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Author Topic: SS new world record: review time 15 ( fifteen) SECONDS  (Read 10282 times)

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Rinderart

« Reply #50 on: September 24, 2016, 20:03 »
0
so.....I guess we can assume that editorial is not a BOT review. I submitted 3 Images 4 Hours ago. Zip.


« Reply #51 on: September 25, 2016, 00:26 »
+5
The trials of a submitted image to Shutterstock in September 2016:

Attempt 1: Rejected for not having a property release. No property release needed for this shot. Re-submit.

Attempt 2: Rejected for focus and poor lighting, as well as potentially infringing on "intellectual property" this time. Nonsense. Re-submit.

Attempt 3: Rejected for not having a property release, again. Now it's a just a dumb game. Do I write a note to reviewer in the description and edit it out later? Who knows what they want anymore. I re-phrase the description in an attempt to alleviate this incorrect property release concern for their robot reviewer. Re-submit.

Attempt 4: Rejected for focus, composition and overuse of effects. Gettin' pretty silly now. Re-submit.

Attempt 5: Rejected for poor lighting. That old chestnut again? Re-submit.

Attempt 6: Approved.

All the same image, never re-edited. This whole process occurring in about 20 minutes. I was really just curious what would happen.

And yes, I really should be doing something better with my Saturday night.

« Reply #52 on: September 25, 2016, 11:01 »
+1
The trials of a submitted image to Shutterstock in September 2016:

Attempt 1: Rejected for not having a property release. No property release needed for this shot. Re-submit.

Attempt 2: Rejected for focus and poor lighting, as well as potentially infringing on "intellectual property" this time. Nonsense. Re-submit.

Attempt 3: Rejected for not having a property release, again. Now it's a just a dumb game. Do I write a note to reviewer in the description and edit it out later? Who knows what they want anymore. I re-phrase the description in an attempt to alleviate this incorrect property release concern for their robot reviewer. Re-submit.

Attempt 4: Rejected for focus, composition and overuse of effects. Gettin' pretty silly now. Re-submit.

Attempt 5: Rejected for poor lighting. That old chestnut again? Re-submit.

Attempt 6: Approved.

All the same image, never re-edited. This whole process occurring in about 20 minutes. I was really just curious what would happen.

And yes, I really should be doing something better with my Saturday night.

HILARIOUS

The only thing that could be funnier would be listening to some SS 'manager' trying to explain this sequence of events, while never actually disclosing what's really going on.  If he even knew.


Rinderart

« Reply #53 on: September 25, 2016, 12:40 »
+2
Amazing Post. Thanks so Much. In my 11 Years at SS I've read I think everything, Posted 50,000 Times and personally Knew all the forum Moderators going back to when Jon was reviewing Himself.

last year  when they seemed to have discontinued them as a separate Identity and Posted a new Cast of 13 administrators and One Moderator and there contact info. Bottom of forum Page.

In all My time I've only Met Or talked to One person At SS that submitted product themselves other than Jon in the beginning.. Maybe things would be better as far as communication if there were more "Inside" folks that shared what we do and would "GET" what we Talk about.

There was One and she was the first. I won't say her name but we had some amazing conversations back in the day. she was "One of Us" and she personally looked at every Image if you wrote with a complaint about a review and could override anyone which she did  [ Now, If a reviewer give you reference# to resubmit, It also says this does not guarantee acceptance}. and If not she would explain why. It seems No One now can Override a review...She left and Ran a site for years.

I know It's way to Big for that now But...It sure was cool and so was she. She was on OUR side and a very good Pinup Photographer. There were also some very cool and very good Mods along the way.

5 or 6 years ago I did a 2 Hour SS Skype thing with 6 people sitting around a table. Not Once did anyone of them look at the screen or me for 2 hours. They asked what I thought were the biggest Problems with SS. I said Communication was #1 and a raise was #2. My pardner dave had the exact same experience and question and answer.

