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Author Topic: Why my shutterstock account has been disabled ?  (Read 18388 times)

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Shelma1

« Reply #50 on: December 26, 2017, 07:14 »
+8
The OP started out sounding innocent and confused and then gradually told us all the things he did to launder money through Shutterstock.

It's good to know SS shuts this sort of thing down relatively quickly, otherwise all of us would lose our sales to fraudulent money launderers who create a small, barely selling ports and then get their buddies to buy their images with stolen credit cards.


SpaceStockFootage

  • Space, Sci-Fi and Astronomy Related Stock Footage

« Reply #51 on: December 26, 2017, 07:29 »
+6
And where did you find this e-marketer? Down the pub... on some random website? What exactly did you sign up for... what was he saying he'd provide... and I'm curious how much he was charging you?

If I could find a marketer that doubled my monthly sales I'd be very surprised, but increasing it 200 fold? I don't know how you'd do that without doing something dodgy. Stuff sell or it doesn't sell. You can make it sell a bit more, but not crazy amounts.
« Last Edit: December 26, 2017, 07:32 by SpaceStockFootage »

Shelma1

« Reply #52 on: December 26, 2017, 09:19 »
+6
Wouldn't it be great if sharing links to your port increased your sales 10,000% overnight? I'd share a couple links and retire to the tropics.

« Reply #53 on: December 26, 2017, 09:35 »
+2
Wouldn't it be great if sharing links to your port increased your sales 10,000% overnight? I'd share a couple links and retire to the tropics.

Another + for that one too. If I got 5% I'd think it was a market success.

« Reply #54 on: December 27, 2017, 17:47 »
0
In fact I do not know this marketer and did not find he
Actually he is who found me

You have to imagine, someone sends you a message on Facebook and tells you that he can change the situation
The earnings will multiply and he's seems sure, Wow great deal is not it  when the price is too little?
He says to me he has a great skill in marketing

And now I am in a state of confusion, so I do not exaggerate when I ask myself who I should believe, and who I should lie?

Was he is a quorum? Was he a criminal? Or is there only a misunderstanding? What is going on in this life?
« Last Edit: December 27, 2017, 17:51 by mohamed »

ShadySue

« Reply #55 on: December 27, 2017, 17:52 »
+2
In fact I do not know this marketer and did not find he
Actually he is who found me
You have to imagine, someone sends you a message on Facebook and tells you that he can change the situation
The earnings will multiply and he's seems sure, Wow great deal is not it  when the price is too little?
He says to me he has a great skill in marketing
Hmmm, like the Nigerian Princes who are going to make me a millionaire?
Looks like you've fallen for a scam, and are having to learn the hard way.  :(

« Reply #56 on: December 27, 2017, 18:05 »
0
He showed me some downloads on the first day. he show me he is serious, I do not have marketing experience but I am impressed

What makes me refuse? Maybe life is not complicated just for those who understand it and he provides support for me, why should I refuse?

He did not ask for passwords and did not give me any links to click on it and did not ask for personal data
It seems like no risk? If you were my place would you refuse?
« Last Edit: December 27, 2017, 18:11 by mohamed »

niktol

« Reply #57 on: December 27, 2017, 19:05 »
+2

He did not ask for passwords and did not give me any links to click on it and did not ask for personal data


Think it through and make sure the SS account is the only thing you lost. It wasn't bringing you lotsa money anyway, so small price to pay. Do not resume contact even if promised to restore the account or you might lose more.

« Reply #58 on: December 27, 2017, 20:49 »
+3
He showed me some downloads on the first day. he show me he is serious, I do not have marketing experience but I am impressed

What makes me refuse? Maybe life is not complicated just for those who understand it and he provides support for me, why should I refuse?

He did not ask for passwords and did not give me any links to click on it and did not ask for personal data
It seems like no risk? If you were my place would you refuse?


