pancakes

MicrostockGroup Sponsors


Author Topic: Alamy- Tips on getting Sales  (Read 28126 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Goofy

« on: August 07, 2014, 11:12 »
0
Okay, I've tried everything I can think of on how to get better results (sales) on Alamy but nothing seems to work for me.  Any tips on how to keyword or if I should include more information on the other areas?

Thanks

 8)



« Reply #1 on: August 07, 2014, 12:46 »
0
Forget it.  I had about a dozen sales in 2012 and maybe 15 in 2013.  So far this year, exactly 1 (one) sale.   

It's over. 

Goofy

« Reply #2 on: August 07, 2014, 13:43 »
0
Forget it.  I had about a dozen sales in 2012 and maybe 15 in 2013.  So far this year, exactly 1 (one) sale.   

It's over.

sad to hear the news...

« Reply #3 on: August 08, 2014, 00:31 »
+3
Till July I sold more than in whole 2013. It'll be BYE :)

My tips:
- take a photo (what photo?*),
- prepare it (IPTC with perfect title, description and keywords when post processing),
- upload (about 10-100 in batch),
- repeat all above and don't look back over.

For me it works quite well ;)

To be serious. It's not a magic trick. I wrote about it before - I had better sales after delete some images from micros. I take care what is zoomed (your account in Alamy). Micro pricing is against my business in that case.


* Various photos! One of last sales was image of garbage in water, river after flood with plastic bottles, cans etc. (for $125) Few days later some tulip flowers growing, herb plant as well, food isolated and not isolated, ... RF and RM, doesn't matter.


May I see what kind of images you have? How many files in portfolio? PM me?

« Reply #4 on: August 08, 2014, 01:09 »
+1
Alamy is not micro.  Think differently, use images that are edgier than micro.  Their core is news, books and editorial not commercial advertising.  People doing things, illustrate an event, show something happening.
They do sell but think 5 sales per month instead of per hour like SS.  Still they are my #2 agency.  I have all micro images in a separate pseudo and a different pseudo for all RM images.  Both sell.
Be careful with keywords, use only what really fits.

« Reply #5 on: August 08, 2014, 03:50 »
+6
Okay, I've tried everything I can think of on how to get better results (sales) on Alamy but nothing seems to work for me.  Any tips on how to keyword or if I should include more information on the other areas?

Thanks

 8)

We're selling more images than ever before in our 15 year history so there is plenty of opportunity for revenue with us.

We are very different to microstock so a different strategy is needed. We sell licences from $10 up to $10,000+ but the average price per sale is around $100. You can expect to make fewer sales than you do on MS but for higher value.

You don't mention how many images you have or the type of work you have in your portfolio so it's impossible for us to give you any specific advice but if you want to post a link to your collection here we'd be happy to give you some pointers.

The photographers who do best with us submit well edited work regularly and keyword (relevantly) and thoroughly...

Cheers

Alamy

ShadySue

« Reply #6 on: August 08, 2014, 05:17 »
+1
For those unfamiliar with Alamy, be aware that is $100 gross, of which we get $50 or $40. That is still a lot higher than my average - because I'm still in the UK newspaper scheme, which nets less than iS (exc).
In 2013, my sales at Alamy increased nicely; in 2014 they have shot down steeply, despite my CTR recently being around 4x Alamy's overall.
I only sell RM there and it may be that RF sells better. The people I read of who have good sales generally have upwards of 10,000 files.
« Last Edit: August 08, 2014, 07:46 by ShadySue »

Hobostocker

    This user is banned.
« Reply #7 on: August 08, 2014, 06:15 »
0
for instance, the BBC website is using Alamy photos amost every day.
most of them are about travel locations and "people doing things".

i'm selling exactly that on alamy, no idea how other niches will perform, but the 100$ gross average is a bit on the high end in my experience.


 

« Reply #8 on: August 08, 2014, 07:27 »
+3
Okay, I've tried everything I can think of on how to get better results (sales) on Alamy but nothing seems to work for me.  Any tips on how to keyword or if I should include more information on the other areas?

Thanks

 8)

We're selling more images than ever before in our 15 year history so there is plenty of opportunity for revenue with us.

We are very different to microstock so a different strategy is needed. We sell licences from $10 up to $10,000+ but the average price per sale is around $100. You can expect to make fewer sales than you do on MS but for higher value.