Cut to today......? same exact problem. they simply do NOT talk to us as adults or even Kids and I think there told Not to or get terminated. I've also Known every VP of content, asked them the same question and never got a answer.We'll a few that left....LOL

Thats a shame and the biggest shame...And yes, I understand there is proprietary inside Info and all But C-mon....Really? Were not after government secrets for gods sake.

Oh well. I gave up, Just upload and repeat and try to help other sites that seem to care and there are a few that Listen. My ongoing dream is Jon Takes His Billions and Buys the company Back makes it 50/50 split on all products and dumps 30 Million redundant Images.Because I do think He's a Brilliant man. We had some great talks when this started. I secured the domain ShutterstockMusic for Him. Held on to it for years and gave it to him. Without Not even a thanks BTW.

I've always said If any Company that can't make a profit from 50% of the take especially One that Doesn't make or produce anything ...Well Thats not to Impressive in my book. There is Not One artist on the Planet in any artform that gives away More than 50%.

And. I remember calling Him on His cell the day he was at the NYSE and ready to ring the bell. He said. "Were Very Excited"

the post above by Daryl is Funny and tragic at the same time of what it's come to. sad thing is...... I don't think they Know it or care.

If it were my Company, That would be fixed first thing. Next would be a Person in charge of Public Infomation. and If ya wanna build a BOT? make one that spots redundant Images,keywords,titles,spam and dumps them and puts those submitters On  notice.  ASAP!!!!!!!!

Can SS do the right thing and make even More Money and company Value?? and in doing so Help us??? I think Yes, I hope yes.

And....I kinda wish they would stop the silly Blog things they do. real amateur or maybe....Hmmmmm thats who there after.  Hmmmmmmmmmm again.

« Last Edit: September 25, 2016, 12:43 by Rinderart »

« Reply #54 on: September 25, 2016, 14:51 »
+2
The trials of a submitted image to Shutterstock in September 2016:

Attempt 1: Rejected for not having a property release. No property release needed for this shot. Re-submit.

Attempt 2: Rejected for focus and poor lighting, as well as potentially infringing on "intellectual property" this time. Nonsense. Re-submit.

Attempt 3: Rejected for not having a property release, again. Now it's a just a dumb game. Do I write a note to reviewer in the description and edit it out later? Who knows what they want anymore. I re-phrase the description in an attempt to alleviate this incorrect property release concern for their robot reviewer. Re-submit.

Attempt 4: Rejected for focus, composition and overuse of effects. Gettin' pretty silly now. Re-submit.

Attempt 5: Rejected for poor lighting. That old chestnut again? Re-submit.

Attempt 6: Approved.

All the same image, never re-edited. This whole process occurring in about 20 minutes. I was really just curious what would happen.

And yes, I really should be doing something better with my Saturday night.

They used to threaten to suspend accounts for uploading previously rejected material.  Is that rule gone or are you clicking the previously submitted material notification? 

« Reply #55 on: September 25, 2016, 15:00 »
0
The rule has gone I believe.

Rinderart

« Reply #56 on: September 25, 2016, 22:22 »
+1
The trials of a submitted image to Shutterstock in September 2016:

Attempt 1: Rejected for not having a property release. No property release needed for this shot. Re-submit.

Attempt 2: Rejected for focus and poor lighting, as well as potentially infringing on "intellectual property" this time. Nonsense. Re-submit.

Attempt 3: Rejected for not having a property release, again. Now it's a just a dumb game. Do I write a note to reviewer in the description and edit it out later? Who knows what they want anymore. I re-phrase the description in an attempt to alleviate this incorrect property release concern for their robot reviewer. Re-submit.

Attempt 4: Rejected for focus, composition and overuse of effects. Gettin' pretty silly now. Re-submit.

Attempt 5: Rejected for poor lighting. That old chestnut again? Re-submit.

Attempt 6: Approved.

All the same image, never re-edited. This whole process occurring in about 20 minutes. I was really just curious what would happen.

And yes, I really should be doing something better with my Saturday night.

