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Author Topic: Looking for a new backup system (raid1?)  (Read 4173 times)

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« on: October 29, 2013, 07:28 »
0
Ok, well im looking to get a new system in place to backup my photos and get them all arranged as my files are spread across 2 hard drives, if one fails i loose half my shots since i started photography 5 years ago, if we get robbed or the house burns down i loose the lot!

i've been looking into a raid 1 setup for home and then using my current externals to keep at a friends or relatives house incase we get robbed etc...

i only need 3 tb of storage so ill be looking at a 6tb raid1 so 3tb on each drive as they are mirrored.

what could you recomend for around the 300 - 400 (gbp) mark, i dont mind spending a little more if it means i get exactly what i want...

i've noticed that western digital do one for about 290 but anything after that and it seems your looking at the 'big boy stuff'

Ps my computer knowledge isnt the best so dont want anything over complicated ;)

Basically it seems like its going to be something like http://www.amazon.co.uk/Personal-Storage-Mirroring-Western-Digital/dp/B006TD68GM/ref=sr_1_2?s=computers&ie=UTF8&qid=1383049210&sr=1-2&keywords=raid+1#productDetails

or the more expensive option of  http://www.overclockers.co.uk/showproduct.php?prodid=HD-058-SY&groupid=1657&catid=2400
« Last Edit: October 29, 2013, 07:33 by phildaint »


stockphotoeurope

« Reply #1 on: October 29, 2013, 08:32 »
0
I agree that Raid 1 is the right solution for a small raid system.

This (see attached picture) is my configuration, with a Netgear ReadyNas Duo and 2 x 3TB Seagate drives.

For a little less than 400 - including a gigabit switch (important for transfer speed if your router is only 100Mbit) - I am quite happy with it.

The Synology nas in your link looks like a good system too.
« Last Edit: October 29, 2013, 08:41 by stockphotoeurope »

« Reply #2 on: October 29, 2013, 14:24 »
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You might consider a cloud backup service.  I'm using LiveDrive who are based in the UK.  Excellent service.  Since joining them I haven't had to worry about doing my own backups.

« Reply #3 on: October 29, 2013, 16:17 »
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+1 cloud backup.

Ed

« Reply #4 on: October 29, 2013, 18:47 »
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I use a Drobo for my still and video files incorporated with a library in Lightroom and I have a RAID system built into the computer.

Drobo is not for everyone as it has a proprietary system so you can't just slap the drive into another computer should you decide to do that.  It doesn't bother me because I bought the system with 2 tb drives included for $250 used.  Haven't had a single issue in the past year and I have two more bays available for expansion.

I also upload images to Photoshelter for backup.

« Reply #5 on: October 29, 2013, 20:09 »
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A friend of mine highly recomended the synology one to me, though insisting i go for the 8tb (2 x 4tb) to give me that extra bit of time before i have to start looking at more drives or something with more bays as he knows how much i go out photographing

Been watching a few reviews on the synology on youtube and think when payday (from my day job) comes tomorow ill be blowing a big chunk on one of these as it seems to tick all the boxes http://www.overclockers.co.uk/showproduct.php?prodid=HD-050-SY


Ed

« Reply #6 on: October 29, 2013, 20:49 »
0
Been watching a few reviews on the synology on youtube and think when payday (from my day job) comes tomorow ill be blowing a big chunk on one of these as it seems to tick all the boxes http://www.overclockers.co.uk/showproduct.php?prodid=HD-050-SY


Taking a look at the advertisement, it looks similar to what you buy with the Drobo I mentioned - you get the bare bones case and the software to manage it.  The kit does not include the hard drives you need and it may not come with the 512mb memory advertised as being capable for use in the device (these items aren't mentioned in the package content listing at the bottom of the description).  Before you place the order, you may want to call to be sure you know what you are getting.

« Reply #7 on: October 30, 2013, 01:22 »
0
Similar to Drobo, you should also check out a Qnap drive.  I have a couple of these and have been very happy with them.

Beppe Grillo

« Reply #8 on: October 30, 2013, 08:59 »
0
Well, the cloud is a good solution, but no so secure you know, NSA can access to your files
Some very good and secure alternative can be:
Transporter
http://www.filetransporter.com/learn-more/
Lima
http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/cloud-guys/plug-the-brain-of-your-devices

« Reply #9 on: October 31, 2013, 16:59 »
0
By all means have a good backup routine, redundant copies and offsite storage.  Why . would anyone need RAID for storing photos?

« Reply #10 on: October 31, 2013, 17:44 »
+1
By all means have a good backup routine, redundant copies and offsite storage.  Why . would anyone need RAID for storing photos?

I use RAID 1 hard drives for storing my images just because it is a good backup routine and redundant copies. Now all I have to worry about is offsite storage. I use my Symbiostock website hosting account for that. So far, it has worked out great: I just survived a hard disk failure a couple weeks ago without any data loss at all. I simply bought a new hard disk, replaced the failed one and within a few hours the RAID had restored itself. IMHO RAID works much better than the best backup routine that I usually forget to follow  ;)

Ed

« Reply #11 on: October 31, 2013, 20:11 »
0
By all means have a good backup routine, redundant copies and offsite storage.  Why . would anyone need RAID for storing photos?

Because when you are working on your computer, and you get a window that pops up and tells you that a hard drive has failed, it is much more desired than having the whole computer crash and not being able to retrieve any of the data or programs that were stored on that hard drive.

