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Author Topic: Murdered Shutterstock Forum Refugee Thread  (Read 29226 times)

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S2D2

« Reply #225 on: January 16, 2022, 11:55 »
+1


....
I couldn't care less, or is it I could care less?  ;) (for those who care more about which way someone says it) Merriam-Webster treats the phrases couldn't care less and could care less as synonymous Like when I make toast that has sugar and synonymous sprinkled on it.

flammable vs inflammable
regardless vs Irregardless

As aggravating as it can be, the dictionary doesn't act as  authority to define words, and correct spellings, it only reflects the usage and accepted spellings that are common.

Since some people are extremely limited (I'm trying to be nice?) so definitions change and words acquire lateral, limited or new meanings. Take for example the word NICE?

"From the Anglo-Norman language to classical Latin to English, the word nice used to refer to someone ignorant from the Latin word nescius. Starting from the 1300s up to the 1600s the meaning was the same ignorant, foolish or silly. But during the same period, nice took on different meanings, from being dissolute, wanton, cowardly, effeminate, lazy, intricate, sluggish, refined to elegant.

In the 16th century the meanings changed to sharp, attentive, meticulous. When the 18th century arrived, the meanings lost much of its prestige; it gained the meaning we use today, such as pleasant or agreeable."

Which nice and I trying to be?

'Nice' actually still has two meanings.

The second meaning is 'slight, subtle' as in 'a nice distinction'.

Do languages other than English have as many single words with different meanings, I wonder?


thijsdegraaf

« Reply #226 on: January 16, 2022, 13:32 »
0


....
I couldn't care less, or is it I could care less?  ;) (for those who care more about which way someone says it) Merriam-Webster treats the phrases couldn't care less and could care less as synonymous Like when I make toast that has sugar and synonymous sprinkled on it.

flammable vs inflammable
regardless vs Irregardless

As aggravating as it can be, the dictionary doesn't act as  authority to define words, and correct spellings, it only reflects the usage and accepted spellings that are common.

Since some people are extremely limited (I'm trying to be nice?) so definitions change and words acquire lateral, limited or new meanings. Take for example the word NICE?

"From the Anglo-Norman language to classical Latin to English, the word nice used to refer to someone ignorant from the Latin word nescius. Starting from the 1300s up to the 1600s the meaning was the same ignorant, foolish or silly. But during the same period, nice took on different meanings, from being dissolute, wanton, cowardly, effeminate, lazy, intricate, sluggish, refined to elegant.

In the 16th century the meanings changed to sharp, attentive, meticulous. When the 18th century arrived, the meanings lost much of its prestige; it gained the meaning we use today, such as pleasant or agreeable."

Which nice and I trying to be?

'Nice' actually still has two meanings.

The second meaning is 'slight, subtle' as in 'a nice distinction'.

Do languages other than English have as many single words with different meanings, I wonder?

Dutch:
Two examples with a changed meaning and an example where the meaning of the past is still used in a part of the country.
There are many Dutch words with different meanings.

Dutch: Rakker
Rakker: Mischievous person, someone who allows himself to be bold.
250 years ago, a 'rakker' was like a police officer.

Leuk.
A 'leuk' person: A nice person.
200 years ago: A 'leuk' person = an indifferent, cold person.

Schoon:
Schoon: beautiful, laudable (especially in Belgium (Flanders and Limburg) This meaning already known in 900
Schoon: neat, clean, clean, environmentally friendly (especially in the Netherlands)
« Last Edit: January 23, 2022, 02:51 by thijsdegraaf »

« Reply #227 on: January 16, 2022, 14:43 »
0

« Reply #228 on: January 16, 2022, 14:58 »
0
https://ideas.ted.com/20-words-that-once-meant-something-very-different/

PS. They also make that temporal error, saying that "nice" once meant "silly". It was never the case.  ;)
« Last Edit: January 16, 2022, 15:08 by Zero Talent »

Uncle Pete

  • Great Place by a Great Lake - My Home Port
« Reply #229 on: January 17, 2022, 11:54 »
+1
https://ideas.ted.com/20-words-that-once-meant-something-very-different/

PS. They also make that temporal error, saying that "nice" once meant "silly". It was never the case.  ;)

Well isn't this all Terrific? "The root of terrific is terror, and it first meant terror-inducing." 

