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Author Topic: 111,655 new photos added in the past week  (Read 21772 times)

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« Reply #25 on: January 26, 2010, 16:48 »
0
100,000+ images in one week eh? I wonder how may of them....

- involved subject matter people actually buy



To me, that's the big question.  Why people spend so much time and effort uploading subject matter that either doesn't sell or is so oversaturated that it won't get a chance to sell, is beyond me.  Everyone should check their IS and DT gauges right in this forum as an indicator of whether you're uploading subjects that sell or don't sell.  If your Sales score is higher than your Uploads score, you're probably on the right track.  If not, you may be contributing to the oversupply problem.


« Reply #26 on: January 26, 2010, 16:49 »
0
If your Sales score is higher than your Uploads score, you're probably on the right track.
Clarification... iIf your Sales score is higher (a lower number) than your Uploads score, you're probably on the right track.
« Last Edit: January 26, 2010, 16:53 by PowerDroid »

« Reply #27 on: January 26, 2010, 16:54 »
0
100,000+ images in one week eh? I wonder how may of them....

- involved subject matter people actually buy



To me, that's the big question.  Why people spend so much time and effort uploading subject matter that either doesn't sell or is so oversaturated that it won't get a chance to sell, is beyond me.  Everyone should check their IS and DT gauges right in this forum as an indicator of whether you're uploading subjects that sell or don't sell.  If your Sales score is higher than your Uploads score, you're probably on the right track.  If not, you may be contributing to the oversupply problem.

It's about SS not DT or IS. If there was SS gauge it would show how pathetic are my IS results :-) Also I got 4x more from SS than DT :-)

« Reply #28 on: January 26, 2010, 16:58 »
0

It's about SS not DT or IS.


True, but I'm betting that most if not everyone is submitting the same content (general subject matter) to SS as they do to DT or IS.  
« Last Edit: January 26, 2010, 17:04 by PowerDroid »

RT


« Reply #29 on: January 26, 2010, 18:22 »
0
100,000+ images in one week eh? I wonder how may of them....

or

- dogs dressed up as humans doing things

- portraits that have been put through portrait editing software at the highest level so that they come out looking like a wax doll

- vastly overly saturated landscapes

- b+w conversion of the contributors whole portfolio

- young inexperienced models for whom wearing a suit or dress (of the wrong size)  is a novelty

- clones of the 'most popular images'

or any number of other things that would appear to be encouraged by the 'mentors' on the forum.

« Reply #30 on: January 26, 2010, 18:49 »
0
Once you look at the newest images, if your like me at least, you stop worrying about the "competition" it creates. I'm not gonna get myself tied up in a knot over it :P

« Reply #31 on: January 26, 2010, 20:01 »
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The basic problem is that the current search technology on these sites isn't nearly sophisticated enough to handle 10 million images in any sensible way.   

We all know how bad keywording can be, and how keyword spamming is still rampant, and how unable the micros are to clean that up, in millions of images.

A common problem is the submission (and approval) of numerous mind-numblingly similar versions of the same shot.   The buyer hitting those keywords sees them all, right in a row, filling a page - talk about search fatigue.   But what if, in a case like that, you saw just one image (maybe the most popular one, or one selected by the reviewer) with some sort of "more like this" button beneath it in case you actually wanted to see some variations?

 

« Reply #32 on: January 26, 2010, 21:36 »
0
The basic problem is that the current search technology on these sites isn't nearly sophisticated enough to handle 10 million images in any sensible way.   

We all know how bad keywording can be, and how keyword spamming is still rampant, and how unable the micros are to clean that up, in millions of images.

A common problem is the submission (and approval) of numerous mind-numblingly similar versions of the same shot.   The buyer hitting those keywords sees them all, right in a row, filling a page - talk about search fatigue.   But what if, in a case like that, you saw just one image (maybe the most popular one, or one selected by the reviewer) with some sort of "more like this" button beneath it in case you actually wanted to see some variations?