Some good rules of thumb:
1. If it seems too good to be true, it is. Especially in microstock.
2. Stay away from people contacting you on/from the internet. Chances are they are scammers. If you can't meet with them or talk to them in person, or can't verify recommendations, steer clear
3. In your place, yes, I would refuse. In fact, I have gotten quite a few emails from such people, and would NEVER trust anyone whom I did not know personally, or came recommended by someone I knew.
4. Just because they don't ask for passwords, doesn't mean they can't scam. Somehow this person managed to connect himself to your SS account, and now you are screwed.


Yes, you have learned the hard way.


« Reply #59 on: December 28, 2017, 02:57 »
+3
If you were my place would you refuse?

for sure

Brasilnut

  • Author Brutally Honest Guide to Microstock & Blog

« Reply #60 on: December 28, 2017, 06:47 »
0
Quote
  I'd share a couple links and retire to the tropics.

Brazil?  ;) don't forget the sunscreen!  8)

steheap

  • Author of best selling "Get Started in Stock"

« Reply #61 on: December 28, 2017, 09:49 »
+6
I've been trying to work out this scam - it can't be that the scammer wants some small payment to generate all the Enhanced License downloads. It can't be that they want the images themselves (as they could get them from our favorite free site). It can't be that these specific images or illustrations are fantastic. It must be that they are going to download lots of images with a high payout with a stolen credit card AND have a way to get at the money being paid for the downloads. That seems to be the only way to defraud Shutterstock in a way where you end up with cash, not a few lousy image files.

So the fraud must work by making an arrangement with the contributor to share the revenue that the image sales generate. How else could it work?

« Reply #62 on: December 28, 2017, 11:54 »
0
I've been trying to work out this scam - it can't be that the scammer wants some small payment to generate all the Enhanced License downloads. It can't be that they want the images themselves (as they could get them from our favorite free site). It can't be that these specific images or illustrations are fantastic. It must be that they are going to download lots of images with a high payout with a stolen credit card AND have a way to get at the money being paid for the downloads. That seems to be the only way to defraud Shutterstock in a way where you end up with cash, not a few lousy image files.

So the fraud must work by making an arrangement with the contributor to share the revenue that the image sales generate. How else could it work?

I wouldn't think its an agreement so much as its just the same people doing the uploading and the buying.

Credit card numbers cost next to nothing. Any way they can find to get any cash off them is ideal for a criminal or criminal gang. Even if they only get 20-30% like in this case.

Normally they have to buy items and sell them on cheap, or even try buying vouchers and selling them on at lower than face value. Much easier and less risky to open an account with an image library and upload a load of images you have stolen off the internet, buy some licenses with the credit cards then cash out. They could probably set up a program to do it all automatically, another advantage as apparently criminals usually buy huge lists of credit card numbers only some of which work.

Set up a computer to run through the list of stolen credit card numbers and set up buyer accounts spoofing a new internet address for each. Then the account also automatically makes some random purchases plus a few big ones from your own contributor account, done.

« Reply #63 on: December 28, 2017, 12:06 »
0
I've been trying to work out this scam - it can't be that the scammer wants some small payment to generate all the Enhanced License downloads. It can't be that they want the images themselves (as they could get them from our favorite free site). It can't be that these specific images or illustrations are fantastic. It must be that they are going to download lots of images with a high payout with a stolen credit card AND have a way to get at the money being paid for the downloads. That seems to be the only way to defraud Shutterstock in a way where you end up with cash, not a few lousy image files.

So the fraud must work by making an arrangement with the contributor to share the revenue that the image sales generate. How else could it work?

I wouldn't think its an agreement so much as its just the same people doing the uploading and the buying.

Credit card numbers cost next to nothing. Any way they can find to get any cash off them is ideal for a criminal or criminal gang. Even if they only get 20-30% like in this case.

