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Author Topic: Approaching publications directly with my image  (Read 28890 times)

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niktol

« Reply #25 on: May 24, 2017, 10:17 »
0
I don't know about one specific image, but if one decides to choose the route of scientific illustrations, I would not bother with journals but contact universities and even research labs for work. Some labs do not mind having artwork done for them and pay a reasonable price, particularly those that publish in prestigious magazines or make keynote presentations. I would say that some scientific knowledge of the subject would be very welcome. Disclaimer - I've never done that myself, but I know people who did, typically scientists themselves with some inclination to artistic expression :).


« Reply #26 on: May 25, 2017, 08:40 »
0
I would not bother with journals but contact universities and even research labs for work. Some labs do not mind having artwork done for them and pay a reasonable price, particularly those that publish in prestigious magazines or make keynote presentations.

Very interesting suggestion. I'll try contacting some University science departments and research labs. Previously, I wasn't aware of the term 'keynote presentations' - looks kind of like a powerpoint presentation to me. Just curious about the kind of license that would be appropriate for such presentations.

The other thing is I wonder if surface tension would be covered in that level of science (University level etc.) I do get the impression that it's rather basic science

niktol

« Reply #27 on: May 25, 2017, 09:13 »
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Very interesting suggestion. I'll try contacting some University science departments and research labs. Previously, I wasn't aware of the term 'keynote presentations' - looks kind of like a powerpoint presentation to me. Just curious about the kind of license that would be appropriate for such presentations.


Keynote presentation is a powerpoint presentation made at a start of a conference with the purpose to set its central theme. It is possible that the presenter will want an exclusive use with the possibility to transfer copyrights to a journal where a scientific review on the subject will be published. However, I can envision a request for a cheaper alternative. Like I said, I've never done it myself, so my knowledge is limited, but I know people who sell such services. For whatever reason they are a bit secretive about that aspect of their income.

Noedelhap

  • www.colincramm.com

« Reply #28 on: May 25, 2017, 09:15 »
+3
Wow. I'm assuming you've made some groundbreaking photograph that's going to make you rich and publishers should consider themselves lucky to get the once-in-a-lifetime opportunity of publishing your very unique image.

....Otherwise I don't understand why you're spending your time on two different threads discussing your detailed plans to distribute it.

You're overthinking this. Too much hassle for just one picture. You should get rid of the idea that your picture is unique. It probably isn't and if it was, you should already have done something with it after two months.

« Reply #29 on: May 25, 2017, 10:02 »
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It is possible that the presenter will want an exclusive use with the possibility to transfer copyrights to a journal where a scientific review on the subject will be published.

Yea I certainly wouldn't want to hand over exclusive rights. I'm hoping there are some other options with regards to presentations.

..and publishers should consider themselves lucky to get the once-in-a-lifetime opportunity of publishing your very unique image.

I wouldn't say this image is unique. And I admit that earlier, I was wrong for calling it rare. Though on the other hand, it's not overly common.

you should already have done something with it

Ive been submitting the image to various publications along with a proposed article. The last e-mail was sent several minutes ago to an Australian magazine.

« Reply #30 on: June 12, 2017, 21:11 »
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One of the publications that I submitted to was not a science magazine as such. They cover all sorts of themes and topics - mostly nature related but also cultural as well. They informed me that they don't have any immediate use for my image though they did state that if they ever need to demonstrate this aspect of physics, they will be in touch with me. I'm also going to contact some publishers of science / physics textbooks with the aim of getting a rights managed deal.

namussi

« Reply #31 on: June 22, 2017, 06:01 »
+1
Any updates?

« Reply #32 on: June 26, 2017, 11:32 »
+1
Any updates?

Ive had one magazine editor tell me in his own words: "It's a good photo" but they're not interested. And another editor in another magazine who said they only accept free content (no payment.)

There's also my previous update.
« Last Edit: June 27, 2017, 04:08 by dragonblade »

« Reply #33 on: October 19, 2017, 21:40 »
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Ive contacted a university research department and they got back to me this morning. The associate professor from the department said that he's writing a book and working with a publisher and he might be able to use my image in about a month's time (he's still deciding whether to go with an illustrated version of the book or a text-only version.)

When I initially contacted the department at the university, I was open to the idea of them using my image in electronic presentations in seminars and lectures etc. In that kind of scenario, it would be the department who would be paying me for the usage of the image. I mentioned to them that I would be happy to negotiate the amount with them. I also mentioned that I was open to discussing other potential uses of the image as well.

With the publishing of this book, the publisher is not sourcing the image from a stock agency or from me so I doubt I'll see money from them. Ive heard that with a number of science publications, the author simply supplies the images. Looks like that's the scenario here.