On my last computer, this happened 4 times before I had to replace it.  I haven't had it happen on my current computer (yet) - but it will happen eventually.

Another point - not all online "backup systems" accept all file formats.  With a removeable hard drive RAID system, you can physically store a copied hard drive off-site (RAID allows for this).

« Reply #12 on: October 31, 2013, 20:53 »
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Finally bit the bullet today and bought a synology ds213+ and 2 x 4tb drives, its still varying disks/ parity consistency checks which should be done by the morning.

It may take me a few weeks to get myself all sorted on it as there are quite a few shoots i haven't even touched! and just need to get it all organised. then i can have peace of mind when i take the other externals offsite!

I like how i can even access my files from where i will store my offsite backup too aslong as the nas is conencted to the internet, and can even dump files onto it when im on holiday !  8)

« Reply #13 on: October 31, 2013, 21:03 »
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8 TB = 8388608 MB / D800 RAW (50MB) = 167772 files ;D

ain't that a little too much?

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« Reply #14 on: November 01, 2013, 05:03 »
+2
I'm been in the IT industry for decades, and I would never get a RAID system for personal use for the simple reason that if the controller board fails then you will probably lose everything on the drives.  RAID is useless without a controller board and finding one that exactly matches the system that you have is almost impossible.  While having a controller board fail is not too likely, I still wouldn't want to take the risk.

RAID systems are also usually more expensive.

I would much rather just buy two drives and synchronize them with cheap software (such as SyncBack, etc).  Basically, everything that you save on one drive will then get copied to another drive.  If you lose one drive, you just buy another one and copy the files from the other drive and start the synchronization process all over again.

« Reply #15 on: November 01, 2013, 05:14 »
0
People running Windows at this time need to be concerned about the cryptolocker ransomware virus which also has the potential to lock you out of your online and locally networked backups. Non networked generational backups are crucial.

« Reply #16 on: November 01, 2013, 05:25 »
+2
I'm been in the IT industry for decades, and I would never get a RAID system for personal use for the simple reason that if the controller board fails then you will probably lose everything on the drives.  RAID is useless without a controller board and finding one that exactly matches the system that you have is almost impossible.  While having a controller board fail is not too likely, I still wouldn't want to take the risk.

RAID systems are also usually more expensive.

I would much rather just buy two drives and synchronize them with cheap software (such as SyncBack, etc).  Basically, everything that you save on one drive will then get copied to another drive.  If you lose one drive, you just buy another one and copy the files from the other drive and start the synchronization process all over again.

Not so at all.  With RAID 1, the drives are mirrored, and if the RAID controller fails you can always just mount one of the drives in another PC or external caddy and it will read it just fine.

At least, that's my experience.  Perhaps other RAID controllers operate differently, but that's always worked for me.  Besides, I've never yet had a controller card fail;  the disk is the most vulnerable item.

« Reply #17 on: November 01, 2013, 06:19 »
0
I'm been in the IT industry for decades, and I would never get a RAID system for personal use for the simple reason that if the controller board fails then you will probably lose everything on the drives.  RAID is useless without a controller board and finding one that exactly matches the system that you have is almost impossible.  While having a controller board fail is not too likely, I still wouldn't want to take the risk.

RAID systems are also usually more expensive.

I would much rather just buy two drives and synchronize them with cheap software (such as SyncBack, etc).  Basically, everything that you save on one drive will then get copied to another drive.  If you lose one drive, you just buy another one and copy the files from the other drive and start the synchronization process all over again.

Not so at all.  With RAID 1, the drives are mirrored, and if the RAID controller fails you can always just mount one of the drives in another PC or external caddy and it will read it just fine.

At least, that's my experience.  Perhaps other RAID controllers operate differently, but that's always worked for me.  Besides, I've never yet had a controller card fail;  the disk is the most vulnerable item.

Exactly. I've been WD My Book Duo's (set to RAID 1) for years and have yet to have any issues. I store virtually nothing of value of my PC's HD other than the OS and programme files.

I like the look of LiveDrive, as suggested earlier by Hatman, for off-site storage. Cloud storage was previously a bit too expensive in the volumes I require but costs appear to have come a lot (and broadband speeds have increased too which also makes it more practical).

« Reply #18 on: November 01, 2013, 07:43 »
+1
If you have a RAID or similar mirroring system alone and there is a power surge or a strike you can potentially lose both drives simultaneously. Not just the controller. Do not rely on domestic surge protectors.

Also - batches of drives with problems very often fail in batches. So if your RAID system contains two identical drives from the same batch there may be a great [EDIT: I mean greater] chance of them failing than two drives from different makers or made at different times.

If backup matters you definitely need another swapped out copy.
« Last Edit: November 01, 2013, 14:55 by bhr »

« Reply #19 on: November 01, 2013, 11:04 »
+1
... Besides, I've never yet had a controller card fail;  the disk is the most vulnerable item.


I am a a soon-to-be-ex Drobo owner. My experience with this has not been happy. I went with this (expensive) option to guard against drive failures. I have had zero drive failures but multiple Drobo failures. They are sensitive little flowers and if you get lucky and nothing on it fails, yea. You can read [ur=http://scottkelby.com/2012/im-done-with-drobo/]many unhappy experiences here[/url] if you think it's just me.

I've never lost any data (because of a combination of luck and many copies of important data), but I will be continuing to use a RAID system along with on the shelf external disks for an archive and Backblaze for offsite safety net. Three copies of everything is the goal.


 

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