They used to threaten to suspend accounts for uploading previously rejected material.  Is that rule gone or are you clicking the previously submitted material notification?
That was a threat..Not a rule. do you have any Idea how many times all the so called rules are broken every single day?? A whole bunch.

« Reply #57 on: September 26, 2016, 02:13 »
0
The trials of a submitted image to Shutterstock in September 2016:

Attempt 1: Rejected for not having a property release. No property release needed for this shot. Re-submit.

Attempt 2: Rejected for focus and poor lighting, as well as potentially infringing on "intellectual property" this time. Nonsense. Re-submit.

Attempt 3: Rejected for not having a property release, again. Now it's a just a dumb game. Do I write a note to reviewer in the description and edit it out later? Who knows what they want anymore. I re-phrase the description in an attempt to alleviate this incorrect property release concern for their robot reviewer. Re-submit.

Attempt 4: Rejected for focus, composition and overuse of effects. Gettin' pretty silly now. Re-submit.

Attempt 5: Rejected for poor lighting. That old chestnut again? Re-submit.

Attempt 6: Approved.

All the same image, never re-edited. This whole process occurring in about 20 minutes. I was really just curious what would happen.

And yes, I really should be doing something better with my Saturday night.

Boiled down:

- costs for SS are declining because no need for reviewers any more
- time for contribs increasing for multiple submitting because of nonsense reduction criteria
- revenue for contribs declining

 :)  :o  8)  ???

Rinderart

« Reply #58 on: September 26, 2016, 23:40 »
+1
OK, Because I had some time. One of My models Lives close. I asked Him to come over and sign a new release. A brand new version release with Much More info than the old one. Mind you all other 8 sites accepted the Old one. OK. He came over. and all done. Theres only 7 Images. BTW a GOOD 7 Images. I uploaded 7 with the new release and sure enough all were rejected in 30 seconds.
Model Release--A complete & accurate Shutterstock approved model and/or property release is required.

OK. I need a strong drink Not only do we get Crap payments that are dwindling But to deal with this crap?? writing the stupid Letter for a  re sub. Then the Other Model which the same thing happened last week with 19 Images for same reason. and...It s a model I have over 200 Good Photos of  which the same release was used.

I today located her in Chicago. I asked her to sign a new release. She agreed. I sent her a form to sign and send back. I ask you My colleagues should I upload again all 19 and use this new release or just let go of 19 Very good Useful Images??? What has happened ??, in 11 years 6300 + or- Model released Images that all of a sudden don't work ??...even new versions.??

Asking for advice here. I totally Blew it. and sent a letter to Jon and to Paul and to a admin guy who is a friend. Last time this happened. I got a case Number. It made No difference at all. Who . has final say. Some goofball Incompetent reviewer?? Or a admin.


Bottom Line is 35 Images in the scale of things means not much  But , what is seriously going On.?? Very concerned for all.

I specifically asked the top guys when . are they gonna post guidelines or for that matter anything to help us cope with the crap On this site. Darn It.
« Last Edit: September 26, 2016, 23:44 by Rinderart »

« Reply #59 on: September 27, 2016, 03:25 »
0
Lately is a bit frustrating. Last days i was sended landscapes focused to infinite in daylight and rejected for focus. Another building photos rejected for poor light when they were taken at 12:00 in a sunny day I dont understand anything


Enviado desde mi iPhone utilizando Tapatalk

« Reply #60 on: September 27, 2016, 03:56 »
0
Lately is a bit frustrating. Last days i was sended landscapes focused to infinite in daylight and rejected for focus. Another building photos rejected for poor light when they were taken at 12:00 in a sunny day I dont understand anything


Enviado desde mi iPhone utilizando Tapatalk
After a period where they were seeming to accept almost anything they seem to be rejecting almost everything...someones turned one of the buttons up on the robot. Putting my project to upload old rejected stuff on hold for a week. TBH some of its pretty good some I wouldn't bother with now but its all keyworded etc so up it goes ;-)

« Reply #61 on: September 27, 2016, 05:52 »
+4
Another building photos rejected for poor light when they were taken at 12:00 in a sunny day I dont understand anything

That may be the reason!  8)

« Reply #62 on: September 27, 2016, 08:12 »
+2
I can't imagine nastier photos then those, shoot at 12:00 with sun in full-shining.

