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Author Topic: Canva removes me as a contributor...watch your Ps & Qs if you want to stay  (Read 31959 times)

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ShadySue

« Reply #25 on: October 24, 2015, 07:56 »
+16
Uploading new files to an unknown place is a lot of work. To see them deleted even though they sell is bizzare.
Especially when they were deleted without explanation, and despite requests no guidance was given as to what they're looking for.
They must be trying to repel certain buyers, for whatever reason, but without making that clear, what are contributors supposed to do?


« Reply #26 on: October 24, 2015, 08:01 »
+18
Plus, we are all stock buyers. Why annoy us?

Stupidity.

« Reply #27 on: October 24, 2015, 08:29 »
+24
Canva developers are a bunch of unprofessional babies who can't take any criticism.

That's why I only stick to the reliable agencies (SS and FT).

« Reply #28 on: October 24, 2015, 08:38 »
+19
Sorry to hear that, Jo Ann. The agencies (most of them anyway) can simply practice this kind of behavior because their attitude is that for every one of you there are 10 others willing to support them.  But why they would hurt the Canva brand by doing this and knowing it would become public tells me that they don't have very good and tolerant management. They rejected my work which is fine, but I'd not submit there if I could now that we have found another Fotolia, who canned me because I criticized DPC.
« Last Edit: October 24, 2015, 08:45 by Mantis »

« Reply #29 on: October 24, 2015, 08:56 »
+37
In other words, you were one of the first to give a new place a shot, and by uploading your work there you actually gave a new business something to sell. They repaid you for your support by deleting your images without notice, even though they were still selling.

I think these places forget that many of us are not only their suppliers, but their customers, too. And word gets around.

I agree.  I think turning your back on your original supporters does not make for very good community relations.  I think the success they are having with their software may be blinding them to the fact it still needs content to use.  Sorry, JoAnne.

« Reply #30 on: October 24, 2015, 09:27 »
+1
I can say only good words for Canva!

Sorry, JoAnne for what happened! Cases like these for sure are unpleasant for both sides.

« Reply #31 on: October 24, 2015, 09:35 »
+14
Many new contributors use the poll on the right side here to determine what agencies they want to apply to in hopes of selling.  Canva is near the top of the low earners list indicating that they have some sales but don't have the necessary 50 votes to register a rating. They just lost one vote, and who knows how many more when potential contributors don't bother to apply after seeing how JoAnn was unceremoniously dropped. They are in the third spot below the ranked low earners.  Let's see how that changes.

« Reply #32 on: October 24, 2015, 11:28 »
+28
I never in a million years would have thought Guy Kawasaki and Oleg Tscheltzoff in the same context but from what I have read in this thread, Canva seems to be modeling it's management style off the Fotolia legacy. 

If you don't have anything nice to say about Canva, don't say anything at all; or else.

« Reply #33 on: October 24, 2015, 14:13 »
+9
Very suprised and disappointed. What a shame. I thought they were something different.

« Reply #34 on: October 24, 2015, 14:19 »
+12
I thought they were something different.

Nope. Apparently not.

« Reply #35 on: October 24, 2015, 16:09 »
+11
Elenathewise you have been fairly critical of ss and dt lately surely you must have sympathy for jo ann instead and understand where she's coming from

Of course running into such trouble with an agency is not fun. I think Jo Ann knows that I only suggested a possible reason an agency would be unhappy with a contributor's conduct. I don't know the details of Jo Ann's situation and I personally had nothing but pleasant experience dealing with Canva.
The nature of this business though is that we don't owe the agencies anything and they don't really owe anything to us. One of the parties can decide to stop working with the other, for any reason, any time. I know many people who pulled their portfolios from some agencies (I did that to a couple of agencies too), and noone here is saying it's not ok to do and calling these people nasty names.
As to DT and SS - yes I did express unhappiness with declining sales on DT and some SS reviews, however, let's make this clear: it would be ridiculous of me to demand that DT changes their search order so my files would sell better. And if SS decides to use automated reviews (or whatever is the cause of some unreasonable rejections) it's their business and I can only hope they'd improve it. We can not really demand anything from our distribution partners (stock agencies) - we can only try to find some common ground or, if that's not possible, choose not to work with them.
We all sometimes express our frustrations, and it's perfectly understandable, lots of threads here are about that. Venting helps. As long as we're realistic and fair.

« Reply #36 on: October 24, 2015, 16:11 »
+6
In other words, you were one of the first to give a new place a shot, and by uploading your work there you actually gave a new business something to sell. They repaid you for your support by deleting your images without notice, even though they were still selling.

I think these places forget that many of us are not only their suppliers, but their customers, too. And word gets around.

I agree.  I think turning your back on your original supporters does not make for very good community relations.  I think the success they are having with their software may be blinding them to the fact it still needs content to use.  Sorry, JoAnne.

Well said, Sean ( a + wasn't enough)

« Reply #37 on: October 24, 2015, 16:29 »
+31
I had originally heard such good things about Canva.  I was considering uploading there.  I held back after the large numbers of unexplained deletions started.  Seeing how they treat one of their original submitters who help get them off the ground, and who is also a leader of the contributor community makes me certain I will not bother to upload there.

--
admin edit: removed insults
« Last Edit: October 25, 2015, 02:31 by leaf »

« Reply #38 on: October 24, 2015, 17:39 »
+24
Well with this attitude they lost my business with them... they are not a top tier agency and its just not worth uploading or having anything to do with them if we have to live in fear of speaking the truth.