Like how errors on the Internet get repeated until they get copied and taken as facts. I was looking for the secret to McDonald's breakfast sauce. (OK too much time on my hands?) And I started to search. One site after another had some strange version, that had odd ingredients, listed exactly the same way and order. I mean, it was a clear miss!

If you ever had the Breakfast Bagel that's where you would find it, unless you special order it on your egg McMuffin like we did. Breakfast bagels are off the menu, there's no more sauce. Dead issue.

Wasn't all that difficult, I looked on the McDonald's site for ingredients and nutrition and found enough to guess what the real combination was. But back then, any search using Google or Bing would bring up the many wrong answer sites, that all used, the same wrong source, because each of them, didn't do research, they just searched and copied.

Yup, the infinite echo chamber of disinformation.

ps it's nothing but a cheap home made version of Hollandaise sauce. Here's mine.

3 parts Mayonnaise, 1 part Dijon Mustard. Plus these Spices: Add to taste - Dill, Salt, Pepper, Buttermilk Powder, Natural Smoke Flavor.
A ThinkStock of Lemon juice, pinch of Turmeric, pinch of Cayenne Pepper if you like that.

Or just buy some Hollandaise sauce. Not Rocket Science.

S2D2

« Reply #230 on: January 22, 2022, 04:32 »
0
Interesting:

'Working with its growing community of over 1.9 million contributors, Shutterstock adds hundreds of thousands of images each week, and currently has more than 390 million images and more than 23 million video clips available'.

https://investor.shutterstock.com/news-releases/news-release-details/shutterstock-report-fourth-quarter-2021-earnings-results

Uncle Pete

  • Great Place by a Great Lake - My Home Port
« Reply #231 on: January 22, 2022, 15:18 »
+3
Interesting:

'Working with its growing community of over 1.9 million contributors, Shutterstock adds hundreds of thousands of images each week, and currently has more than 390 million images and more than 23 million video clips available'.

https://investor.shutterstock.com/news-releases/news-release-details/shutterstock-report-fourth-quarter-2021-earnings-results

Fluff. If they have 1.9 million contributors, I'd want to know, how many have at least one file accepted, how many haven't uploaded anything new in eight years. How many closed their accounts since 2020?

There's a long back and forth discussing how many contributors and based on account numbers, back the first days of January. We'll never know. But my view is, having 1.9 million people sign up is a far cry from how many are active or ever did anything past, creating an account.

To me a contributor is someone who has actually contributed. There are not 1.9 million.

Just a bunch of numbers.  https://www.microstockgroup.com/shutterstock-com/looking-back-at-ss-a-brief-history/

marthamarks

« Reply #232 on: January 22, 2022, 18:23 »
+1
This thread's diversion into the "Isn't it interesting how words change their meanings?" topic has reminded me of several that I've seen that happen to in my increasingly long life.

For example, in 1942, a book named "Our Hearts Were Young and Gay" was published in the US. In 1946 (the year I was born), it was made into a movie. By the time I was in high school and old enough to read such books, the word "gay" had taken on an entirely different meaning.

Or take, as another example, the word "queer." I remember with considerable chagrin the week in January 1960 when my family moved from the suburbs of Washington DC to Texas. I had been an avid reader for years and so had a pretty darn good vocabuary for my age.

On my second day in this new-to-me junior high school, the English teacher read aloud a passage from some book that contained the word "peculiar." She paused, peered out over her glasses, and asked: "Class, does anybody know what 'peculiar' means?" Nobody else in the room raised their hand. But I did know what "peculiar" meant so, very timidly, I raised mine. "It means 'odd' or 'queer'," I said.

The best way I can describe what happened next is this: The already-overweight teacher puffed up like an offended toad, pushed her glasses onto the top of her head, and croaked: "Martha!!!! WE don't use WORDS like THAT around HERE!!!!"

I remember thinking, Words like what? But I kept my mouth shut for another whole week, afraid of making some similar mistake again.