« Reply #63 on: September 27, 2016, 09:50 »
0
How would a bot pick up info such as:

Logos/trademarks/artwork
People without model releases


If there is a bot, maybe it screens through simple images without complex matters, to pick up technical errors only. And the images then get accepted, and the rest go through to actual humans

« Reply #64 on: September 27, 2016, 13:11 »
0
How would a bot pick up info such as:

Logos/trademarks/artwork
People without model releases


If there is a bot, maybe it screens through simple images without complex matters, to pick up technical errors only. And the images then get accepted, and the rest go through to actual humans


google ai knows it and the code is open source :


http://petapixel.com/2016/09/23/googles-image-captioning-ai-can-describe-photos-94-accuracy/


« Reply #65 on: September 27, 2016, 14:22 »
+3
There's a lot of conjecture on this forum string about bots being used by the Big 4 sites. These "bots" are a myth. The only automation I know of, for iStock, Fotolia, and Shutterstock at least, is file size rejection or unacceptable file type. There is no automation for image content / design, meaning images won't be rejected upon submission by a computer algorithm - they're being rejected because your image isn't on par with submission guidelines, technical aspects, Model or Property releases, etc., and those are decided by a living, breathing human being, the vast majority of which are highly qualified. I've previously worked for 2 major stock houses, now defunct (thanks a lot Visual China Group / Getty!), and you needed a BFA in photography or visual arts to be an Image Researcher / Editor. iStock was the same. Most people had more than that. I suspect qualifications have lessened over the years, as the stock model has gone from a mostly Rights Managed environment to the Royalty Free microstock model we see today, but to assume reviewers are wholly unqualified is quite a leap.

As for the fast turnaround, after working 10+ years in the industry as an Image Researcher and Image Editor / Reviewer, some of you know that photo output slows down somewhat during the months of June to August. One could account for fast review times = less images for those non-bot reviewers to review, and therefore things move speedily along. I wouldn't continue to expect near instantaneous reviews in the coming months. That'd be great, but then the bot-myth would continue to perpetuate.

« Reply #66 on: September 27, 2016, 14:51 »
+2
There's a lot of conjecture on this forum string about bots being used by the Big 4 sites. These "bots" are a myth. The only automation I know of, for iStock, Fotolia, and Shutterstock at least, is file size rejection or unacceptable file type. There is no automation for image content / design, meaning images won't be rejected upon submission by a computer algorithm - they're being rejected because your image isn't on par with submission guidelines, technical aspects, Model or Property releases, etc., and those are decided by a living, breathing human being, the vast majority of which are highly qualified. I've previously worked for 2 major stock houses, now defunct (thanks a lot Visual China Group / Getty!), and you needed a BFA in photography or visual arts to be an Image Researcher / Editor. iStock was the same. Most people had more than that. I suspect qualifications have lessened over the years, as the stock model has gone from a mostly Rights Managed environment to the Royalty Free microstock model we see today, but to assume reviewers are wholly unqualified is quite a leap.

As for the fast turnaround, after working 10+ years in the industry as an Image Researcher and Image Editor / Reviewer, some of you know that photo output slows down somewhat during the months of June to August. One could account for fast review times = less images for those non-bot reviewers to review, and therefore things move speedily along. I wouldn't continue to expect near instantaneous reviews in the coming months. That'd be great, but then the bot-myth would continue to perpetuate.

Are you aware that SS touts automated inspection software in their SEC Filing?