You don't mention how many images you have or the type of work you have in your portfolio so it's impossible for us to give you any specific advice but if you want to post a link to your collection here we'd be happy to give you some pointers.

The photographers who do best with us submit well edited work regularly and keyword (relevantly) and thoroughly...

Cheers

Alamy

The bolded text I highlighted above says it all and Alamy doesn't fully fill in the blanks.  Alamy, how many images do YOU have and how many are being added per week? If you are adding, say, 200,000 per week (probably more), and you are adding, oh, I dunno, 100 new contributors per week, and Goofy, being one contributor, is adding 5 per week, the math and common sense should be the first explanation as to why sales are dropping (or non existent) for him and all contributors is pretty straight forward.  You can use the logic fairly, I suppose, that you are a very different market, but the root cause of declining or non existent sales is the amassing of a ginormous collection on a magnitude that is killing stock for photographers yet pumping up revenue for Alamy. It's simply spreading growing revenue over an even faster growing contributor base, that is the real reason, not so much a 'different market'.  I've been with you guys for around 8 years or thereabouts and I used to make A LOT more each month with my style of shooting, which hasn't changed much.  Today, I am lucky to make 1/4 of what I used to make. And I know that it is due to incredible image & contributor growth as a weighted priority over a 'different market'. I am not saying your market isn't different, just that this explanation is far lower on a weighted scale than collection growth as it relates to declining/non-existing sales.   

« Reply #9 on: August 08, 2014, 08:13 »
+8
Okay, I've tried everything I can think of on how to get better results (sales) on Alamy but nothing seems to work for me.  Any tips on how to keyword or if I should include more information on the other areas?

Thanks

 8)

We're selling more images than ever before in our 15 year history so there is plenty of opportunity for revenue with us.

We are very different to microstock so a different strategy is needed. We sell licences from $10 up to $10,000+ but the average price per sale is around $100. You can expect to make fewer sales than you do on MS but for higher value.

You don't mention how many images you have or the type of work you have in your portfolio so it's impossible for us to give you any specific advice but if you want to post a link to your collection here we'd be happy to give you some pointers.

The photographers who do best with us submit well edited work regularly and keyword (relevantly) and thoroughly...

Cheers

Alamy

The bolded text I highlighted above says it all and Alamy doesn't fully fill in the blanks.  Alamy, how many images do YOU have and how many are being added per week? If you are adding, say, 200,000 per week (probably more), and you are adding, oh, I dunno, 100 new contributors per week, and Goofy, being one contributor, is adding 5 per week, the math and common sense should be the first explanation as to why sales are dropping (or non existent) for him and all contributors is pretty straight forward.  You can use the logic fairly, I suppose, that you are a very different market, but the root cause of declining or non existent sales is the amassing of a ginormous collection on a magnitude that is killing stock for photographers yet pumping up revenue for Alamy. It's simply spreading growing revenue over an even faster growing contributor base, that is the real reason, not so much a 'different market'.  I've been with you guys for around 8 years or thereabouts and I used to make A LOT more each month with my style of shooting, which hasn't changed much.  Today, I am lucky to make 1/4 of what I used to make. And I know that it is due to incredible image & contributor growth as a weighted priority over a 'different market'. I am not saying your market isn't different, just that this explanation is far lower on a weighted scale than collection growth as it relates to declining/non-existing sales.   

If you're making less revenue than what you used to make in the past that could be down to a whole number of factors including:

- Increased competition across the whole market, not just on Alamy, are there better pictures available now of the subjects you shoot / shot?
- Not changing your content to suit the market (this is an example, without your name we don't know who you are or what your collection looks like). You do say though that your "style of shooting hasn't changed much". Buying habits and trends certainly have changed a lot in 8 years though.
- Not refreshing content to keep up with trends - eg if you shoot lifestyle, are your subjects now outdated etc?

The point is, we can't give any specifics to Goofy without knowing what his/her collection looks like and whatever way you look at it, the number of images he/she has submitted is important along with what we followed that statement with (but you didn't highlight) - the type of work they are producing. By type we're not only referring to the style/subject but also the quality and suitability for the market.

We've got contributors who make very good returns from only 1500 or so images and others who make very good returns from 50,000+ images - so number of images is important to an extent but not the be all and end all.

Sorry you feel that our collection is "killing stock for photographers yet pumping up revenue" for us. We remain one of the best places to sell your images if you're a stock shooter. We're non-exclusive and we offer 50% commission on all sales made.

