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Author Topic: "Please reset your Shutterstock password" - email from shutterstock (?)  (Read 4140 times)

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« on: July 20, 2016, 11:21 »
0
The email:

"...

To make sure you continue having the most secure experience possible on Shutterstock, were regularly monitoring our site and the Internet to keep your account information safe. As part of this routine monitoring, we discovered a list of email addresses and passwords posted online. While the list was not Shutterstock-related, we know that many customers reuse their passwords on multiple websites.

As a precaution, we would like to validate that your account information is up to date and accurate. We are asking that you login and reset your password on your account.

If you have any additional concerns please contact customer support.

Sincerely

Shutterstock Support

350 Fifth Avenue, 21st Floor
New York, NY 10118 "


the sender is Shutterstock@shutterstockmail.com, which is not one of the domains I usually get my SS mail from - anyone else got this?


« Reply #1 on: July 20, 2016, 11:26 »
+4
I didn't get this e-mail, but that domain was used when they sent out the erroneous "Regarding Repeated Words and Phrases in Image Titles" e-mail last month.

As long as you don't click on any links in the e-mail and go to the SS URL yourself, I can't see a problem resetting your password.

« Reply #2 on: July 20, 2016, 12:08 »
0
the net is riddled with scams and virus-protectors offers,etc..
only yesterday when i used the google search for facebook
and clicked the link, i had a loud voice and memo telling me
my computer has been infected with xxx virus, pls call this number immediately.

had i been some newbie or a person who is not so computer-savvy;
not that i am a guru, i would not have simply CTRL-ALT-DEL
to task master and remove that sh*t .
..
and would have fallen for the scam ... and indeed get a virus.

as joanne said, don't click anything in the email
nor anything like i got ,
other than CTRL ALT DEL  to force-close the page
...(many times, clicking the no, or x box will open the virus too)...

as for ss password, it would do no harm to go back in directly to ss
and change your password. with all that hacking and eff-ups going on at ss
it won't do any harm to update that , for sure.

« Reply #3 on: July 20, 2016, 13:00 »
+2
Yep never click anything in those kind of emails go direct to the site (not via the email). Usually you can spot spelling errors etc. but theres some very plausible Paypal ones about.

« Reply #4 on: July 20, 2016, 13:01 »
0
I haven't gotten that email yet either.

« Reply #5 on: July 20, 2016, 14:06 »
+1
it cant really be phishing if they ask you to login to your account and reset your password,

that email address seems to be their new address from which they send communications

« Reply #6 on: July 20, 2016, 15:07 »
0
was it not ss that had a new connection with linkedIn??
there was an incident about resetting passwords there most recently,
and they too sent out warnings to all to reset their passwords.

it could be related. but no expert here, just wondering.

« Reply #7 on: July 22, 2016, 05:17 »
0
Thanks for the answers, I actually decided to do nothing now. From as much as I could gather there are webpages and online services that track stolen data, and list emails, accounts, etc that could be affected, and that's where SS take their hint from. It mostly means that someone somewhere claims they have access to your email (stolen password) and they put this access up for sale for fraudster (it's often not true at all, they are just defrauding the fraudsters too).

here is something that might help:

http://www.forbes.com/sites/adamtanner/2014/04/14/these-sites-tell-which-of-your-accounts-have-been-hacked/#38bab83a4e8e


« Reply #8 on: July 22, 2016, 22:03 »
+2
Interesting decision. SS warns you personally, and nobody else here gets a warning, your passwords are at risk and your decision is ignore them and do nothing. Is keeping the same password worth that risk?

« Reply #9 on: July 22, 2016, 22:20 »
0
Thanks for the answers, I actually decided to do nothing now. From as much as I could gather there are webpages and online services that track stolen data, and list emails, accounts, etc that could be affected, and that's where SS take their hint from. It mostly means that someone somewhere claims they have access to your email (stolen password) and they put this access up for sale for fraudster (it's often not true at all, they are just defrauding the fraudsters too).

here is something that might help:

http://www.forbes.com/sites/adamtanner/2014/04/14/these-sites-tell-which-of-your-accounts-have-been-hacked/#38bab83a4e8e
Interesting decision. SS warns you personally, and nobody else here gets a warning, your passwords are at risk and your decision is ignore them and do nothing. Is keeping the same password worth that risk?


so you believe everything forbes say???
as yada3 points out, what risk would it be to change your pwd? vs keeping it.

« Reply #10 on: July 23, 2016, 02:17 »
0
Interesting decision. SS warns you personally, and nobody else here gets a warning, your passwords are at risk and your decision is ignore them and do nothing. Is keeping the same password worth that risk?

Because I went a bit further checking and I know what the breach was when it happened and what happened. Actually I did change the password since the "breach", way back, both the email and SS, because it happened in early 2013, and I got a gmail warning of someone logging in to my mailbox from china. It's just that SS found these things in 2016, way later than me. Get it now? :)

« Reply #11 on: July 23, 2016, 02:23 »
0

so you believe everything forbes say???


I'm sorry, beleive what??? The forbes article was pasted for the links it contains, because it has a collection of them. It was for you ppl. I thought it could help if anyone has concerns after reading this. Logic plz.

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« Reply #12 on: July 23, 2016, 02:33 »
+2
it cant really be phishing if they ask you to login to your account and reset your password

It can if there's a link provided in the email to login to your account, and that link takes you to a website that doesn't belong to ShutterStock. As others have said, log in and change your password, no problem... but make sure you go directly to the site, rather than clicking on any links in the email.

« Reply #13 on: July 23, 2016, 05:27 »
0
it cant really be phishing if they ask you to login to your account and reset your password

It can if there's a link provided in the email to login to your account, and that link takes you to a website that doesn't belong to ShutterStock. As others have said, log in and change your password, no problem... but make sure you go directly to the site, rather than clicking on any links in the email.

Correct. Login directly, not from the link in e-mail, change password and set a reminder in your smartphone for date of next password change!
Do the same for all your other logins, commercial or not, always different passwords.

« Reply #14 on: July 23, 2016, 09:28 »
0

so you believe everything forbes say???


I'm sorry, beleive what??? The forbes article was pasted for the links it contains, because it has a collection of them. It was for you ppl. I thought it could help if anyone has concerns after reading this. Logic plz.

i have as much faith in forbes as i do with all those social media millionaires.
but my comment was not to spite you , but more to say what yada3 said,
even if there is no threat, you have to remember LinkedIn and ss were hacked.

you would still be better off to change your password, by going in directly to ss site
and do that.
what forbes say does not help us at all. this is the magazine that writes about
the best place to retire,etc..
no different from those sites you find with "the biggest B**bs on the web", "the fastest way to..",
"the xxx of the xxx",
lots of superlatives to attract traffic ...

even if they themselves have been hacked, they would not even know it LMAO
it's not the Forbes of the old days , anymore than ss is the #1 contributor-confidant agency these days. ss is run by robots riddled with a lot of problems lately.
i would not be surprised if our passwords were in fact hacked.
« Last Edit: July 23, 2016, 09:35 by etudiante_rapide »


 

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