« Reply #39 on: October 24, 2015, 18:33 »
+11
oh ok, so guy kawasaki comes in as investor and evangelist and puts canva in the same line with apple and ebay.

now that the real dollars are in sight, the community is put in its place and the delete buttons are activated. explanations and newsletters no longer necessary.

what a pity, this could have been a great story if they had taken the artists with them on their journey.

if jo ann is not good enough, they have probably teamed up with some image factories.

and who wants internet communities these days anyway, all these public comments and useless discussions, social media is dead anyway, right?

https://designschool.canva.com/blog/guy-kawasaki-chief-evangelist/

beautiful software and elegant apps is all it takes. next stop: ipo


« Reply #40 on: October 24, 2015, 20:06 »
+9
I just received a note from Lee that someone had pointed him to this post and they're closing my Canva account - "You are no longer welcome as a Canva contributor"

So anyone who wants to stay with Canva would do well to take this warning shot and remember to keep your mouth closed in public places about them or their actions.

I seem somehow to have this affect on agencies :)

yes, i remember getting such treatment as a wee child . picture this, and replace me with joanne...

school assembly. "joanne ... please come to the front!"
hush and whispers with fear on the faces of many timid schoolgirls..(gosh, is joanne in trouble???)
"joanne, you have been a bad girl. we do not allow behaviour here in our school.
put out your hands... (slap, slap, slap... director hits joanne with the cane"...
\ thought-bubble of director (... let this be a warning to anyone else who thinks she can be
a smart ar$e saying what 's in her mind".)

assembly bell rings.... joanne walks back to class, no one dares utter a word.
today on, joanne is to be avoided , just to be safe, we should all stay away from joanne.

nasty nasty director... is now one of the top people with Canva.

Hongover

« Reply #41 on: October 24, 2015, 21:19 »
+12
I think it's pretty obvious at what's going on. They are slowly removing contributor content so they don't have to pay contributors.

They got about $7 million in funding in May but the CEO won't disclose how many people are paying. And even if they are, the contributors are getting a nice cut and they can't live with cut. With the growing number of contributor submissions, their server bill is getting massive and that $7 Million isn't going to last very long if they keep hiring people.

« Last Edit: October 24, 2015, 22:21 by Hongover »

« Reply #42 on: October 25, 2015, 02:15 »
+12
I find the buyers also have a right to know how canva handle the contributors because for buyers it is also annoying when images just disappear.

https://wordpress.org/support/view/plugin-reviews/canva

« Reply #43 on: October 25, 2015, 02:44 »
+3
The majority of the posts in this thread have generally been well mannered.  Thank you

Just a reminder for those who are tempted to post otherwise, please keep the tone of the conversation civil (insults and coarse language are not needed)


« Reply #44 on: October 25, 2015, 03:04 »
+5
Wouldn't Canva have a much more civilized option to achieve their goal rather than kicking people/images out of their company?

I'm thinking of implementing a search algorithm that factors together the content quality, initial quality rating and time online to simply let successful older files slowly sink down the search results to be replaced by higher quality content that has been recently approved?

I thought SS kind of has a way to solve this issue.

I remember DT didn't change their algorithm for several years (at the beginning) which meant that successful files from the early days ALWAYS showed up on the top of the search results. Eventually they understood that newer (and better quality) content needs to be presented to customers (also to mix up their search results anyway) and so the former successful sellers slowly sunk down.

« Reply #45 on: October 25, 2015, 03:27 »
+10
I think it's pretty obvious at what's going on. They are slowly removing contributor content so they don't have to pay contributors.

They got about $7 million in funding in May but the CEO won't disclose how many people are paying. And even if they are, the contributors are getting a nice cut and they can't live with cut. With the growing number of contributor submissions, their server bill is getting massive and that $7 Million isn't going to last very long if they keep hiring people.
You've hit the nail on the head I think. They needed content to start the site up now they can generate their own. They just need enough for a "good enough" selection. They aren't  a stock site. A very cynical way to go about it or treat people but makes sense from their side I guess.

« Reply #46 on: October 25, 2015, 03:32 »
0
Wouldn't Canva have a much more civilized option to achieve their goal rather than kicking people/images out of their company?

I'm thinking of implementing a search algorithm that factors together the content quality, initial quality rating and time online to simply let successful older files slowly sink down the search results to be replaced by higher quality content that has been recently approved?

I thought SS kind of has a way to solve this issue.

I remember DT didn't change their algorithm for several years (at the beginning) which meant that successful files from the early days ALWAYS showed up on the top of the search results. Eventually they understood that newer (and better quality) content needs to be presented to customers (also to mix up their search results anyway) and so the former successful sellers slowly sunk down.
If they do different way then that was not their purpose. Please see the comment below yours, the next one.

« Reply #47 on: October 25, 2015, 06:25 »
+21
I am just wondering: where are you Lee?

« Reply #48 on: October 25, 2015, 11:33 »
+18
I am just wondering: where are you Lee?
Must be busy deleting files.
I'm so glad I didn't apply. Sorry for the ones having bad experiences with Canva.

« Reply #49 on: October 25, 2015, 11:51 »
+8
I am just wondering: where are you Lee?

must be under the cone of silence...


 

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