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Author Topic: New rules for editorials (again)  (Read 9277 times)

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« on: March 30, 2013, 04:07 »
+1
For anyone who is wondering why their editorials are in SS's queue forever, I just got the following e-mail laying down the law for future editorial submissions. I received this two weeks after I complained to support that my photos were in the queue for more than 20 days (more than 35 by now). I sent them what I had from the events in question but haven't heard back from them...

------------
Please follow the instructions below for your future submissions and make sure you follow the new procedures for every event you submit. This is simply an added layer of assurance for us as well as for yourselves that you are allowed to license the content appropriately.

Images submitted for editorial use that have been taken of the following require proof of credentials before they will accepted:
● Sporting events (including those taken at noncollegiate schools or recreational, nonprofessional events)
● Concerts
● Festivals
● Trade shows
● Theatrical performances (including those taken at school performances/theater)
● Conventions
● Openings
● Ticketed events

Credential requirements: Images shot at any event requiring credentials will only be accepted if the submission is accompanied with either of the following documents proving photographer credentials:

I. An event badge (a sticker will not suffice) that indicates your authorization to shoot the event and includes the following information:
1. the name of the event;
2. the date of the event; and
3. your name (if possible)

OR

II. Correspondence (e.g., email chain, letter) with the venue, performers management, or other authorized representative of the event having the authority to grant you credentials to shoot the
event. Such correspondence must include the following information:
1. the name of the event;
2. the date of the event (if not, then the date of the email);
3. your name;
4. the authorized representatives name and company; and
5. the email must be sent from the representatives company email account.
Please note that we will evaluate credentials on a case by case basis.

To submit images with credentials, please email credentials@shutterstock.com.

Send the credentials to credentials@shutterstock.com and then wait for further instructions from us. We will review the credentials, determine if they are appropriate, and then reply asking you to submit your images with a note to the reviewer at Shutterstock. If your images are of a timely nature (i.e.: a big news or sporting event), add a note to the reviewer explaining this to us and send an email after you have successfully uploaded to credentials@shutterstock.com

------------


« Reply #1 on: March 30, 2013, 07:24 »
0
This is worded very broadly, e.g. festivals includes tons of street activity, parades, food stalls, etc. It rules out an awful lot of stuff.

WarrenPrice

« Reply #2 on: March 30, 2013, 09:56 »
0
This is worded very broadly, e.g. festivals includes tons of street activity, parades, food stalls, etc. It rules out an awful lot of stuff.

I've been thinking about uploading my "historical" editorial stuff to Alamy.  Maybe this will finally convince me to get off my butt and make the effort.   :P

SNP

  • Canadian Photographer
« Reply #3 on: March 30, 2013, 14:04 »
0
I knew there was a reason I keep all my media badges. my nieces and nephews love to play with them, but I keep them hanging around. I should probably scan them all in. I also file my accreditation letters just in case.

« Reply #4 on: March 30, 2013, 14:26 »
+1
I knew there was a reason I keep all my media badges. my nieces and nephews love to play with them, but I keep them hanging around. I should probably scan them all in. I also file my accreditation letters just in case.
Good thing you got badges and not stickers - because those will obviously not suffice  ;D

*shakes head in wonderment* (not at you keeping the badges, but at SS's new policy)

« Reply #5 on: March 30, 2013, 17:54 »
0
Badges? We ain't got no badges. We don't need no badges! I don't have to show you any stinkin' badges.

gillian vann

  • *Gillian*
« Reply #6 on: March 30, 2013, 18:10 »
+1
a rule made in one country for the world?
yah. great.

ruxpriencdiam

    This user is banned.
  • Location. Third stone from the sun
« Reply #7 on: March 30, 2013, 19:56 »
0
Here is the loophole!

Quote
Credential requirements: Images shot at any event requiring credentials will only be accepted if the submission is accompanied with either of the following documents proving photographer credentials:

I. An event badge (a sticker will not suffice) that indicates your authorization to shoot the event and includes the following information:
1. the name of the event;
2. the date of the event; and
3. your name (if possible)

You can have badges made or you can make them yourself.

« Reply #8 on: March 31, 2013, 01:27 »
+1
a rule made in one country for the world?
yah. great.

This is not the way the media works in my country either and it flies in the face of some core ethical considerations as to what a journalist is. A journalist, or photo journalist for that matter, is supposed to be just like everyone else. No special considerations. No special badges. No special treatment.

Seem to remember something about that in journalism class 102.

