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Author Topic: What do you set your camera at when taking photos?  (Read 5206 times)

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« on: December 24, 2007, 08:57 »
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Just wondering which settings most people use when taking photos, Programable or Manual.
I try to use Manual mode the majority of the time although I get upset if I don't get the settings just right otherwise I leave my camera in programable mode to catch those shots that don't allow you the time for manual.

What are everyone's thoughts on the settings that should be used to capture the perfect shot?


« Reply #1 on: December 24, 2007, 09:44 »
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Always manual, much of the time Aperture Priority.  It gives you more control on what you want to do, or what you want your photo look like.

Claude

gbcimages

« Reply #2 on: December 24, 2007, 10:38 »
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APERTURE

« Reply #3 on: December 24, 2007, 12:52 »
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I shoot products. F.32 @ 2- 4 seconds, using tungsten lights.
Canon 1Ds Mark II.
Canon 90mm Tilt lens.

http://www.featurepics.com/Authors/Images.aspx?id=445.

dbvirago

« Reply #4 on: December 24, 2007, 13:22 »
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Can't argue with results. Nice port, Danny

« Reply #5 on: December 25, 2007, 17:20 »
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In general, aperture.  I normally use aperture priority, and only on occasions I use full manual.  I also set EV compensation - I always find that +1/3 or +2/3 are normally required.

Regards,
Adelaide

« Reply #6 on: December 26, 2007, 08:52 »
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Hey thanks Adelaide,

By the looks of your port I think you have this down pretty well

« Reply #7 on: December 26, 2007, 09:17 »
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Manual for studio.
Aperture priority when I shoot outside.

« Reply #8 on: December 27, 2007, 13:41 »
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aperature priority usually, except manual when flashes are involved.

« Reply #9 on: December 27, 2007, 14:03 »
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It varies s bit.  If I'm shooting non sale photos just for personal use and want to relax while doing it I shoot on Priority.

If I'm shooting with my macro lens or studio shots it's manual all the way including my SB800.  I was having trouble getting the right light for my isolated shots and as soon as I went manual on the flash... boom... perfection!  (That was last night  ;) )

Connie

« Reply #10 on: December 27, 2007, 14:16 »
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Manual for studio.
Aperture priority when I shoot outside.

Same.

« Reply #11 on: December 27, 2007, 15:12 »
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I shoot products. F.32 @ 2- 4 seconds, using tungsten lights.
Canon 1Ds Mark II.
Canon 90mm Tilt lens.

http://www.featurepics.com/Authors/Images.aspx?id=445.



to rimglow:

Very nice gallery. Can I ask more details about your setup and post processing? It seems you have several (I count three, did I count correctly  :) ) softboxes (front and back of the subject), but do you shoot  over a clear plexi glass or do you glue your object top of the stick or similar solutions to help isolation proces? What kind of post processing you do to get "cartoon/hand" drawn feel on your images?

Thanks in advance.

br, Mikko P.

edit: I shoot normally manual mode (125/ F5.6-16 with studio lights). AV-mode and manaul mode when shooting landscapes.
« Last Edit: December 27, 2007, 15:15 by mjp »

« Reply #12 on: December 27, 2007, 18:13 »
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   I built a soft box enclosure around the product, using pvc pipe as a frame, and stretch rip stop nylon over the frame, attaching it with velcro, for easy removal. This is the perfect fabric for diffused lighting, and I've tried them all. Each side of the cage is about 26 inches, but you can cut pvc pipe to any desired length, and it fastens easily together with elbow joints.
   I usually position the brightest light (Tungsten 200 watt) either over head, or behind the cage. Other lights (100 watt) on each side at various distances. I also use a light dimmer on some lights, to control the harshness. Works quite well. I do indeed shoot the subject on plexiglas a lot. That way you can slide different shades of grey, or color, underneath to prevent that harsh black shadow at the bottom.
   Lastly, I am the master of masking, in Photoshop. By isolating the subject on it's own layer, you open up all kinds of possibilities for tweaking the lighting. A lot of my drop shadows are completely fake. Working in Photoshop for the last 12 years has proved very beneficial. Hope this helps!



 

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