We sell all kinds of imagery to all kinds of clients, but if you're submitting exactly the same work on Alamy that you have on the micros, it's feasible that a client will be aware of this and buy your work there. That's not to say you won't also sell this work with us, you will, but you have to be realistic with your expectations if you are submitting the same work elsewhere that is available much cheaper.

To get back on topic for the OP - if you're not comfortable sharing your details here please feel free to send us a PM and we'll be happy to look through your collection and give you some pointers as to where you can improve.

Cheers

Alamy
« Last Edit: August 08, 2014, 08:17 by Alamy »

« Reply #10 on: August 08, 2014, 08:24 »
-2
i joined Alamy from day 1 when they announced their maiden voyage here on MSG. i uploaded regularly, and my approval was 100%. granted, that the curator looked at one image and approves the rest, given that you know how to curate your own work.
the support was exemplary too, helping me consistently when i need to learn how to set the menu for editorials,etc.  my portfolio was regularly growing, but after awhile of no sales, no zooms,etc..
i noticed that my portfolio was not even listed in their list of photographers.
so i asked how am i to be visible if clients do not know i exist in their list of photographers.

i got a sort of gibberish response, and i deleted my account.
it was  a shame, because i liked the culture of Alamy ie. what they represented at the initial
. but as for this day, you see why i am not so gullible anymore when someone
announces they are the new flavour of the month, decade, whatever.

i see only vapor  ;)

« Reply #11 on: August 08, 2014, 08:53 »
+1
Okay, I've tried everything I can think of on how to get better results (sales) on Alamy but nothing seems to work for me.  Any tips on how to keyword or if I should include more information on the other areas?

Thanks

 8)

We're selling more images than ever before in our 15 year history so there is plenty of opportunity for revenue with us.

We are very different to microstock so a different strategy is needed. We sell licences from $10 up to $10,000+ but the average price per sale is around $100. You can expect to make fewer sales than you do on MS but for higher value.

You don't mention how many images you have or the type of work you have in your portfolio so it's impossible for us to give you any specific advice but if you want to post a link to your collection here we'd be happy to give you some pointers.

The photographers who do best with us submit well edited work regularly and keyword (relevantly) and thoroughly...

Cheers

Alamy

The bolded text I highlighted above says it all and Alamy doesn't fully fill in the blanks.  Alamy, how many images do YOU have and how many are being added per week? If you are adding, say, 200,000 per week (probably more), and you are adding, oh, I dunno, 100 new contributors per week, and Goofy, being one contributor, is adding 5 per week, the math and common sense should be the first explanation as to why sales are dropping (or non existent) for him and all contributors is pretty straight forward.  You can use the logic fairly, I suppose, that you are a very different market, but the root cause of declining or non existent sales is the amassing of a ginormous collection on a magnitude that is killing stock for photographers yet pumping up revenue for Alamy. It's simply spreading growing revenue over an even faster growing contributor base, that is the real reason, not so much a 'different market'.  I've been with you guys for around 8 years or thereabouts and I used to make A LOT more each month with my style of shooting, which hasn't changed much.  Today, I am lucky to make 1/4 of what I used to make. And I know that it is due to incredible image & contributor growth as a weighted priority over a 'different market'. I am not saying your market isn't different, just that this explanation is far lower on a weighted scale than collection growth as it relates to declining/non-existing sales.   

If you're making less revenue than what you used to make in the past that could be down to a whole number of factors including:

- Increased competition across the whole market, not just on Alamy, are there better pictures available now of the subjects you shoot / shot?
- Not changing your content to suit the market (this is an example, without your name we don't know who you are or what your collection looks like). You do say though that your "style of shooting hasn't changed much". Buying habits and trends certainly have changed a lot in 8 years though.
- Not refreshing content to keep up with trends - eg if you shoot lifestyle, are your subjects now outdated etc?

The point is, we can't give any specifics to Goofy without knowing what his/her collection looks like and whatever way you look at it, the number of images he/she has submitted is important along with what we followed that statement with (but you didn't highlight) - the type of work they are producing. By type we're not only referring to the style/subject but also the quality and suitability for the market.

We've got contributors who make very good returns from only 1500 or so images and others who make very good returns from 50,000+ images - so number of images is important to an extent but not the be all and end all.

Sorry you feel that our collection is "killing stock for photographers yet pumping up revenue" for us. We remain one of the best places to sell your images if you're a stock shooter. We're non-exclusive and we offer 50% commission on all sales made.

