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Author Topic: How to shoot static timelapses  (Read 12792 times)

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« Reply #50 on: March 30, 2018, 19:47 »
0
By the way, how do you go about previewing all those huge files from the camera? Load them all into Lightroom and wait for the previews? Shoot RAW + jpg?

If you haven't tried it already, I can really recommend a small little tool called ERawP, which extracts all embedded jpg preview files that hide inside every RAW file.

I don't shoot RAW + jpg, I just drop the RAW files into ErawP, and boom, within a few seconds it extracts all the embedded jpg previews so I can quickly look through all the images without having to open any applications at all.

It has probably saved me a couple of work weeks.  :)
To preview the 8k file I am using more end more the preview in LRTimelpse, very fast.
The main thing I need to check is if I need stabiliser, in which case I have to go through AE.
If I can avoid going to AE, I do everything in LRT (including encoding) and the process is a breeze, very fast.
If I need to go to AE, the computer get grilled , it takes forever and often the PC crashes

Fast for the original. Once you use Visual Workflow then not so fast if you want to see anything corrected from Lightroom.  I think Gunther has a huge opportunity to do a better job in that area.  You have to wait for all those DNG previews in order to use Deficker.  That's not productive. But you are correct for a quick raw preview.
Hi Mantis,
are you talking about the new version 5?
I consider the rendered preview in LRT5 for 8k files really fast compared to After Effects, where they are incredibly slow to load and can even crash my computer

If I have, say a 900 image TL in RAW, then drag it to LR, make my adjustments, save metadata to file, then reload in LRT, I have to go through visual previews before I can deflicker. That takes about 45 minutes to get through 900 images...time wasted if I just sat there. Haven't used AE, though so I only have my beer count as a comparison:)


« Reply #51 on: April 02, 2018, 05:48 »
0
By the way, how do you go about previewing all those huge files from the camera? Load them all into Lightroom and wait for the previews? Shoot RAW + jpg?

If you haven't tried it already, I can really recommend a small little tool called ERawP, which extracts all embedded jpg preview files that hide inside every RAW file.

I don't shoot RAW + jpg, I just drop the RAW files into ErawP, and boom, within a few seconds it extracts all the embedded jpg previews so I can quickly look through all the images without having to open any applications at all.

It has probably saved me a couple of work weeks.  :)
To preview the 8k file I am using more end more the preview in LRTimelpse, very fast.
The main thing I need to check is if I need stabiliser, in which case I have to go through AE.
If I can avoid going to AE, I do everything in LRT (including encoding) and the process is a breeze, very fast.
If I need to go to AE, the computer get grilled , it takes forever and often the PC crashes

Fast for the original. Once you use Visual Workflow then not so fast if you want to see anything corrected from Lightroom.  I think Gunther has a huge opportunity to do a better job in that area.  You have to wait for all those DNG previews in order to use Deficker.  That's not productive. But you are correct for a quick raw preview.
Hi Mantis,
are you talking about the new version 5?
I consider the rendered preview in LRT5 for 8k files really fast compared to After Effects, where they are incredibly slow to load and can even crash my computer

If I have, say a 900 image TL in RAW, then drag it to LR, make my adjustments, save metadata to file, then reload in LRT, I have to go through visual previews before I can deflicker. That takes about 45 minutes to get through 900 images...time wasted if I just sat there. Haven't used AE, though so I only have my beer count as a comparison:)
These days I try to go much more for quality rather than quantity. I am quite happy to produce 25 to 35 timelapses per month, but I try to choose the subjects very carefully. Of course when I do drone footage I can produce more.
My timelapses are generally 300 frames and when using only LR and LRTimelapse 5 (with 8k files from the D850), the average time for post processing is about 30 minutes from start to finish, including encoding. I consider it perfectly acceptable. What is more the resources of my computer are not fully occupied, so I can do other work in the meantime.
When I have to use After Effect for stabilising or other reasons, the post processing for a single timelapse can be 2 or 3 hours and I have to close all other applications and cannot do any other work

« Reply #52 on: April 02, 2018, 14:40 »
0
the average time for post processing is about 30 minutes from start to finish, including encoding. I consider it perfectly acceptable.

I don't think I've ever finished a clip that fast.  :D Barely a regular clip.

I've been doing more and more work in post, making composites and tweaks that real life didn't offer. Not to mention there's not much worth time lapsing where I live when the environment isn't lush and green (soon we're back in beauty mode). Living in London would of course offer much more year round.

But for composites and heavy editing I need After Effects. Rendering is slow, but to me it's definitely worth it. Not to mention it's a lot of fun! What REALLY takes time is rendering something in Cinema 4D and bringing it into After Effects... That can be 12-20 hours for a few seconds...

Whatever works for each of us is good I suppose!

« Reply #53 on: April 02, 2018, 15:56 »
+1
Same goes for me, post processing timelapse clips is rather a process of days and sometimes even weeks per shot.
Mainly nature: tidal movements, starscapes, aeolian sand movements on the beach etcetera.

« Reply #54 on: July 19, 2018, 04:13 »
0
the average time for post processing is about 30 minutes from start to finish, including encoding. I consider it perfectly acceptable.

I don't think I've ever finished a clip that fast.  :D Barely a regular clip.

I've been doing more and more work in post, making composites and tweaks that real life didn't offer. Not to mention there's not much worth time lapsing where I live when the environment isn't lush and green (soon we're back in beauty mode). Living in London would of course offer much more year round.

But for composites and heavy editing I need After Effects. Rendering is slow, but to me it's definitely worth it. Not to mention it's a lot of fun! What REALLY takes time is rendering something in Cinema 4D and bringing it into After Effects... That can be 12-20 hours for a few seconds...

Whatever works for each of us is good I suppose!
Sure, I agree: it depends where you live.
Big cities offer good opportunities for urban timelapses. If living in more remote areas, then other sort of images are more interesting, maybe nature shots with drones.
I lived for about two years in Brighton and I was doing a lot of drone shots in the South coast, while now in London drones are very hard to use
Where about do you live?

« Reply #55 on: July 22, 2018, 03:16 »
0
I've been using LRT for a while, its pretty cool how well it works.

After effects almost always throws up an error so have almost never used it. Love

Love how well you've been discussing this

« Reply #56 on: July 22, 2018, 09:21 »
0
I've been using LRT for a while, its pretty cool how well it works.

After effects almost always throws up an error so have almost never used it. Love

Love how well you've been discussing this
Thank you!


 

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