MicrostockGroup Sponsors


Author Topic: How many photos do You submit in one batch?  (Read 3745 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

« on: November 06, 2014, 09:48 »
0
Hi,
how many photos do You submit to ALAMY in one batch?
For now I have 100 % acceptance (new on Alamy) but I know that one bad photo in inspected batch means that entire batch will be rejected.
Do You submit photos from same shooting in one batch?
Or You submit  in batch different photos?

THNXINADVANCE


Buffalo Bill

« Reply #1 on: November 06, 2014, 10:34 »
0
I submit images that have initially passed the Shutterstock review myself. Sort of my internal Quality Control...

« Reply #2 on: November 06, 2014, 10:36 »
+2
Submissions are based on my work flow. I typically submit from one event or one day just due to the way my filing system is set. I pick the best images and work them all up and then submit the batch. This may range from 1 to a dozen or more. I've probably had as high as 50 in the queue over multiple batches. Note that all in the queue get rejected, not just the batch with the reject on that fateful event. So doing a little submission spacing will reduce the chances of having to re-upload a mass of images for a second try. My submission spacing is usually quite sufficient since I start working the next batch when the upload of the current is completed. If Alamy is on the 1 or 2 day inspection cycle I can't keep processing tasks up with them. However over the Christmas break when I spend more time and Alamy slows I can get quite a submission queue loaded.

ShadySue

« Reply #3 on: November 06, 2014, 10:46 »
0
Yup, I'm with Stan. Anything from 1 image to about 20 depending on what I've been shooting and the necessary workflow.

Ed

« Reply #4 on: November 06, 2014, 11:30 »
0
I've submitted from 1 image to over 300 images at a time.  All depends on what I have going on.

Currently have 47 in the queue and I have a few more to keyword then upload but my focus this week is catching up on copyright registrations.

« Reply #5 on: November 06, 2014, 11:40 »
0
Thnx for Your opinions.
Interesting that all batches in queue (also total different themes) will be rejected, not only the batch with bad photo.
Not logical for me.
And yes,  I also submit photos that have initially passed on SS.
We'll see, how will this Alamy story be in future.

« Reply #6 on: November 06, 2014, 11:55 »
0
I do batches of twenty everywhere - find it keeps things manageable

« Reply #7 on: November 06, 2014, 20:43 »
0
20 - 50 or so per batch, with a mix of multiple shoots and concepts.

« Reply #8 on: November 06, 2014, 22:42 »
0
I typically do 10-15 - just seems like a reasonable number

Uncle Pete

« Reply #9 on: November 09, 2014, 19:17 »
0
All of them. Sometimes that's 20-30 sometimes it has been over 200.

Whatever I have from that project, goes.  :)

If someone is not self reviewing and sometimes get rejections, I'd say, keep it small.

I had a couple of images that I wasn't sure of, so I sent them up, by themselves. One at a time.

I can't give you one answer, because it always depends on what and how many. But if I have 200 completed, I send Alamy 200.

« Reply #10 on: November 10, 2014, 03:12 »
+1
It's not how many per batch that matters, it's how many between Alamy reviews since they will reject ALL outstanding batches if one image fails. My last review was four days ago and I've now got about 50 images outstanding in three batches, I'll probably get reviewed again today or tomorrow.  However, if you have a record of rejection you may have to wait a month for the next review - by which time you may have hundreds of images queued.
Really, the only way to limit the damage from rejection is not to get rejected. Once you do, batch size becomes irrelevant, if you limit the number of images between reviews then you will only upload a very small number of images each month. Limiting uploads for fear of rejection makes no sense - just be sure you check each image by pixel-peeping before you send it. These days I process in lightroom, then spend five minutes checking each image in PS before sending.
« Last Edit: November 10, 2014, 07:21 by BaldricksTrousers »

« Reply #11 on: November 10, 2014, 06:50 »
0
It's not how many per batch that matters, it's how many between Alamy reviews since they will reject ALL outstanding batches if one image fails. My last review was four days ago and I've nowt got about 50 images outstanding in three batches, I'll probably get reviewed again today or tomorrow.  However, if you have a record of rejection you may have to wait a month for the next review - by which time you may have hundreds of images queued.
Really, the only way to limit the damage from rejection is not to get rejected. Once you do, batch size becomes irrelevant, if you limit the number of images between reviews then you will only upload a very small number of images each month. Limiting uploads for fear of rejection makes no sense - just be sure you check each image by pixel-peeping before you send it. These days I process in lightroom, then spend five minutes checking each image in PS before sending.

But is it worth so much work (You wrote five minutes just for checking photos), which , I believe, were already accepted and sold on other stock sites as well, agree?
Then so low sales, as our colleagues wrote.
I really do not know if I will upload in future. I am new on Alamy and after 3 ok accepted batches (40-50 photos), was  suddenly rejected a 40 photos batch, because of one photo (with 350+ sales JUST on SS).
Again, this pics control is not logical and not fair too.





« Reply #12 on: November 10, 2014, 07:20 »
0
But is it worth so much work (You wrote five minutes just for checking photos), which , I believe, were already accepted and sold on other stock sites as well, agree?
Then so low sales, as our colleagues wrote.
I really do not know if I will upload in future. I am new on Alamy and after 3 ok accepted batches (40-50 photos), was  suddenly rejected a 40 photos batch, because of one photo (with 350+ sales JUST on SS).
Again, this pics control is not logical and not fair too.
I  upload to Alamy and the other sites at the same time, so the five minutes in PS and probably another five in Lightroom is effort divided between all the sites I submit to. The irritating bit is the final keywording, which takes another couple of minutes per photo - I've got more than 100 waiting for keywording at the moment, which will take a couple of hours of tedium to complete and which might on average produce one sale per year hereafter. Is it worth it? Well, if I was really convinced it was I would be a bit quicker in doing the keywording, wouldn't I? When images are just for Alamy (editorial, generally) the question of whether it is worth it is even more difficult.
I'm surprised that a picture that passed SS went on to fail Alamy.

« Reply #13 on: November 10, 2014, 08:12 »
0

[/quote]
I'm surprised that a picture that passed SS went on to fail Alamy.
[/quote]

Me too. And I am not the first with photo on SS accepted and on Alamy rejected.
You know, this is pic of an object, on white plexy glass with strobe back light.
As good sales on several stock agencies proves, it is a good one.
But for Alamy was Over manipulated ???

This was good from Tror:
"They should fire the responsible person and rework their whole approval process."
 :D

« Reply #14 on: November 10, 2014, 12:34 »
+2
This was good from Tror:
"They should fire the responsible person and rework their whole approval process."
 :D

If everybody got fired if they ever made a judgement call that someone didn't like then I don't suppose there would be very many people in work.
Their approval process is quite clever, really, it's just annoying if it happens to trip you up. I got some film scans rejected four or five years back and then got hit again when I overlooked a sensor spot, so I do know how annoying it is, which is why I am extra careful in my own quality control.


 

Related Topics

  Subject / Started by Replies Last post
3 Replies
2546 Views
Last post June 04, 2011, 08:26
by YayBjorn
5 Replies
4763 Views
Last post August 25, 2011, 03:31
by sobm
0 Replies
3328 Views
Last post September 01, 2011, 11:18
by Morphart
3 Replies
1266 Views
Last post August 30, 2015, 03:23
by kingjon
0 Replies
1494 Views
Last post August 22, 2017, 03:29
by thewurst

Sponsors

Microstock Poll Results