Normally they have to buy items and sell them on cheap, or even try buying vouchers and selling them on at lower than face value. Much easier and less risky to open an account with an image library and upload a load of images you have stolen off the internet, buy some licenses with the credit cards then cash out. They could probably set up a program to do it all automatically, another advantage as apparently criminals usually buy huge lists of credit card numbers only some of which work.

Set up a computer to run through the list of stolen credit card numbers and set up buyer accounts spoofing a new internet address for each. Then the account also automatically makes some random purchases plus a few big ones from your own contributor account, done.

Only one problem, your theories do not work with microstock given the delay between accepting payment and payout.  The contributor did not cash out.

Shelma1

« Reply #64 on: December 28, 2017, 12:40 »
+3
I've been trying to work out this scam - it can't be that the scammer wants some small payment to generate all the Enhanced License downloads. It can't be that they want the images themselves (as they could get them from our favorite free site). It can't be that these specific images or illustrations are fantastic. It must be that they are going to download lots of images with a high payout with a stolen credit card AND have a way to get at the money being paid for the downloads. That seems to be the only way to defraud Shutterstock in a way where you end up with cash, not a few lousy image files.

So the fraud must work by making an arrangement with the contributor to share the revenue that the image sales generate. How else could it work?

I wouldn't think its an agreement so much as its just the same people doing the uploading and the buying.

Credit card numbers cost next to nothing. Any way they can find to get any cash off them is ideal for a criminal or criminal gang. Even if they only get 20-30% like in this case.

Normally they have to buy items and sell them on cheap, or even try buying vouchers and selling them on at lower than face value. Much easier and less risky to open an account with an image library and upload a load of images you have stolen off the internet, buy some licenses with the credit cards then cash out. They could probably set up a program to do it all automatically, another advantage as apparently criminals usually buy huge lists of credit card numbers only some of which work.

Set up a computer to run through the list of stolen credit card numbers and set up buyer accounts spoofing a new internet address for each. Then the account also automatically makes some random purchases plus a few big ones from your own contributor account, done.

Only one problem, your theories do not work with microstock given the delay between accepting payment and payout.  The contributor did not cash out.

Probably made it too obvious by buying too many images at too high a price in one month. Must have raised red flags.

« Reply #65 on: December 28, 2017, 15:10 »
0
I still do not understand, and my mind does not want to believe that, I did nothing and then lost everything ?

What if that was what the criminal want from the start? Maybe closing my account is a goal, to eliminate on me or revenge for someone else?

Maybe all you think is just suspicion
Maybe SS think this too
Maybe SS have worried about the volatility of overnight profit

The support of SS does not respond to me, it seems that my e-mail in spam folder for them now.

Shelma1

« Reply #66 on: December 28, 2017, 15:17 »
+7
You lost nothing, because the sales were fraudulent. They weren't real. Also, you don't have to request payout from SS; it happens automatically. Your entire story smells fishy.


« Reply #67 on: December 28, 2017, 15:33 »
+1
Easy way to clear this up. Provide links to your portfolio elsewhere and we will see if you are a legit contributor.

« Reply #68 on: December 28, 2017, 15:45 »
0
I lost my portfolio and lost Shutterstock buyers forever, and I do not know if there are any other hidden risks!

SS approved my personal data, passport photo and tax form
How can I be suspicious if I am honest?

All that the marketer got from me was the link to my portfolio then did something I do not know
ِAnd here are people who think about me a fishy
So how to publish any links in the Public ?

Shelma1

« Reply #69 on: December 28, 2017, 16:30 »
+9
When you start out your story pretending to be confused and innocent and then later admit that you paid an "e-marketer" who magically made your sales increase by thousands of percentages overnight, and all your sales were non-sub sales, then yeah, your story smells pretty fishy.

You lost a port with a couple hundred vectors that had almost no sales for three years. That means you weren't serious about it.

You keep asking us how you can avoid doing something wrong in the future...it sounds like you're digging for hints so you're not found out next time.

Submit your work elsewhere and play by the rules. If you want more sales, submit more work and better work.

