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Author Topic: Video reject reason - frame rate  (Read 2217 times)

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« on: December 29, 2018, 22:26 »
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I've had several videos rejected for "Frame Rate / Shutter Speed: Clip exhibits issues related to frame rate or shutter speed." anyone knows what does it mean? They have been accepted everywhere but shutterstock. Funny I resubmit and they accept them and other times don't. I use the same equipment and the same software to process so why some get accepted and others don't? Thanks


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« Reply #1 on: December 30, 2018, 01:31 »
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What frame rate are you shooting in and what settings are you exporting in?

« Reply #2 on: December 30, 2018, 07:39 »
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What frame rate are you shooting in and what settings are you exporting in?
30 and 29.97, could that be the problem? My software recognizes that 29.97 is the best export fps. Should I set that in 30 anyway?

wds

« Reply #3 on: December 31, 2018, 09:26 »
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What frame rate are you shooting in and what settings are you exporting in?
30 and 29.97, could that be the problem? My software recognizes that 29.97 is the best export fps. Should I set that in 30 anyway?

I believe 30 or 29.97 should be acceptable. Is it possible there is some kind of "hiccup" in the file (for example, cell phones will vary the frame rate on the fly)? What type of camera are you using?

« Reply #4 on: December 31, 2018, 09:31 »
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What frame rate are you shooting in and what settings are you exporting in?
30 and 29.97, could that be the problem? My software recognizes that 29.97 is the best export fps. Should I set that in 30 anyway?

I believe 30 or 29.97 should be acceptable. Is it possible there is some kind of "hiccup" in the file (for example, cell phones will vary the frame rate on the fly)? What type of camera are you using?
I'm not an expert in this. I use Huawei Mate 10, supossedly it records at 4K (30 fps). Is it possible it changes fps during the recording? is there a software to shows that? I didn't know about it. Is it possible that is just shutterstock being shutterstock? They got accepted in AS and P5 without problem.

« Reply #5 on: December 31, 2018, 09:50 »
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Did you change the shutter speed manually? They don't like it as it might make the footage look a bit choppy or introduce flickering. With 30 fps, shooting shutter speed should be at (or a multiple of) 1/60. They can see that in the metadata, so it might be the rejection reason.

« Reply #6 on: December 31, 2018, 11:01 »
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Did you change the shutter speed manually? They don't like it as it might make the footage look a bit choppy or introduce flickering. With 30 fps, shooting shutter speed should be at (or a multiple of) 1/60. They can see that in the metadata, so it might be the rejection reason.
It seems like I can set that. Maybe that's the problem... Is it possible to use a software to change that or something? Does it really matter? They don't "seem" with those type of issues

« Reply #7 on: December 31, 2018, 11:15 »
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Did you change the shutter speed manually? They don't like it as it might make the footage look a bit choppy or introduce flickering. With 30 fps, shooting shutter speed should be at (or a multiple of) 1/60. They can see that in the metadata, so it might be the rejection reason.
It seems like I can set that. Maybe that's the problem... Is it possible to use a software to change that or something? Does it really matter? They don't "seem" with those type of issues

No, that doesn't really matter in most cases. There are about a million GoPro clips on there and 99% of them have the wrong shutter speed. And probably about 70-90% of all drone clips too.  ;)

Without having seen your clip, I would guess this is likely just one of those automatic rejections that aren't really based on anything real.

Of course, there CAN be real shutter speed issues - for example, if you drop a 24p clip on a 30p timeline in some applications they will add 6 duplicate frames each second, which can give a stuttering effect if there is enough motion. This doesn't seem to be the case here though.

As others pointed out, phones sometimes record in variable or odd frame rates, like 30.1p or 27p. An app like VLC (free) will tell you all the details.

I suppose the only way for us to give a real answer would be for you to post the actual clip (or small part of it) somewhere.
« Last Edit: December 31, 2018, 11:19 by increasingdifficulty »

« Reply #8 on: December 31, 2018, 11:22 »
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Did you change the shutter speed manually? They don't like it as it might make the footage look a bit choppy or introduce flickering. With 30 fps, shooting shutter speed should be at (or a multiple of) 1/60. They can see that in the metadata, so it might be the rejection reason.
It seems like I can set that. Maybe that's the problem... Is it possible to use a software to change that or something? Does it really matter? They don't "seem" with those type of issues

No, that doesn't really matter in most cases. There are about a million GoPro clips on there and 99% of them have the wrong shutter speed. And probably about 70-90% of all drone clips too.  ;)

Without having seen your clip, I would guess this is likely just one of those automatic rejections that aren't really based on anything real.

Of course, there CAN be real shutter speed issues - for example, if you drop a 24p clip on a 30p timeline in some applications they will add 6 duplicate frames each second, which can give a stuttering effect if there is enough motion. This doesn't seem to be the case here though.

As others pointed out, phones sometimes record in variable or odd frame rates, like 30.1p or 27p. An app like VLC (free) will tell you all the details.

I suppose the only way for us to give a real answer would be for you to post the actual clip (or small part of it) somewhere.
After holidays I will post a random video from my phone with the same settings and after the process I do with my software. Thanks a lot guys

« Reply #9 on: January 01, 2019, 10:03 »
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I had this problem suddenly come up at 29.97 frame rates. I started submitting at 30 fps and never had another problem. I think it may be how their programs are reading the metadata and perhaps rounding off.

« Reply #10 on: January 01, 2019, 15:03 »
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I had this kind of rejections once or twice, but never tried too hard to figure them out.

Most of my clips are at 30 or 29.97, which have always been accepted.

