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Author Topic: Dynamic Photo HDR  (Read 12419 times)

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« on: March 23, 2010, 20:15 »
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I received an email from SWREG offering this for US$40.

MediaChance Dynamic Photo HDR

The demo video is impressive.  There is a trial version, anyone in?


« Reply #1 on: March 23, 2010, 20:40 »
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Yup, it's very nice, but it also makes noise...it's unavoidable I guess.

« Reply #2 on: March 23, 2010, 20:51 »
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Yes, I suppose, but doesn't Photomatix too?

It would be interesting if someone who is used to HDR editing would test this and give some opinion.  ;D

WarrenPrice

« Reply #3 on: March 23, 2010, 21:49 »
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I've used it, Maria.  I can't make any comparison because I haven't used Photomatix, but I have had HDR images accepted.  Here is one that DT accepted:



edit:  ooops, sorry.  guess I need a tutorial on how to insert an image?   ::)

Trying again:
« Last Edit: March 23, 2010, 22:21 by WarrenPrice »

« Reply #4 on: March 23, 2010, 22:50 »
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I've used this software for a couple years and really like it.  Like any other HDR software you have to go easy on the effects of it wont get accepted.

« Reply #5 on: March 23, 2010, 23:00 »
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I used it here:



but for Istock I had to decrease the effect a bit.

« Reply #6 on: March 24, 2010, 02:38 »
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[email protected]   It feels very much that could be done without a hdr software. Maybe "shadow highlights" in Ps.  Or like a  simple composite of two exposures with layermask.   But ofcourse I havent seen the original.

« Reply #7 on: March 24, 2010, 08:31 »
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Yes, I suppose, but doesn't Photomatix too?

It would be interesting if someone who is used to HDR editing would test this and give some opinion.  ;D

Hi Madelaide,

You don't need a special software if you have PS.
I have PS4 and it has HDR option.

Kone

« Reply #8 on: March 24, 2010, 08:51 »
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What I understand, its the tonemapping that is different (easier) with these softwares.    Im not sure how to get same result in Ps though...

« Reply #9 on: March 24, 2010, 09:12 »
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Here's one I did in Photoshop.  It isn't too hard to create two images to merge together using Camera Raw

« Reply #10 on: March 24, 2010, 15:56 »
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What I understand, its the tonemapping that is different (easier) with these softwares.    Im not sure how to get same result in Ps though...

Here,

I am not an expert but I did try it few times, Leaf you should make a video-tutorial on this one

I suggest, do not use JPEG-s use TIFF-s

From one RAW image (as Leaf mentioned).

Develop (optimize) one TIFF for the shadows and a second for the highlights.
1. Set your RAW Converter output to PS as 16 bit files.
2. Clean images, dust spots etc, in PS and save each image as 16bit TIFF.
3. Use: File/Automation/Merge to HDR (I have CS4) to open and merge the TIFFs.

Kone

« Reply #11 on: March 24, 2010, 16:14 »
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Or push "shadow/highlights" and play around with settings for 10 sec.     ONE image contains same amount of info nomatter what u do.  Merge or no merge.   

« Reply #12 on: March 24, 2010, 16:23 »
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Or push "shadow/highlights" and play around with settings for 10 sec.     ONE image contains same amount of info nomatter what u do.  Merge or no merge.   

You are right.

Kone

« Reply #13 on: March 24, 2010, 17:54 »
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One time I find free open source application which generates 3 pseudo RAW files from One Raw file shoot and final result is that there are NO noise. But I cand find it again  >:(
With that you can make HDR from moving subjects because it is only one shoot.
I cant remember if its for Linux only or other OS too.
Anybody hear something about it?

« Reply #14 on: March 24, 2010, 18:39 »
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i enjoy doing dynamic range photography . and also play alot with the shad/hi
in PS for non hdr images.

but i would never submit these images to IS. that would be suicidal. as you're sure to get a barrel of rejections due to overprocessed.
otoh, i would send the busload of them to SS who crave these sort of over saturation.

one caution though. if you 're doing people, i would stay away from ext dyn.
not unless you're the type who prefer red shadows  ;D

« Reply #15 on: March 24, 2010, 19:21 »
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I don't have PS, but PSP X2 has a HDR filter, however not as powerful as this one, judging by the number of settings available. I never seriously tried HDR yet, in fact, only played with one image with lots of shadows and highlights, creating the fake extra versions for merging.

I wasn't considering this for microstock, but I thought it might help cretae some eyecatching images.

« Reply #16 on: March 24, 2010, 19:24 »
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Here's one I did in Photoshop.  It isn't too hard to create two images to merge together using Camera Raw



Beautiful!

« Reply #17 on: March 25, 2010, 08:51 »
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i enjoy doing dynamic range photography . and also play alot with the shad/hi
in PS for non hdr images.

but i would never submit these images to IS. that would be suicidal. as you're sure to get a barrel of rejections due to overprocessed.
otoh, i would send the busload of them to SS who crave these sort of over saturation.

one caution though. if you 're doing people, i would stay away from ext dyn.
not unless you're the type who prefer red shadows  ;D


Belive or not this is HDR image

http://www.istockphoto.com/file_closeup.php?id=11687862

« Reply #18 on: March 25, 2010, 10:34 »
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1) You cant submit HDR - HDR is 32bit image in special format
2) You can submit HDRI (that is HDR processed with some tone mapping process into 8bit image)
3) There are various programs to work with HDR
4) True HDRI has LOWER not higher noise then normal exposure, but you have to edit it properly and not push it to the limits in Photomatix
5) You cant create HDR from just one single RAW - it has 12-14bit of data where often are 2-4 bits absolutely useless (unlike what you hear from Canon/Nikon etc.) - that is in best just mid dynamic range very far from 32 bit. You can do pseudo-HDRI from one single RAW, however you dont have to merge etc. - Photomatix can tonemap just one single RAW or you can do it directly in CameraRaw with pushing "fill shadows", "contrast" etc. to very high numbers - you will get something similar to HDRI but with lower dynamic range and often horrible noise and nasty halos.
6) You can use HDR to create unnatural (Im not saying bad) HDRI pictures or to create great natural looking pictures with full dynamic range (and you will not recognize its HDRI) - it depends on what you want. You can create realistic pictures even with Photomatix or create overprocessed horrible things even in PS - just depends on editing.

« Reply #19 on: March 26, 2010, 09:14 »
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What I understand, its the tonemapping that is different (easier) with these softwares.    Im not sure how to get same result in Ps though...


Here,

I am not an expert but I did try it few times, Leaf you should make a video-tutorial on this one

I suggest, do not use JPEG-s use TIFF-s

From one RAW image (as Leaf mentioned).

Develop (optimize) one TIFF for the shadows and a second for the highlights.
1. Set your RAW Converter output to PS as 16 bit files.
2. Clean images, dust spots etc, in PS and save each image as 16bit TIFF.
3. Use: File/Automation/Merge to HDR (I have CS4) to open and merge the TIFFs.

Kone


Here's your tutorial :)
Photoshop Tutorial: Creating an HDR Image From A Single RAW File [In-Depth] Intermediate

« Reply #20 on: March 26, 2010, 11:04 »
0
Excellent Leaf...thanks!


 

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