At this stage, I don't even know if I'm going have any direct contact with the publisher. I'm assuming that all correspondence will be done through the professor. If any money comes into my hands, it will probably be from the university department so I wouldn't expect much in the way of $$. In any case, it would be good to find out how long my photo is going to be published in the book (if it is included.) That will determine when I can upload the photo to Alamy as Rights Managed if I choose to go that route one day. Though I guess I could upload it as RF in the meantime?

With Alamy, I wonder if you can have RM licenses that are only available to certain geographical regions. That would be one way that I could still license the image as RM to other clients if my photo is used in the book and it's restricted to a certain part of the world (unless the book is published world wide.)

This is assuming that I would retain my rights to the image (which I will definitely try to do.)
« Last Edit: October 20, 2017, 01:27 by dragonblade »

ShadySue

  • There is a crack in everything
« Reply #34 on: October 20, 2017, 05:19 »
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You can still sell the file RM on Alamy. They very seldom get requests for RM exclusivity and if you do, you tell them the use and it may or may not conflict with that request.

Until the new upload manager at the beginning of this year, you could have geographical restrictions, but apparently having done this for years, they have stopped, as "buyers found it too confusing" - young people, eh?  ;D

« Reply #35 on: October 20, 2017, 15:52 »
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Sue, that's great to hear. I assume I'd inform Alamy rather than the client about the specific uses of the image? Just like the micro sites, I guess contributors don't have direct contact with the clients.

Some buyers were finding geographical restrictions too confusing? My gosh, the world is a sad place.

ShadySue

  • There is a crack in everything
« Reply #36 on: October 20, 2017, 16:00 »
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Sue, that's great to hear. I assume I'd inform Alamy rather than the client about the specific uses of the image? Just like the micro sites, I guess contributors don't have direct contact with the clients.

Some buyers were finding geographical restrictions too confusing? My gosh, the world is a sad place.

Yes, Alamy would contact you. Have to say I've only been contacted a couple of times, and it never led to anything, and that's a regular story. Still, sometimes it works.

Conversely, although you can opt out of novel use (if it's still around[?], the UKNS and/or distribution, there's no way of shielding your most unique image from other buyers with a heavy discount. You can opt out of Personal Use too, but then the buyer could buy for presentation use.

Just so that you are fully aware.

« Reply #37 on: October 21, 2017, 04:45 »
+1
Ive contacted a university research department and they got back to me this morning. The associate professor from the department said that he's writing a book and working with a publisher and he might be able to use my image in about a month's time (he's still deciding whether to go with an illustrated version of the book or a text-only version.)

Why is it that I just don't find this credible?

derek

    This user is banned.
« Reply #38 on: October 21, 2017, 05:06 »
+1
An image like that dont really need to be RM, there are thousands of them, tension water, oil, air etc. I recon you get around $10 for an inside shot in a scientific publication no more.
I once shot a bomb detonation in the pacific as a military experiment! it was huge and awsome. This was in the good old film days and I got 2 grand for it. Today I would probably get around $100 no more.

I suggest you put it up as micro! 

« Reply #39 on: October 21, 2017, 05:37 »
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An image like that dont really need to be RM, there are thousands of them, tension water, oil, air etc.

There would indeed be thousands of photos demonstrating surface tension. Though I haven't found all that many like mine, and certainly none in any of the stock agencies Ive looked through.

I once shot a bomb detonation in the pacific as a military experiment! it was huge and awsome. This was in the good old film days

That would have been an awesome experience. Must have been a big bomb...hope it wasn't anything like Bikini Atoll?

niktol

« Reply #40 on: October 21, 2017, 06:23 »
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With the publishing of this book, the publisher is not sourcing the image from a stock agency or from me so I doubt I'll see money from them. Ive heard that with a number of science publications, the author simply supplies the images. Looks like that's the scenario here.


Sounds right to me. The author provides artwork, and he's responsible for its accuracy. The copyright is then transferred to the publisher. Make sure the terms of the transfer do not interfere with your decision to sell the image commercially elsewhere or seek proper compensation for an exclusive sale.  Professors may not be fully aware of legalities and their implications.
« Last Edit: October 21, 2017, 06:25 by niktol »

« Reply #41 on: October 21, 2017, 06:27 »
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Sounds right to me. The author provides artwork, and he's responsible for its accuracy. The copyright is then transferred to the publisher. Make sure the terms of the transfer do not interfere with your decision to sell the image commercially elsewhere or seek proper compensation.  Professors may not be fully aware of legalities and their implications.

Thanks for clarifying that. I'll definitely tell the professor to let the editor know that I want to retain my full rights to the image.
« Last Edit: October 21, 2017, 06:50 by dragonblade »

« Reply #42 on: October 21, 2017, 06:57 »
+1
Sounds right to me. The author provides artwork, and he's responsible for its accuracy. The copyright is then transferred to the publisher. Make sure the terms of the transfer do not interfere with your decision to sell the image commercially elsewhere or seek proper compensation.  Professors may not be fully aware of legalities and their implications.