« Reply #67 on: September 27, 2016, 15:03 »
+1
There's a lot of conjecture on this forum string about bots being used by the Big 4 sites. These "bots" are a myth. The only automation I know of, for iStock, Fotolia, and Shutterstock at least, is file size rejection or unacceptable file type. There is no automation for image content / design, meaning images won't be rejected upon submission by a computer algorithm - they're being rejected because your image isn't on par with submission guidelines, technical aspects, Model or Property releases, etc., and those are decided by a living, breathing human being, the vast majority of which are highly qualified. I've previously worked for 2 major stock houses, now defunct (thanks a lot Visual China Group / Getty!), and you needed a BFA in photography or visual arts to be an Image Researcher / Editor. iStock was the same. Most people had more than that. I suspect qualifications have lessened over the years, as the stock model has gone from a mostly Rights Managed environment to the Royalty Free microstock model we see today, but to assume reviewers are wholly unqualified is quite a leap.

As for the fast turnaround, after working 10+ years in the industry as an Image Researcher and Image Editor / Reviewer, some of you know that photo output slows down somewhat during the months of June to August. One could account for fast review times = less images for those non-bot reviewers to review, and therefore things move speedily along. I wouldn't continue to expect near instantaneous reviews in the coming months. That'd be great, but then the bot-myth would continue to perpetuate.

Are you aware that SS touts automated inspection software in their SEC Filing?

You mean, "Each of our images has been vetted by a member of our review team for standards of quality and relevance. We also leverage proprietary review technology to pre-filter images and enhance the productivity of our reviewers." Form: 424B

To assume that that means that a computer is vetting an image for anything other than the file size or unacceptable image file type as I previously mentioned, is again, conjecture.

« Reply #68 on: September 27, 2016, 15:16 »
+1
There's a lot of conjecture on this forum string about bots being used by the Big 4 sites. These "bots" are a myth. The only automation I know of, for iStock, Fotolia, and Shutterstock at least, is file size rejection or unacceptable file type. There is no automation for image content / design, meaning images won't be rejected upon submission by a computer algorithm - they're being rejected because your image isn't on par with submission guidelines, technical aspects, Model or Property releases, etc., and those are decided by a living, breathing human being, the vast majority of which are highly qualified. I've previously worked for 2 major stock houses, now defunct (thanks a lot Visual China Group / Getty!), and you needed a BFA in photography or visual arts to be an Image Researcher / Editor. iStock was the same. Most people had more than that. I suspect qualifications have lessened over the years, as the stock model has gone from a mostly Rights Managed environment to the Royalty Free microstock model we see today, but to assume reviewers are wholly unqualified is quite a leap.

As for the fast turnaround, after working 10+ years in the industry as an Image Researcher and Image Editor / Reviewer, some of you know that photo output slows down somewhat during the months of June to August. One could account for fast review times = less images for those non-bot reviewers to review, and therefore things move speedily along. I wouldn't continue to expect near instantaneous reviews in the coming months. That'd be great, but then the bot-myth would continue to perpetuate.

Are you aware that SS touts automated inspection software in their SEC Filing?

You mean, "Each of our images has been vetted by a member of our review team for standards of quality and relevance. We also leverage proprietary review technology to pre-filter images and enhance the productivity of our reviewers." Form: 424B

To assume that that means that a computer is vetting an image for anything other than the file size or unacceptable image file type as I previously mentioned, is again, conjecture.

So your hypothesis is that aside from image size or type all of sudden many contributors, some very well established pros, started sending in wrong model releases, blurry images, property released images with no property release, bad color balances, wrong or missing model releases, that somehow SS found superhuman reviewers to check key image properties in 30 seconds all the while letting in thousands of duplicate pot images that somehow magically passed their non bot inspection process?
« Last Edit: September 27, 2016, 15:21 by Mantis »

