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Author Topic: Seriously?  (Read 4830 times)

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Ed

« on: December 03, 2011, 12:23 »
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I mean come on guys?



How the heck do you type three diamonds!?


« Reply #1 on: December 03, 2011, 12:51 »
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♦♦♦

 ;)

« Reply #2 on: December 03, 2011, 12:55 »
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My favorite was encountering words typed upside down. 

« Reply #3 on: December 03, 2011, 13:16 »
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In case you didn't know, to the right of where you are supposed to type in the words (or diamonds as the case may be), the top most button reloads and gives you 2 more words.

As an aside - the way they check to see if you are allowed to enter the site is that they give you a known word and an unknown word - so if you get the known word right it doesn't much matter what you type for the other one. They send the same unknown word to a number of people and if enough of them type the same thing then they consider that word known and go from there. It would be funny if everyone typed the same word in when you couldn't identify it because the computer would think that was what it said...

Ed

« Reply #4 on: December 03, 2011, 13:49 »
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I did the refresh and got in.  I just don't understand the difficulty behind it - there are other Captcha services that are much simpler.

Thanks Tom for the insight - I didn't know about that!

« Reply #5 on: December 03, 2011, 14:20 »
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The 'captcha' pushes the problem out to the user, forcing him to waste time entering nonsense, and also costs the site money for human verification services.  It works - and unfortunately the result is that better security procedures aren't being implemented, and we're stuck with this idiocy. 

« Reply #6 on: December 03, 2011, 16:55 »
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Once, I had word "Milosevic" in Captcha on SS... What a weird world!

« Reply #7 on: December 03, 2011, 17:50 »
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It isn't for security, it is to keep automatic programs from logging on to gather data on downloads etc. (and I presume clog up the servers). It is a shame they can't come up with a better way of doing this though.

« Reply #8 on: December 03, 2011, 17:59 »
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OH NO! I always fail those!  :(

« Reply #9 on: December 04, 2011, 13:05 »
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I think you don't need to enter these characters, just the words will do; AFAIK, comma's, dots, tildes and other symbols can be ignored.

« Reply #10 on: December 20, 2011, 10:51 »
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« Reply #11 on: December 25, 2011, 22:15 »
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Scanned books that whose words are actually searchable are thanks to this type of captcha.  It's like tom said, but once enough people type in the same thing for the 'unknown' word (your diamonds), that unknown word is then catalogued in the book as whatever it is.  I am more than happy to deal with complicated captchas to help provide this service.

antistock

« Reply #12 on: December 25, 2011, 23:20 »
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the whole concept of Captcha is basically broken, and annoying too !

wut

« Reply #13 on: December 26, 2011, 05:16 »
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I haven't seen one of these in months. But I also only log in from home lately.

« Reply #14 on: December 27, 2011, 21:33 »
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Here is the guy who invented the CAPTCHA: newbielink:http://www.ted.com/talks/luis_von_ahn_massive_scale_online_collaboration.html [nonactive]

« Reply #15 on: December 28, 2011, 07:10 »
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Great presentation.

lisafx

« Reply #16 on: December 28, 2011, 12:17 »
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LOL!  This is the worst one I have seen yet. 


« Reply #17 on: December 28, 2011, 13:46 »
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And now I don't feel so bad about "Captcha"....can't wait for "duolingo" to go live. Thanks!

RacePhoto

« Reply #18 on: December 29, 2011, 15:12 »
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I haven't seen one of these in months. But I also only log in from home lately.


Every Day but why aren't people posting the ones I get. Tough things like these?



I know, then we'd have nothing to write about.

« Reply #19 on: December 29, 2011, 15:40 »
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Fascinating, thanks for the link!

fred

rubyroo

« Reply #20 on: December 30, 2011, 05:51 »
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And now I don't feel so bad about "Captcha"....can't wait for "duolingo" to go live. Thanks!


Ditto.  I thought that presentation was absolutely brilliant and forwarded it to many people.  Very impressed.  With endeavours like that plus the Internet Archive, and (hopefully) the advent of extremely cheap computers the future could be a wonderful place for ALL to grow up and learn in.

I'm hopeful that this very cheap computer will evolve and ultimately lead to an information revolution for the poorest people.  Just imagine all these strands coming together and providing the most disadvantaged people in the world with access to the greatest books online in their own language.  Wonderful.  Happy new year  :)

http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/thereporters/rorycellanjones/2011/05/a_15_computer_to_inspire_young.html

Ooh I've come over all... Utopian.
« Last Edit: December 30, 2011, 06:36 by rubyroo »

RacePhoto

« Reply #21 on: December 30, 2011, 12:53 »
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And now I don't feel so bad about "Captcha"....can't wait for "duolingo" to go live. Thanks!


Ditto.  I thought that presentation was absolutely brilliant and forwarded it to many people.  Very impressed.  With endeavours like that plus the Internet Archive, and (hopefully) the advent of extremely cheap computers the future could be a wonderful place for ALL to grow up and learn in.

I'm hopeful that this very cheap computer will evolve and ultimately lead to an information revolution for the poorest people.  Just imagine all these strands coming together and providing the most disadvantaged people in the world with access to the greatest books online in their own language.  Wonderful.  Happy new year  :)

http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/thereporters/rorycellanjones/2011/05/a_15_computer_to_inspire_young.html

Ooh I've come over all... Utopian.


Just in case you missed it over the years:  Mary Lou Jepsen didn't set out to invent the netbook and turn the computer industry upside down. She was just trying to create a supercheap laptop. In 2005, Jepsen, a pioneering LCD screen designer, was tapped to lead the development of the machine that would become known as One Laptop per Child. Nicholas Negroponte, the longtime MIT Media Lab visionary, launched the project hoping to create an inexpensive computer for children in developing countries. It would have Wi-Fi, a color screen, and a full keyboardand sell for about $100. At that price, third-world governments could buy millions and hand them out freely in rural villages. Plus, it had to be small, incredibly rugged, and able to run on minimal power. "Half of the world's children have no regular access to electricity," Jepsen points out.

http://one.laptop.org/

I've always thought this was a pretty great way to spread education and information. Heck I want one just to see how they work! (built in webcam, mic, antennae in the rim for better reception, long life battery, solar powered? This IS Cool!) I always thought that they could have a program, buy one and one gets donated, or a percentage of the extra cost in the price would go to fund charity computers. So OK I pay $150 and $50 of that goes to half a computer for someone in a developing country or rural school. Everyone wins?
« Last Edit: December 30, 2011, 13:51 by RacePhoto »

rubyroo

« Reply #22 on: December 30, 2011, 13:44 »
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Gosh, I'd forgotten about that project, Race.  I did hear about it way back when, but too much other info and life-stuff came my way in the years since and it completely slipped my mind.

Thanks for the reminder of that outstanding project, and for the link.  It's so good to see what's being achieved.

Win/win, yes indeed.  That's what I loved so much about the TED presentation too.  I wish our governments would employ such advanced thinkers.  ;)


 

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