« Reply #70 on: December 29, 2017, 04:00 »
+8
I lost my portfolio and lost Shutterstock buyers forever...

You said you had 140 vectors. Created during 3 years. You didnt put much work in it, did you?.... And your sales were minimal before the mysterious "e-marketer" stepped in, so the Shutterstock buyers you lost were not interested in your images anyway. You didnt have any sales before, you lost nothing. Why didnt you earn the money through normal sales? You had the whole 3 years for it. I dont know what you keep complaining about, you tried to cheat, you got caught, end of story.

« Reply #71 on: December 29, 2017, 23:19 »
0
I'm sad to what I hear, are being easily charged to people?
Why do you think you are a detective? Why do you trust your uncertain analysis?
At first I did not expect the marketer to have anything to do with this, so I only talked about the important things.

When you start your own business it is like your son, raise it on your hands and see it grow up in front of your eyes, you should think like all people to get an e-marketer. The future is going to them? I was did not see marketers as fraudsters.
When he told me he can market my portfolio, I have feel happy and I was think it good thing

What are my guilt here, I have a marketer to market my portfolio?

Regardless of whether the marketer is accused or not, this too has not been proved, and my images was continuing in sales in 3th years did not stop and this shows the admiration of people.

I feel that you are shutterstock lawyer, you do not want to hear and just decompose and then draw accusations on uncertain analyzes.

Let me tell you that you have do like a shutterstock, for you accused The defendant is convicted until proven innocent. Oh really ?

Thank you and sorry for my English
« Last Edit: December 29, 2017, 23:24 by mohamed »

SpaceStockFootage

  • Space, Sci-Fi and Astronomy Related Stock Footage

« Reply #72 on: December 29, 2017, 23:46 »
+2
Unless I'm missing something, I'm not getting the impression that this guy was in on the scam. He just seems to be very naive. I mean the following statement proves that...

"When you start your own business it is like your son, raise it on your hands and see it grow up in front of your eyes, you should think like all people to get an e-marketer. The future is going to them?"

I think I'll pass on that one, based on the results! Or if I did get one... I'll seek out a marketer myself, qualify them, check case studies, testimonials, check those testimonials are real by real people and real companies, check the address isn't some virtual mailbox or a shed in the middle of nowhere etc etc. I'm not going to accept the services of somebody who comes out of the blue.

It's the same reason I don't have cupboards full of penis pumps and Viagra... I don't accept every offer that comes into my mailbox. If you're not from an officially recognised guild of penis pump craftsmen, you're not getting my business.
 

« Reply #73 on: December 30, 2017, 00:07 »
0
Unless I'm missing something, I'm not getting the impression that this guy was in on the scam. He just seems to be very naive. I mean the following statement proves that...

"When you start your own business it is like your son, raise it on your hands and see it grow up in front of your eyes, you should think like all people to get an e-marketer. The future is going to them?"

I think I'll pass on that one, based on the results! Or if I did get one... I'll seek out a marketer myself, qualify them, check case studies, testimonials, check those testimonials are real by real people and real companies, check the address isn't some virtual mailbox or a shed in the middle of nowhere etc etc. I'm not going to accept the services of somebody who comes out of the blue.

It's the same reason I don't have cupboards full of penis pumps and Viagra... I don't accept every offer that comes into my mailbox. If you're not from an officially recognised guild of penis pump craftsmen, you're not getting my business.

I am really a beginner in this way
It seems that I was nave because I did not read the instruction manual, as wisdom says

We know that no one learns free of this life. maybe what I hear now and what happened to me is the price of learning a lesson to become an adult.

I'm sorry for everyone, but please consider my feelings

Thank you all I have really benefited from this long debate

ShadySue

« Reply #74 on: December 30, 2017, 07:22 »
+11
When you start your own business it is like your son,
Please promise your future children (daughters also matter) that you will not under any circumstances allow them to be looked after by some random stranger who approaches you in person or online and offers to look after them.


 

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