We sell all kinds of imagery to all kinds of clients, but if you're submitting exactly the same work on Alamy that you have on the micros, it's feasible that a client will be aware of this and buy your work there. That's not to say you won't also sell this work with us, you will, but you have to be realistic with your expectations if you are submitting the same work elsewhere that is available much cheaper.

To get back on topic for the OP - if you're not comfortable sharing your details here please feel free to send us a PM and we'll be happy to look through your collection and give you some pointers as to where you can improve.

Cheers

Alamy

I don't disagree with your overall assessment made above but I was referring to your statement that you're selling more images than ever before. If that's true then my statement is also true, regardless of the competitive landscape. The number of image sales is going up yet contributor sales are going down at alamy. That means two simple things. You are forced to lower pricing to compete with microstock even though you target a very different market, and you are spreading these increased, or growing, image sales across way more contributors. As far as my images, I have a very broad collection and continue to look for new ideas and shoot to those. I also have a niche collection. When I say that my style hasn't changed much, I meant that I use the same lighting techniques, studio set ups etc, but my breadth of subject matter is getting broader as I add content.  Not that in my previous comment I didn't dismiss your claims, just that my opinion, I believe, has more weight.

« Reply #12 on: August 08, 2014, 09:17 »
+3
i joined Alamy from day 1 when they announced their maiden voyage here on MSG. i uploaded regularly, and my approval was 100%. granted, that the curator looked at one image and approves the rest, given that you know how to curate your own work.
the support was exemplary too, helping me consistently when i need to learn how to set the menu for editorials,etc.  my portfolio was regularly growing, but after awhile of no sales, no zooms,etc..
i noticed that my portfolio was not even listed in their list of photographers.
so i asked how am i to be visible if clients do not know i exist in their list of photographers.

i got a sort of gibberish response, and i deleted my account.
it was  a shame, because i liked the culture of Alamy ie. what they represented at the initial
. but as for this day, you see why i am not so gullible anymore when someone
announces they are the new flavour of the month, decade, whatever.

i see only vapor  ;)

Really sorry to read this! Just for the record, it wasn't us who -1'd your post :)

The list of photographers we had was a trial brand page that contained links to most of the agencies who sell through us and around 100 of the more well known 'brand' photographers.

Considering we have 37,000+ photographers with images online with us, you can see that the vast majority of contributors were not on the list!

Aside from all that, the page got very little traffic and it no longer exists. Customers find work on Alamy via keyword search, not via any list of photographers.

Cheers

Alamy

Ed

« Reply #13 on: August 08, 2014, 09:19 »
+9
I'm not sure what all the doom and gloom is about.

As I've said before, I started contributing in 2006, then I left in 2008, then I returned in 2011.  The reason I left stock altogether is because I had to sell my equipment to help a relative.  I pulled my images because I shut the company down altogether (I treat stock like a business, not a hobby).

With relation to revenue, my revenue has increased over the past 3 years



With relation to sales...they decreased last year, and have increased slightly this year and are on target to exceed all previous years...



The tips.....
diversify your portfolio
diversify your keywording
get out and shoot
have patience

Keep in mind you are shooting for a different market.  Your images are less likely to be used by bloggers, the local mechanic, or smaller companies.  Your images are more likely to be used by larger advertising agencies, textbook buyers, news companies (except CNN who loves Shutterstock), etc.

My revenue isn't as high as some folks on Shutterstock but it's on par with various other agencies.  You also have to keep in mind when comparing to other agencies that this is an unedited collection so people are going to have a lower "per image" return but they are also going to have less time spent editing per image in order to make the image "micro acceptable" (removing logos, replacing the sky to make sure it is blue, etc.).

« Reply #14 on: August 08, 2014, 10:00 »
+1
i joined Alamy from day 1 when they announced their maiden voyage here on MSG...


Really sorry to read this! Just for the record, it wasn't us who -1'd your post :)

The list of photographers we had was a trial brand page that contained links to most of the agencies who sell through us and around 100 of the more well known 'brand' photographers.

Considering we have 37,000+ photographers with images online with us, you can see that the vast majority of contributors were not on the list!