The fact that event organisers don't get that concept because they feel they need to "manage" the media better is understandable. Not so for the agency pretending to represent the photojournalist.

RM from here on in, I suspect.


 

« Reply #9 on: March 31, 2013, 05:37 »
0
But with these rules, for SS is better if they declares we want works from freelancer accredited. Why so many blablabla?

« Reply #10 on: March 31, 2013, 05:53 »
+1
No wonder my editorials haven't been reviewed for a week now, they have been up and running with other agencies already.
Oh well, I guess I don't submit editorials to SS anymore.

« Reply #11 on: March 31, 2013, 07:42 »
+3
Hello,

Just to clarify things...we've had an existing policy of requiring credentials for editorial events like those described above (ticketed events, sporting events, concerts, etc..., that might be held on private property).  We're now asking contributors to send us the credentials prior to the event as a way to speed up the review process. 

Previously, images would be submitted and when there was a question about access or credentials (or if the images were submitted without credentials) --- the images would have been rejected or not approved --- kicking off a back-and-forth email chain with Support.  By sending in the credentials beforehand, you are proactively making sure that your images can get approved in a timely fashion, which makes review go faster for everyone.

Ultimately, the goal is to speed up the review process, as well as protect your ability to license these images while protecting our customer's ability to use them without issues as well.

Ploink - I don't know which account in yours, but if you private message me your Shutterstock username - I can ask the team to look up your account.  As I've mentioned in other threads, the extraordinary review times you're mentioning are almost always circumstances in which there was a problem with a group of images, the images required more information from the contributor, etc...    But I'd like to look into it to make sure you're receiving the best service possible - so please PM me your info.

Best,

Scott
VP of Content
Shutterstock
« Last Edit: March 31, 2013, 07:45 by scottbraut »

WarrenPrice

« Reply #12 on: March 31, 2013, 10:40 »
+1
Hello,

Just to clarify things...we've had an existing policy of requiring credentials for editorial events like those described above (ticketed events, sporting events, concerts, etc..., that might be held on private property).  We're now asking contributors to send us the credentials prior to the event as a way to speed up the review process. 

Previously, images would be submitted and when there was a question about access or credentials (or if the images were submitted without credentials) --- the images would have been rejected or not approved --- kicking off a back-and-forth email chain with Support.  By sending in the credentials beforehand, you are proactively making sure that your images can get approved in a timely fashion, which makes review go faster for everyone.

Ultimately, the goal is to speed up the review process, as well as protect your ability to license these images while protecting our customer's ability to use them without issues as well.

Ploink - I don't know which account in yours, but if you private message me your Shutterstock username - I can ask the team to look up your account.  As I've mentioned in other threads, the extraordinary review times you're mentioning are almost always circumstances in which there was a problem with a group of images, the images required more information from the contributor, etc...    But I'd like to look into it to make sure you're receiving the best service possible - so please PM me your info.

Best,

Scott
VP of Content
Shutterstock

That part is just NOT true, Scott.  ... the highlighted part.
One of my best sellers is an editorial from an event to which I offered NO credentials.  I had credentials but have no proof. 
And, up until recently (the last year, I guess) my racing images have been accepted, without question.,


« Reply #13 on: March 31, 2013, 12:53 »
+1
Hi Warren,

Without commenting on a specific image or images, let me explain a little bit about our policies.  At Shutterstock, the content and legal teams work very closely together to ensure the integrity of the marketplace.  Our policies around editorial use, credentials, model and property releases, trademark and copyright (and other related topics) come from constant communication and assessments by those teams working together.  As an example, you can see our
list of known restrictions as well as a recent blog post about credentials

Our policies come from existing law, legal considerations and also new developments. Since new developments can affect existing images, we also perform audits on the collection - i.e., there are times that  we go back into the collection and change a determination on one or more images, though we try to keep those changes to a minimum.  We also update our policies as necessary.

We're in the process of creating more educational materials right now to simplify these issues and better educate contributors on what's appropriate and why.  We hope to release those soon...please keep an eye on Shutterbuzz, since well also be releasing those in article format as well.


