutterstock.  In addition to the core search experience at Shutterstock.com, we have Palette, Instant, Spectrum, and People search; mobile apps like our iPad app; as well as different sort orders such as New, Popular, Relevant, and Undiscovered. We also have Bigstock and Offset. There are many ways for customers to get to your images, including direct visits from Google, and many ways for them to filter the collection for specific file types like vectors or video. We localize our results for specific countries as well - i.e., it makes sense for Japanese customers searching in Japanese to see the most appropriate results for their own language. 
 
Our search rankings are complex and based on a number of factors. Keywords, freshness, and popularity (downloads) all factor into search results.  We focus on providing customers with the best image that matches their needs and we dont favor specific contributors or portfolios. Location can be a factor when the search query calls for it (for example, streets of New York), or when region-specific results are appropriate.   
 
We believe that if we always match the best possible media with a customer, over time this will lead to more satisfied customers, and in the end more downloads (and more royalties) for our contributors. That belief has delivered over 400 million paid image licenses to date. 
 
How is my media ranked in each sort order? 

The Shutterstock search engine uses a wide variety of factors to match a customer with the media he or she is looking for.  This engine is tuned to generate four types of search experiences, or sort orders: New, Popular, Relevant, and Undiscovered.  You can think of a sort order as a customized version of the core search experience.   

The algorithm that powers the Relevant sort order tries to find the best match between what a customers needs and the media that best serves those needs.  To do this we leverage a wide variety of factors, including how well the query matches the keywords, but also factors such as downloads or other data.  There is no one factor that dictates the position media will appear in the search results; rather, it is a combination of many different factors.

The New sort order is a subset of the Relevant sort order, but with an emphasis toward newer content.  Older content can and does appear in the New sort order, but will be ranked lower than relevant newer content. 

The Popular sort order is similar to Relevant, but it factors downloads much more strongly than the Relevant sort order.  However, highly relevant content with less downloads will still rank well than less relevant content with lots of downloads.

Finally, the Undiscovered sort order is similar to the Relevant sort order, filtered so as to only include results with zero downloads. 

Why is my media not showing up higher in the popular sort order even if I have more downloads?

The Popular sort order leverages downloads and other customer signals to boost popular results higher than they would appear in the Relevant sort order.  While downloads is a significant factor, it is not the only factor, and a very good relevance match will take precedence.  Also, media that is ranked well in one query will not necessarily be ranked well in another.  For example, a family at the dinner table might rank quite highly for the query Family, but not as high for the query Family at the Beach, even if it has more downloads than higher ranked photos in that query. 

Why is my photo with zero downloads not showing up in undiscovered? 

The Undiscovered sort order is similar to the Relevant sort order, filtered so that all results have zero downloads.  Depending on whether the results above have downloads, for each query media with zero downloads will appear in the same or better position as the Relevant sort order.  If your media doesnt appear in the Relevant sort order it wont appear in the Undiscovered sort order either. Like all sort orders, the search result position will depend primarily on how well the query matches to the media. 

Sometimes theres a delay in the time it takes for our algorithms to register a download, and media will briefly remain in the undiscovered sort order even after it has been downloaded. 

Image Gallery Stats

The Image Gallery Stats page as been in beta and can include preview or comp images provided to trusted companies like major advertising agencies for consideration for purchase.  Weve discussed those images elsewhere in public forums, but those preview downloads are part of enterprise agreements where customers are paying up to hundreds of dollars for a license once they select an image for actual use or purchase (with royalties of up $120 or more).  There is no usage license granted until the buyer purchases the image.  Preview or Comp images for these types of enterprise buyers are very common in the stock industry. Shutterstock contributors earn much higher royalties for downloads when an actual purchase is made.

Its important to note that your Earnings Summary is the primary place to find your paid downloads; the Image Gallery Stats page should not be used for that purpose.

Download Map

The Download map shows an assortment of recent customer downloads of your images, which could include preview images (see above) and redownloads.  The location on the map is an approximation, due to the size of the map and other considerations. Like gallery stats, the download map should be looked at as a source of interesting information, not the place to derive highly precise information about your downloads and earnings.

About Testing, and Making Changes Thoughtfully
 
Search is powered by a set of services that include machine-learning algorithms: a type of software that is able to improve over time. In a very simple sense, the goal of an algorithm is maximize downloads. To get the right media in front of a customer, the algorithm takes many factors into account, such as how well the keyword matches a search query, or the past success of this particular photo, music clip, or video.  For some search queries, customers are looking for newer content or content that has not been used before, and the algorithm will leverage factors such as the age of the media; for other queries, age is less important.  There are many, many other factors that the algorithm takes into account, and we are adding more every day.  One of the ways we improve our algorithm over time is to add new factors.  We are also frequently making small changes in how the algorithm weighs these factors.
 
In practice, some of the changes we make dont always work out for the best, so when we make a change, we need a way of knowing if its a good idea.  We achieve this through an experimentation process called A/B testing.  In an A/B test, a typically small amount of our customer base is put into an experiment in which weve changed the algorithm, and well measure how well it performs relative to a control group.  There are often many such experiments going on at Shutterstock, and its probable that youve been in more than one if you are a regular Shutterstock user.  If a change results in more downloads or improvements in other key metrics, it will usually find its way into the production experience.  If not, well move on and try something else.  You can think of the process a little like evolution we are constantly getting slightly better through a process of trial and error in very small amounts. In general, we will only ship an algorithm change if it results in more downloads, and thus more income for our contributors. 


Best,

Scott
VP of Content
Shutterstock

22
Shutterstock.com / Re: SS not reporting sales!
« on: August 22, 2014, 15:15 »
Hello All,

Thanks for your questions.

A royalty payment is made for every paid license of Shutterstock product. One of the benefits of working with Shutterstock is that, as a publicly-traded company on the New York Stock Exchange, we are audited by major accounting firms.  Our downloads, licenses, and royalty payouts go through multiple layers of scrutiny to ensure that they are correct, and the officers of the company certify the results of those audits as our financial numbers are reported to the public.

As far as the sort orders are concerned, I'm looking into it, but [I believe] what you're seeing is potentially the result of search testing.  Search tests are typically run with a small percentage of the user population.  If a test results in more customer downloads, it would be adopted more broadly.  The goal of testing is to increase customer downloads, which ultimately delivers more royalties to contributors. 

Best,

Scott
VP of Content
Shutterstock 

23
Cameras / Lenses / Re: Best SLR/DSLR for video and stills
« on: August 16, 2014, 13:34 »
Canon 5d Mark III
Panasonic GH4

+1

I love the low light capability of the 5D - with an image-stabilized lens, it feels extremely versatile.  Had a 7D and couldn't stand it.  Not sure if I got a lemon, but the focus and control I feel with the 5D is so much better.   Not a fan of DSLR size, noise, loupes for video, etc., but they can be hard to beat for overall capability.

24
Laurin,

If you have questions, just ask in the forum.

- Scott


25
Hi Gbalex,

Thanks.  You're absolutely right.  Actions *do* speak louder than words.  And the fact is, our team is one of the few teams out there right now in external forums, in international forums, traveling to different countries to speak to contributors, sponsoring big events, nurturing international communities and encouraging connectivity between artists, creating grant programs, and bringing contributors in for product research to hear their opinions and act on them.  We're making more investments in contributor education and community than ever before. 

There has been very little active moderation in the Shutterstock forums over the years and it's reasonable to moderate forums.  Leaf does it here. We're going to do it in our own forums.  There are plenty of threads where people have expressed their opinions and thoughts in a constructive way.   

Best,

Scott

 
 





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