Thanks for clarifying that. I'll definitely mention to the professor that I want to retain my full rights to the image and to let the publisher know that.

Someone buying usage rights from you can't impose restrictions on you that you haven't agreed to. So this client would not be able to supply the image to a third party with any sort of added restriction on your right to do whatever you like with  it.  If he gave any assurances then that would be his problem, not yours.
To the best of my knowledge, the originator of a book provides the text and images to the publisher who then handles the layout which is passed on to the printer for platemaking. The copyright of a book is not transferred to the publisher, it rests with the author of the work (go and look in the front of pretty much any book and you will see the copyright notice). Just as the copyright of a photo doesn't transfer to the user who buys a licences to use the work.
Of course, if you are not going to specify your rights in a written contract signed by the user then anything could happen.

« Reply #43 on: October 21, 2017, 07:16 »
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Of course, if you are not going to specify your rights in a written contract signed by the user then anything could happen.

Okay, you've convinced me to write up a contract. Definitely better than the more casual approach.
« Last Edit: October 21, 2017, 07:56 by dragonblade »

niktol

« Reply #44 on: October 21, 2017, 09:07 »
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The copyright of a book is not transferred to the publisher, it rests with the author of the work (go and look in the front of pretty much any book and you will see the copyright notice). Just as the copyright of a photo doesn't transfer to the user who buys a licences to use the work.


It can be. Depends on how the copyright transfer agreement is written and the policies of a specific publisher.  The copyright may be assigned by the author to another party. Noone can take away authorship of an illustration of course, but a book author can sign the agreement without thinking thus implying that rights for artwork belong to him. It's common practice, because scientists often make their own artwork (or their students do, under the table).

BTW, copyright notices are for those poor souls who decide to copy a book without publisher's permission, it's not not a vanity item for authors. The notice sits right next to the publisher's name. If written out explicitly, it also states that the permission to reproduce has to obtained from the publisher.

dragonblade, here's something to help

https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/symbiartic/so-you-want-to-hire-a-science-illustrator/
« Last Edit: October 21, 2017, 09:28 by niktol »

SpaceStockFootage

  • Space, Sci-Fi and Astronomy Related Stock Footage

« Reply #45 on: October 21, 2017, 20:42 »
+3
Upload it to a bunch of agencies and watch the money roll in. Quite slowly, probably.

I think you've invested a lot more time in this for any returns you might make over and above what you'd get selling it as stock.

« Reply #46 on: October 22, 2017, 08:55 »
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Typically when you write for academia you transfer copyright to the publisher.  The lead author would do that for all other authors and including any images or illustrations.  If that occurred then in the future you would need to get permission from the publisher to use your own image!

If your goal is just exposure then this is a great way to go - just make sure they give you credit, although you might just be in a list of photographers at the beginning.  If you were intending to make some money then probably not, unless the professor agrees to pay you up front.

Here is an example.  For my real job I have to send back final revisions to a book chapter in another week or so.  The chapter will have two illustrations, both of which I made in draft form from information on the web.  I will make the final versions myself for free, one from scratch - will just need to make a graph with different date ranges from the one I copied - and the other will be a modification of a map made by another academic with their permission.  Since I work for the U.S. Government in real life (and am an adjunct Professor at a university) anything I do for the job (not photography!) cannot be copyrighted.  Therefore, I can't even transfer copyright to the publisher and the final version will be in the public domain.  You probably don't want that to happen to one of your images, or have the copyright assigned to someone else.

If you want to maintain control you need to make up a contract specifying exactly what the image can and cannot be used for and what kind of compensation you will receive.  Good luck!

« Reply #47 on: October 22, 2017, 09:38 »
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If you want to maintain control you need to make up a contract specifying exactly what the image can and cannot be used for and what kind of compensation you will receive.  Good luck!

Definitely. Within the contract, I guess I could also include the title of the book, the intended geographical region for distribution and the length of time that the book will be published for?

« Reply #48 on: October 23, 2017, 01:07 »
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I think you've invested a lot more time in this for any returns you might make over and above what you'd get selling it as stock.

I admit I'm getting tired of contacting publishers / university departments etc. Putting the photo up on a stock site's going to be so much easier.

« Reply #49 on: October 23, 2017, 01:45 »
0
I think you've invested a lot more time in this for any returns you might make over and above what you'd get selling it as stock.

I admit I'm getting tired of contacting publishers / university departments etc. Putting the photo up on a stock site's going to be so much easier.
On the other hand look on it as a learning experience and maybe some good contacts made should they ever need a series of pics etc. I must admit I'm pretty crap at marketing/networking which is one of the reasons stock suits me ;-)


 

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