 

I've been wanting that for a LONG time (especially on Shutterstock), in fact, the last time I was on Alamy, I noticed they have begun doing this. Smart move.

« Reply #33 on: January 26, 2010, 22:10 »
0
The basic problem is that the current search technology on these sites isn't nearly sophisticated enough to handle 10 million images in any sensible way.   

We all know how bad keywording can be, and how keyword spamming is still rampant, and how unable the micros are to clean that up, in millions of images.

A common problem is the submission (and approval) of numerous mind-numblingly similar versions of the same shot.   The buyer hitting those keywords sees them all, right in a row, filling a page - talk about search fatigue.   But what if, in a case like that, you saw just one image (maybe the most popular one, or one selected by the reviewer) with some sort of "more like this" button beneath it in case you actually wanted to see some variations?

 

I've been wanting that for a LONG time (especially on Shutterstock), in fact, the last time I was on Alamy, I noticed they have begun doing this. Smart move.

Getty does this.  I can't tell whether I like it or not, because they try to shove all images from the series underneath one of them.  So you basically get one spot in the return.

« Reply #34 on: January 26, 2010, 23:12 »
0
The basic problem is that the current search technology on these sites isn't nearly sophisticated enough to handle 10 million images in any sensible way.   

We all know how bad keywording can be, and how keyword spamming is still rampant, and how unable the micros are to clean that up, in millions of images.

A common problem is the submission (and approval) of numerous mind-numblingly similar versions of the same shot.   The buyer hitting those keywords sees them all, right in a row, filling a page - talk about search fatigue.   But what if, in a case like that, you saw just one image (maybe the most popular one, or one selected by the reviewer) with some sort of "more like this" button beneath it in case you actually wanted to see some variations?

 

I've been wanting that for a LONG time (especially on Shutterstock), in fact, the last time I was on Alamy, I noticed they have begun doing this. Smart move.

Getty does this.  I can't tell whether I like it or not, because they try to shove all images from the series underneath one of them.  So you basically get one spot in the return.

They could easily solve this with animated thumbnails showing a series of changing images, or they could just randomly select a new shot for each search, but yes I understand what you mean. Perhaps the option could be toggled on and off at user will. Ultimately I think they need to develop more advanced search options that places like iStock have, and even iStock could improve their own search options.

« Reply #35 on: January 27, 2010, 00:34 »
0
100,000+ images in one week eh? I wonder how may of them....
...
- dogs dressed up as humans doing things

Working with dogs doing things is NOT EASY!   Getting good results require lots of time, preparation, and patience. 

The real problem is contributors sending images which are too close to snapshots.

« Reply #36 on: January 27, 2010, 01:38 »
0
100,000+ images in one week eh? I wonder how may of them....
...
- dogs dressed up as humans doing things

Working with dogs doing things is NOT EASY!   Getting good results require lots of time, preparation, and patience. 

The real problem is contributors sending images which are too close to snapshots.



^^^ but they are getting approved. They'd stop submitting them in bulk if they were rejected.

« Reply #37 on: January 27, 2010, 02:04 »
0
100,000+ images in one week eh? I wonder how may of them....
...
- dogs dressed up as humans doing things

Working with dogs doing things is NOT EASY!   Getting good results require lots of time, preparation, and patience. 

The real problem is contributors sending images which are too close to snapshots.



^^^ but they are getting approved. They'd stop submitting them in bulk if they were rejected.


Yes,  unfortunately, SS is approving them! 

« Reply #38 on: January 27, 2010, 02:25 »
0
more than 100 000 .....  my God... I'm drowning...

« Reply #39 on: January 27, 2010, 02:37 »
0
Oh yeah and I agree keywords at Shutterstock are really bad.
Time and time again I see terrible keyword spamming. Nothing seems to happen.

