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Author Topic: tip: cheap method to clean DSLR sensor  (Read 12492 times)

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« Reply #25 on: October 21, 2007, 11:04 »
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I haven't taken the lens off my 5d since buying it but I still have dust accumulating on the sensor.

Probably because you're using a zoom lens. Every time you zoom in and out you're pumping air (and dust) in and out of the camera.


« Reply #26 on: October 21, 2007, 13:32 »
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Not so long a go I saw a photographer with some weird little changing bag. It looked like something for handling radioactive waste. He changed his lenses by putting camera and new lens into the bag, zipped it all up, slipped his hands into glove-shaped pockets at the sides of the bag, changed the lens and then unzipped it and took the whole lot out again.

When I have a backpack (almost always...), I try to use it as a cover, exchanging my lenses with it.  Not as techie as the closed bag you saw, but helpful anyway.

Given what you say here, I can't imagine taking my camera to a seriously dusty/sandy environment, like the sand dunes I photographed in Namibia last year!  My P&S survived, though not closing well that lid in front of the lens for a couple of days.  I had sand in and behind my ears for two days after that...

Regards,
Adelaide

« Reply #27 on: October 21, 2007, 15:44 »
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I have one of those  cheap air pumps and it does the trick every time. A friend had something sticky on his sensor few times and the air pump couldn't blow it away , so we bought cleaning swabs and it is a 2 minutes job to clean that. Just make sure you lock the mirror and that your battery is full.

Even if you are using swabs or something similar its recommended to use air pump first , just in case there is something beside the dust (  sand for example) on the sensor that could scratch it.

Find the best position it the house , a room with less dust in the air possible , without carpets  etc ,  bathroom is most often a best place to do it , and NEVER experiment with home made equipment or liquids on your sensor.

Maybe the thing from the start of the topic works , (even if i don't realize how) but I would never try that  on my camera.

« Reply #28 on: October 21, 2007, 22:12 »
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Leaf wrote:
"Either way I like SOFT things to touch my sensor :) "

Me to - i insist of only soft things touching my sensor! lol

Best regards

« Reply #29 on: October 24, 2007, 16:18 »
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I found this article on sensor cleaning that you all might find worthwhile:

http://www.prime-junta.net/pont/How_to/a_Brush_Your_Sensor/a_Brush_Your_Sensor.pdf

« Reply #30 on: October 24, 2007, 16:20 »
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I found this article on sensor cleaning that you all might find worthwhile:

http://www.prime-junta.net/pont/How_to/a_Brush_Your_Sensor/a_Brush_Your_Sensor.pdf


thank you, sir!!  I downloaded it!....  -tom

« Reply #31 on: October 25, 2007, 08:04 »
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Great article, thank you.  I'm waiting for my Canon compact to come home from having it's sensor cleaned.  I'm not up to disassembling a compact myself..not if I want it put back togrther again right.
Rosta

« Reply #32 on: October 25, 2007, 08:27 »
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yeah, very nice article.  thanks for the link

« Reply #33 on: October 25, 2007, 08:33 »
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Great article. It makes a lot of sense, with solidly practical tips.

I'm off to test my brushes ...    :)


 

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