« Reply #11 on: January 02, 2019, 11:16 »
+1
I had this problem suddenly come up at 29.97 frame rates. I started submitting at 30 fps and never had another problem. I think it may be how their programs are reading the metadata and perhaps rounding off.
I'm going to export in 30 fps even if the software suggest 29.97, to see if SS stop making problems

« Reply #12 on: January 02, 2019, 20:57 »
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I had this problem suddenly come up at 29.97 frame rates. I started submitting at 30 fps and never had another problem. I think it may be how their programs are reading the metadata and perhaps rounding off.
I'm going to export in 30 fps even if the software suggest 29.97, to see if SS stop making problems
It's highly recommended to export in the same frame rate as you shot it. There is no zero reason to nudge frame rates on export.

« Reply #13 on: January 02, 2019, 21:13 »
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I had this problem suddenly come up at 29.97 frame rates. I started submitting at 30 fps and never had another problem. I think it may be how their programs are reading the metadata and perhaps rounding off.
I'm going to export in 30 fps even if the software suggest 29.97, to see if SS stop making problems
It's highly recommended to export in the same frame rate as you shot it. There is no zero reason to nudge frame rates on export.
I checked. Apparently it records at different  fps near 29.97 so that's why the software suggest 29.97 as the best match.

« Reply #14 on: January 04, 2019, 11:28 »
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I had this problem suddenly come up at 29.97 frame rates. I started submitting at 30 fps and never had another problem. I think it may be how their programs are reading the metadata and perhaps rounding off.
I'm going to export in 30 fps even if the software suggest 29.97, to see if SS stop making problems
It's highly recommended to export in the same frame rate as you shot it. There is no zero reason to nudge frame rates on export.
I checked. Apparently it records at different  fps near 29.97 so that's why the software suggest 29.97 as the best match.
You should be able to set your recording frame rate to 29.97 or 30 or 25 or 23.98 or 24 and your software should be able to export at whatever you recorded at.

« Reply #15 on: January 04, 2019, 11:30 »
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I had this problem suddenly come up at 29.97 frame rates. I started submitting at 30 fps and never had another problem. I think it may be how their programs are reading the metadata and perhaps rounding off.
I'm going to export in 30 fps even if the software suggest 29.97, to see if SS stop making problems
It's highly recommended to export in the same frame rate as you shot it. There is no zero reason to nudge frame rates on export.
I checked. Apparently it records at different  fps near 29.97 so that's why the software suggest 29.97 as the best match.
You should be able to set your recording frame rate to 29.97 or 30 or 25 or 23.98 or 24 and your software should be able to export at whatever you recorded at.
I know right? But it seems like I can't set that on my phone. I can set the export fps tho but it suggest 29.97 to "match the fps content" but the original files are in different values between 29.8 and 30. Weird.
« Last Edit: January 04, 2019, 12:11 by davidbautista »

« Reply #16 on: January 04, 2019, 12:09 »
+1
I had this problem suddenly come up at 29.97 frame rates. I started submitting at 30 fps and never had another problem. I think it may be how their programs are reading the metadata and perhaps rounding off.
I'm going to export in 30 fps even if the software suggest 29.97, to see if SS stop making problems
It's highly recommended to export in the same frame rate as you shot it. There is no zero reason to nudge frame rates on export.
I checked. Apparently it records at different  fps near 29.97 so that's why the software suggest 29.97 as the best match.
You should be able to set your recording frame rate to 29.97 or 30 or 25 or 23.98 or 24 and your software should be able to export at whatever you recorded at.

Phones cannot be trusted to do as they're told, unfortunately. Many videos I've examined myself were of course set to 29.97 or 30, but in reality, if the phone can't handle it, it will lower the frame rate to 28 or something else.

You need to double check every video you film with a phone and use an application that can force the video to play back at a standard frame rate.

Simply choosing "export at 30" does not necessarily fix the problem. Depending on the application, it may just add 2 extra (duplicate) frames each second, resulting in stuttering.

You probably need to use a professional application like After Effects, where you can choose to "Interpret" each clip at a standard frame rate. If it was filmed at 28 fps for example, AE will then speed it up slightly so it plays back at 30, or slow it down to 25 or 24, your choice.
« Last Edit: January 04, 2019, 12:13 by increasingdifficulty »


« Reply #17 on: January 04, 2019, 20:00 »
0
I had this problem suddenly come up at 29.97 frame rates. I started submitting at 30 fps and never had another problem. I think it may be how their programs are reading the metadata and perhaps rounding off.
I'm going to export in 30 fps even if the software suggest 29.97, to see if SS stop making problems
It's highly recommended to export in the same frame rate as you shot it. There is no zero reason to nudge frame rates on export.
I checked. Apparently it records at different  fps near 29.97 so that's why the software suggest 29.97 as the best match.
You should be able to set your recording frame rate to 29.97 or 30 or 25 or 23.98 or 24 and your software should be able to export at whatever you recorded at.

Phones cannot be trusted to do as they're told, unfortunately. Many videos I've examined myself were of course set to 29.97 or 30, but in reality, if the phone can't handle it, it will lower the frame rate to 28 or something else.

You need to double check every video you film with a phone and use an application that can force the video to play back at a standard frame rate.

Simply choosing "export at 30" does not necessarily fix the problem. Depending on the application, it may just add 2 extra (duplicate) frames each second, resulting in stuttering.

You probably need to use a professional application like After Effects, where you can choose to "Interpret" each clip at a standard frame rate. If it was filmed at 28 fps for example, AE will then speed it up slightly so it plays back at 30, or slow it down to 25 or 24, your choice.

Thanks a lot! I will take into account that recommendation.

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