Of course, I was right, because words like "gay" and "queer" had completely different and "straight" meanings even as recently as the first half of the 20th Century.
« Last Edit: January 22, 2022, 21:10 by marthamarks »

marthamarks

« Reply #233 on: January 22, 2022, 18:24 »
0
duplicate

« Reply #234 on: January 22, 2022, 19:34 »
+2
in the 60's we used queer as a synonym for freak (itself an adoption from carny-speak) self-describing someone in the counterculture

other 'recent' changes:

'computers' in the 40s were women who worked as analysts in decoding
'ghetto' was expanded to 'urban ghetto' and shortened back to 'ghetto' but with a different population
'ripoff' originally meant to kill someone (usually a 'pig')
'chauvinism' was a relation among countries, so 'male chauvinism' in the 60's originally played on that (we also coined carbon chauvinism to describe a rejection of considering other lifeforms)
'holocaust' went from a generic meaning to a very specific one

marthamarks

« Reply #235 on: January 22, 2022, 20:30 »
+1
in the 60's we used queer as a synonym for freak (itself an adoption from carny-speak) self-describing someone in the counterculture

other 'recent' changes:

'computers' in the 40s were women who worked as analysts in decoding
'ghetto' was expanded to 'urban ghetto' and shortened back to 'ghetto' but with a different population
'ripoff' originally meant to kill someone (usually a 'pig')
'chauvinism' was a relation among countries, so 'male chauvinism' in the 60's originally played on that (we also coined carbon chauvinism to describe a rejection of considering other lifeforms)
'holocaust' went from a generic meaning to a very specific one

That's all very interesting, Steve. I just learned a few things from you. Thanks!

S2D2

« Reply #236 on: January 22, 2022, 22:05 »
+1
I am reading Agatha Christie novels at present and your words, Martha, come up time and again, in their original context.
 

marthamarks

« Reply #237 on: January 23, 2022, 00:18 »
+1
I am reading Agatha Christie novels at present and your words, Martha, come up time and again, in their original context.

Yes, they would, because Dame Agatha was writing back in the time when "those words" didn't mean what they do today.

« Reply #238 on: January 23, 2022, 13:40 »
0
in the 60's we used queer as a synonym for freak (itself an adoption from carny-speak) self-describing someone in the counterculture

other 'recent' changes:

'computers' in the 40s were women who worked as analysts in decoding
'ghetto' was expanded to 'urban ghetto' and shortened back to 'ghetto' but with a different population
'ripoff' originally meant to kill someone (usually a 'pig')
'chauvinism' was a relation among countries, so 'male chauvinism' in the 60's originally played on that (we also coined carbon chauvinism to describe a rejection of considering other lifeforms)
'holocaust' went from a generic meaning to a very specific one

That's all very interesting, Steve. I just learned a few things from you. Thanks!

the linguist John McWhorter covers these topics, esp'ly words on the move & the language hoax

Uncle Pete

  • Great Place by a Great Lake - My Home Port
« Reply #239 on: January 24, 2022, 13:06 »
0
I had to laugh at Martha's school experience.  ;D

Dope was a stupid person. Later it was Heroin. But in the hippie era, it was marijuana. They dope horses to alter their performance. When I was a kid, Dope was paint for cloth sealing on model kits. And I don't know how long, but the straight dope was inside information. Now Dope is something good... I guess if someone was looking for a word with many confusing and different meaning, that might be one?

But of course we can just blame the Dutch. (In any case where we can't blame Canada, an ethnic group or minority group, how do the Dutch get attributed with these odd definitions so often?)

Dope comes from the Dutch doop, meaning thick sauce and used for various types of gravy in English in the early 1800s.

Well if that isn't the best gravy, it's really dope!  ;)

« Reply #240 on: January 24, 2022, 13:14 »
0
I had to laugh at Martha's school experience.  ;D

Dope was a stupid person. Later it was Heroin. But in the hippie era, it was marijuana. They dope horses to alter their performance. When I was a kid, Dope was paint for cloth sealing on model kits. And I don't know how long, but the straight dope was inside information. Now Dope is something good... I guess if someone was looking for a word with many confusing and different meaning, that might be one?

But of course we can just blame the Dutch. (In any case where we can't blame Canada, an ethnic group or minority group, how do the Dutch get attributed with these odd definitions so often?)

Dope comes from the Dutch doop, meaning thick sauce and used for various types of gravy in English in the early 1800s.

Well if that isn't the best gravy, it's really dope!  ;)

"Disgusting". It actually begins to mean "very good".

"This player is so good, it's disgusting!"  ;)
« Last Edit: January 24, 2022, 13:17 by Zero Talent »

« Reply #241 on: January 24, 2022, 13:54 »
0
'dope' is a contender but there's also 'cool', 'bad' & 'wicked'  -- all part of a natural tendency to create a group specific slang & sometimes the slang leaks out to mainstream

then there's 'awful'


 

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