« Reply #69 on: September 27, 2016, 15:27 »
0
There's a lot of conjecture on this forum string about bots being used by the Big 4 sites. These "bots" are a myth. The only automation I know of, for iStock, Fotolia, and Shutterstock at least, is file size rejection or unacceptable file type. There is no automation for image content / design, meaning images won't be rejected upon submission by a computer algorithm - they're being rejected because your image isn't on par with submission guidelines, technical aspects, Model or Property releases, etc., and those are decided by a living, breathing human being, the vast majority of which are highly qualified. I've previously worked for 2 major stock houses, now defunct (thanks a lot Visual China Group / Getty!), and you needed a BFA in photography or visual arts to be an Image Researcher / Editor. iStock was the same. Most people had more than that. I suspect qualifications have lessened over the years, as the stock model has gone from a mostly Rights Managed environment to the Royalty Free microstock model we see today, but to assume reviewers are wholly unqualified is quite a leap.

As for the fast turnaround, after working 10+ years in the industry as an Image Researcher and Image Editor / Reviewer, some of you know that photo output slows down somewhat during the months of June to August. One could account for fast review times = less images for those non-bot reviewers to review, and therefore things move speedily along. I wouldn't continue to expect near instantaneous reviews in the coming months. That'd be great, but then the bot-myth would continue to perpetuate.

Are you aware that SS touts automated inspection software in their SEC Filing?

You mean, "Each of our images has been vetted by a member of our review team for standards of quality and relevance. We also leverage proprietary review technology to pre-filter images and enhance the productivity of our reviewers." Form: 424B

To assume that that means that a computer is vetting an image for anything other than the file size or unacceptable image file type as I previously mentioned, is again, conjecture.

So your hypothesis is that aside from image size or type all of sudden many contributors started sending in wrong model releases, blurry images, property released images with no property release, bad color balances, wrong or missing model releases, that somehow SS found superhuman reviewers to check key image properties in 30 seconds all the while letting in thousands of duplicate pot images that somehow magically passed their non bot inspection process? You are obviously trolling, which we get in here now and then.

I'm just stating facts as I know them. People are fallable. Stock images going through the submission process are never reviewed by the same person twice, and some images will have multiple issues that maybe a previous reviewer didn't pick up on, or another reviewer is feeling lenient for an image that teeters on what would be acceptable or unacceptable for a stock site's collection.

Rinderart

« Reply #70 on: September 27, 2016, 16:28 »
+1
OK....Last word on this. I wrote a very Long Letter to SS staff member .ANSWER.....#1.. THERE is NO BOT.  The new Model release I submitted had a flaw. a silly Flaw but My fault. and Will be corrected and sent. I asked My contact why there is..still after 5 Years No real communication . Lots of unanswered questions on their forum. No real answer to That But....There is No Bot in Place. they have hired a ton more reviewers. Thats it.Hmmmmmmm really?.Personally Im done with this subject and trying to find a satisfying solution. There really is none.And They are simply Not going to talk.if I can't believe a Friend whos been there a long Time..Oh well. on to something else.

« Reply #71 on: September 27, 2016, 16:39 »
0
of course there is no bot, bots cant check for trademark infringment, but they do use automated processes to prescreen images for other issues. its not rocket science, as soon as the image is not deemed in focus, its rejected, and then we moan to cs, and then a person will tell you to resubmit,

« Reply #72 on: September 27, 2016, 19:32 »
+1
I can't imagine nastier photos then those, shoot at 12:00 with sun in full-shining.

Dear, for architecture sun rule is different than with people. More light is better. Take a look into search engine with word "buildings" and you see where is the sun in most pics.


Enviado desde mi iPhone utilizando Tapatalk

« Reply #73 on: September 27, 2016, 23:05 »
0
of course there is no bot, bots cant check for trademark infringment, but they do use automated processes to prescreen images for other issues. its not rocket science, as soon as the image is not deemed in focus, its rejected, and then we moan to cs, and then a person will tell you to resubmit,

What about those blurry backgrounds, how do bots know, what they are and not reject them for focus?

Rinderart

« Reply #74 on: September 27, 2016, 23:51 »
0
Gomma trade in My Tin foil Hat for a Sombrero. LOL.


 

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