Aside from all that, the page got very little traffic and it no longer exists. Customers find work on Alamy via keyword search, not via any list of photographers.
CheersAlamy

so  you negated the -1  ;)

it is exactly responses like this that makes me reconsider where i should upload my new works when i am having my break during the coming months as winter arrives, and local businesses go into hibernation .
cheers for the prompt reply. gesture goodwill much appreciated

« Reply #15 on: August 08, 2014, 10:05 »
+1


I guess it's just me, then.
« Last Edit: August 08, 2014, 10:26 by stockastic »

« Reply #16 on: August 08, 2014, 10:52 »
+1


I guess it's just me, then.


No, it's not.....I am in a very similar boat as you.

« Reply #17 on: August 08, 2014, 10:58 »
+3
I've never started on Alamy (well, I tried it out at one point), because most of what I read in the forums is people finding their work in European publications, realizing they never got paid for it, and the trouble they seem to have getting the fee.  And the discounts, which seem to result in a few dollars for extensive RM rights.  I don't have the time to deal with that kind of thing.

ShadySue

« Reply #18 on: August 08, 2014, 11:26 »
+1


I guess it's just me, then.


No, it's not.....I am in a very similar boat as you.


Me 3.

ShadySue

« Reply #19 on: August 08, 2014, 11:29 »
0
I've never started on Alamy (well, I tried it out at one point), because most of what I read in the forums is people finding their work in European publications, realizing they never got paid for it, and the trouble they seem to have getting the fee.  And the discounts, which seem to result in a few dollars for extensive RM rights.  I don't have the time to deal with that kind of thing.
True, but the RF model makes it almost impossible to know if a use was paid for or not.
RM sbould be easier to track, but Alamy doesn't care to pursue.

« Reply #20 on: August 08, 2014, 12:01 »
+2
I think it's the same everywhere - the collections are now so big that, while the agency is selling more than ever, it's no longer worthwhile  for a small contributor, unless they happen to own a very specific niche.       

 
« Last Edit: August 08, 2014, 12:08 by stockastic »

« Reply #21 on: August 08, 2014, 16:37 »
0
Yeah, walk around with your camera and point it at stuff and keep clicking, upload 10s of thousands of whatever comes out and some of it will probably find buyers.

Hobostocker

    This user is banned.
« Reply #22 on: August 09, 2014, 02:34 »
0
Yeah, walk around with your camera and point it at stuff and keep clicking, upload 10s of thousands of whatever comes out and some of it will probably find buyers.

Actually it's called Street Photography and there's still demand for it.

dbvirago

« Reply #23 on: August 09, 2014, 08:10 »
+2
I think Alamy is definitely worth the effort. It creates an outlet for images that I can't or don't place anywhere else. I also upload RF there that is not exclusive, but those shots don't sell as well on Alamy.

The only frustrating part for me is the review process and what people on their forum call the 'sin bin.' If one image in a batch of any size is rejected, that entire batch sits for 30 days with a status of 'Awaiting QC.' You can't look at it or determine which image was rejected or why. And a batch is every image uploaded since the last review, even if different batches. I try to scrutinize every image in my Alamy folder before uploading, but obviously miss something occasionally. To circumvent that, I will sometimes just upload 'safe' studio shots, but those don't sell as well there. Makes me nervous about uploading large batches.

Early on I questioned this and was told that the assumption is that if one image has a problem, then it is likely the other images shot at the same time will have the same problem. But, as with my micro agencies, I upload a wide variety of shots from different sessions and times.

But it's their playground and we have to play by their rules.

The good news is that batches that pass usually do so in less than 24 hours. Any batch I upload will pass the next business day.

« Reply #24 on: August 09, 2014, 17:03 »
+4
I've been with these for a long time. Not specialist stuff - just regular hard work over a long time - in fact my port is less than 5k. Slow, gradual growth, culminating in getting an email off them a few months ago for breaking into the top 500 contributors earning wise.

No magic tip from me - but reward for hard work will do...



 

Related Topics

  Subject / Started by Replies Last post
7 Replies
3301 Views
Last post July 28, 2006, 04:29
by fintastique
5 Replies
4547 Views
Last post May 24, 2008, 13:12
by PeterChigmaroff
9 Replies
3491 Views
Last post April 22, 2013, 05:56
by ShadySue
Alamy sales

Started by Phadrea « 1 2 ... 5 6 » Alamy.com

146 Replies
30574 Views
Last post April 21, 2015, 12:25
by jefftakespics2
14 Replies
3299 Views
Last post December 02, 2013, 19:52
by Mantis

Sponsors

Microstock Poll Results