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Author Topic: Reference image required.  (Read 2437 times)

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« on: January 14, 2017, 09:49 »
0
Shutterstock has found a new way to annoy contributors.

Asking for a reference image on ALL vectors submitted.

I have no trouble with providing a reference for something derived from a photo, but geometric abstracts?

Apparently they don't see the absurdity of thinking that proves anything.  We're ARTISTS, duh! 



« Reply #1 on: January 14, 2017, 10:51 »
+1
It happened to me too lately, but I really don't think it is for all vectors (after that batch I submitted an other vector and they did not ask for anything).
Perhaps it is just a new reviewer for vectors.

« Reply #2 on: January 14, 2017, 11:22 »
0
Shutterstock has found a new way to annoy contributors.

Asking for a reference image on ALL vectors submitted.

I have no trouble with providing a reference for something derived from a photo, but geometric abstracts?

Apparently they don't see the absurdity of thinking that proves anything.  We're ARTISTS, duh!

As an FYI for anyone reading who isn't familiar with what iStock used to ask for (don't know about current practice as I no longer submit there). If you drew the vector from scratch they wanted a set of screen captures of the work in progress - uploaded as a single JPG. I have no idea if SS will start asking for that, but it's obviously fairly easy to collect that info at the time you're drawing just in case in the future a site gets super paranoid about whether you created what you created.

Shelma1

« Reply #3 on: January 14, 2017, 11:32 »
0
I haven't had this issue, so I'm guessing it's a one reviewer clicking a random button to meet his/her rejection quota. My random rejection button this week is "keywords." Other weeks it's "image size" or "edges" or some other stuff and nonsense.

niktol

« Reply #4 on: January 14, 2017, 11:32 »
0
attach a pencil sketch and be done with it. Or explain in one sentence why you don't have one. They just need something to attach to your file.

« Reply #5 on: January 14, 2017, 14:52 »
+1
Oh, I can do it, even though it means more work for (what is now) less pay.

I just think it's pointless.

Anyone who can create a vector can produce a reference image, even if they didn't create the original image.   

If it was something that would actually protect against theft, it wouldn't bother me so much.  But, if someone copies a design to upload it to Shutterstock, asking for a reference image won't stop them. 

I feel the same way about this as I did when Wells Fargo asked me to show ID to make a deposit.

(iStock quit asking for reference images some time ago, once they figured that out.)

I already stopped uploading my hand drawn illustrations to Shutterstock when they insisted on a separate property release for each drawing.  A property release stating, "this is my artwork, and I am using it with my permission" was no longer enough, I had to attach a thumbnail for each illustration to a new copy of the release.   I was not really interested in creating hundreds and hundreds of those things.



niktol

« Reply #6 on: January 14, 2017, 15:43 »
0
You are overthinking it. They are not asking you to protect anything from everything, just to supply a reference image. Simply find a way to do it with minimal possible effort.
« Last Edit: January 14, 2017, 15:48 by niktol »


 

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