Best,

Scott
VP of Content
Shutterstock
« Last Edit: March 31, 2013, 12:56 by scottbraut »

« Reply #14 on: March 31, 2013, 13:36 »
0
Ploink - I don't know which account in yours, but if you private message me your Shutterstock username - I can ask the team to look up your account.  As I've mentioned in other threads, the extraordinary review times you're mentioning are almost always circumstances in which there was a problem with a group of images, the images required more information from the contributor, etc...    But I'd like to look into it to make sure you're receiving the best service possible - so please PM me your info.
Sent you a PM just now...

ruxpriencdiam

    This user is banned.
  • Location. Third stone from the sun
« Reply #15 on: March 31, 2013, 13:39 »
0
Hi Warren,

Without commenting on a specific image or images, let me explain a little bit about our policies.  At Shutterstock, the content and legal teams work very closely together to ensure the integrity of the marketplace.  Our policies around editorial use, credentials, model and property releases, trademark and copyright (and other related topics) come from constant communication and assessments by those teams working together.  As an example, you can see our list of known restrictions as well as a recent blog post about credentials

Our policies come from existing law, legal considerations and also new developments. Since new developments can affect existing images, we also perform audits on the collection - i.e., there are times that  we go back into the collection and change a determination on one or more images, though we try to keep those changes to a minimum.  We also update our policies as necessary.

We're in the process of creating more educational materials right now to simplify these issues and better educate contributors on what's appropriate and why.  We hope to release those soon...please keep an eye on Shutterbuzz, since well also be releasing those in article format as well.


Best,

Scott
VP of Content
Shutterstock
Here is my dilemma!

So this weekend we have a Parade coming up free to the public on public property for everyone in the county.

Now here comes the kick in the ashe!

It is called the Daffodil Festival!

Whoa there now lets back up the freight train some!

A Parade that is called a Festival?

So how would this get in?

It cant be captioned as a Parade even though it is because it is in all actually the Daffodil Festival not the Daffodil Parade!

It is and has always been done this way because we are considered the daffodil capital of the world so they have an annual parade and main st festival with all kinds of vendors and things as well as the first car show of the season.

Catch 22 here??????

And also the list of known restrictions hasen't been updated in at least 4 years that I know of?

Also how are the Off Set images getting through all the copyrights that are in them such as interiors, books, magazines, paintings, artwork, furniture, models and more?

EDIT TO ADD:

Looks like the image restriction list has been updated?
« Last Edit: March 31, 2013, 13:44 by ruxpriencdiam »

WarrenPrice

« Reply #16 on: March 31, 2013, 14:16 »
0
deleted
« Last Edit: March 31, 2013, 14:45 by WarrenPrice »


gillian vann

  • *Gillian*
« Reply #17 on: March 31, 2013, 19:39 »
+1
Your list of known restrictions would be best put into country categories.



« Reply #18 on: April 02, 2013, 00:35 »
0
As far as the sticker vs badge that reminds me of the one event shutterstock even helped me get into. I never received a badge. They didn't give them out all they gave out was stickers.


Granted I'm sure that would be fine as shutterstock setup the credentials but I'm not sure I will always get a badge.

The second part is there are a few free music fesitvals, and even some sporting events that go on in this area that are open to the public (mainly bike or foot races), no barricades, no tickets, nothing. You just show up walk in and enjoy. How would a situation like this work out? It's all public land, public access. Hell some of these evens like the bike races they are held on public streets DURING normal traffic time and so you have cars on the track with the riders.


« Reply #19 on: April 02, 2013, 01:01 »
0
As far as the sticker vs badge that reminds me of the one event shutterstock even helped me get into. I never received a badge. They didn't give them out all they gave out was stickers.


Granted I'm sure that would be fine as shutterstock setup the credentials but I'm not sure I will always get a badge.

The second part is there are a few free music fesitvals, and even some sporting events that go on in this area that are open to the public (mainly bike or foot races), no barricades, no tickets, nothing. You just show up walk in and enjoy. How would a situation like this work out? It's all public land, public access. Hell some of these evens like the bike races they are held on public streets DURING normal traffic time and so you have cars on the track with the riders.

There all types of public non-ticketed events such as parades, carnivals, fitness runs and walks, religious parades and processions, free concerts, etc. The new rules are too vague and cover too much territory. I guess for those things you may have to "shoot first and ask later" if you can submit without credentials.

« Reply #20 on: April 02, 2013, 11:01 »
0
I reallyhope e new rules do not cover outdoor unticketed events such as food festival, street events and parades!


« Reply #22 on: April 02, 2013, 16:59 »
0


Based on our policy, a free festival or parade in a public area would not require credentials as the event is open to the public and does not take place on private property.



Thank you for clarifying, this is very helpful.

« Reply #23 on: April 03, 2013, 00:18 »
0
Thank you scottbraut

ruxpriencdiam

    This user is banned.
  • Location. Third stone from the sun
« Reply #24 on: April 03, 2013, 06:45 »
0


 

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