« Reply #40 on: January 27, 2010, 08:15 »
0
They'll have ten million images on line next month.  That's a nice marketing hook.  Though, I think they would be wise to weed out the oldest non sellers as they move forward.  If an image hasn't sold in four or five years... it probably never will. 

I think we're gonna see a new marketing strategy from them touting the "freshness" of their images and video given the huge delay in review times at iStock, particularly for non-exclusives.

"If you want fresh images today, you're only going to get them here" kind of deal...  I've talked to some marketing people at a couple of footage agencies that are planning to attack iStock with the same type of strategy.

« Reply #41 on: January 27, 2010, 08:25 »
0
I think we're gonna see a new marketing strategy from them touting the "freshness" of their images and video given the huge delay in review times at iStock, particularly for non-exclusives.
"If you want fresh images today, you're only going to get them here" kind of deal...  I've talked to some marketing people at a couple of footage agencies that are planning to attack iStock with the same type of strategy.

Yeah, because 2 days for exclusives, 3-5 for independents really makes images less "fresh" at iStock.


« Reply #42 on: January 27, 2010, 08:38 »
0
Yeah, because 2 days for exclusives, 3-5 for independents really makes images less "fresh" at iStock.

Exactly. Do Dnavarrojr's marketing people consider a stock image to be 'so last week' once it's been on-line more than a few days?

sc

« Reply #43 on: January 27, 2010, 09:15 »
0
Yeah, because 2 days for exclusives, 3-5 for independents really makes images less "fresh" at iStock.

I'd be happy with 3-5 days - it's closer to  7-9 days lately

« Reply #44 on: January 27, 2010, 09:32 »
0
Yeah, because 2 days for exclusives, 3-5 for independents really makes images less "fresh" at iStock.

Exactly. Do Dnavarrojr's marketing people consider a stock image to be 'so last week' once it's been on-line more than a few days?

Ha!

"Isolated apples are 'so last week'.  Studies show bananas are hot right now.  Thank god for SS's fast approvals!"

donding

  • Think before you speak
« Reply #45 on: January 27, 2010, 09:49 »
0
Yeah, because 2 days for exclusives, 3-5 for independents really makes images less "fresh" at iStock.

Exactly. Do Dnavarrojr's marketing people consider a stock image to be 'so last week' once it's been on-line more than a few days?

Ha!

"Isolated apples are 'so last week'.  Studies show bananas are hot right now.  Thank god for SS's fast approvals!"
Now everyone is going to be flooding the market with banana shots!

« Reply #46 on: January 27, 2010, 09:56 »
0
Now everyone is going to be flooding the market with banana shots!

Dude, bananas are so last hour.  Unfortunately, I can't take advantage of the new market study that shows kiwifruits coming in out of nowhere, since my inspections can take a few days.

« Reply #47 on: January 27, 2010, 10:39 »
0
Dude, bananas are so last hour.  Unfortunately, I can't take advantage of the new market study that shows kiwifruits coming in out of nowhere, since my inspections can take a few days.

Latest ticker news from the market ... interest in 'pepperoni pizza' is is strengthening whilst 'business team' has been over-bought and looking shaky.

donding

  • Think before you speak
« Reply #48 on: January 27, 2010, 10:46 »
0
Dude, bananas are so last hour.  Unfortunately, I can't take advantage of the new market study that shows kiwifruits coming in out of nowhere, since my inspections can take a few days.

Latest ticker news from the market ... interest in 'pepperoni pizza' is is strengthening whilst 'business team' has been over-bought and looking shaky.
Any one interested in a Pizza?...I'll split the slices with you in case they lose their interest before we get them posted and eaten.....LOL ::)

« Reply #49 on: January 27, 2010, 16:42 »
0
Sorry, 9 from me, they just approved my application to join. Good news* is, I don't have a further 500 to upload on them.

* not so good news for me
« Last Edit: January 27, 2010, 16:44 by Red Dove »


 

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