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Author Topic: Video Settings When Saving Stock Footage to Submit  (Read 21244 times)

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« on: November 01, 2010, 07:51 »
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I can't believe this hasn't been discussed already but perhaps only as off topic discussion in other threads.  

so anyhow, what settings do you use to save your video?

I am shooting with a 5D mark II and was just going to try and submit a few videos again and just like every time I have to re-figure out what settings to use.  So anyhow, I think this is what I 'usually' use.  Next time hopefully I'll just remember to look at this thread.

The 5D Mark II shoots 1080p, so progressive.

Format - Quick Time
Video Codec - Photo - JPG
Quality - 95
Audio - None

I always wondered what the difference between photo-jpg and Motion JPEG-A or Motion JPEG-B.  apparently the later two are for interlaced video according to the iStock video manual.


« Reply #1 on: November 01, 2010, 08:18 »
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I think it's worth to add that in case you don't do much video editing and don't have software capable of creating quicktime movies you can use freeware video converter MPEG streamclip (http://www.squared5.com)

« Reply #2 on: November 01, 2010, 08:41 »
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The stock-video sites I submit to take my 7d (same as 5dmll basically - h.264 1080p)  clips just as they are out of camera. I dont alter anything but the sound, I often strip the sound, I use quicktime pro to export the h.264 7d clips without soundnbut leave the codec as h264.   Thats on pond5 and canstock

« Reply #3 on: November 01, 2010, 09:21 »
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I save my settings in premiere elements, on the train now, so can't access it.  Still confused about frame rate.  I started with 30fps but switched to 25fps for the European PAL market but some people on Pond5 that have been doing this longer than me say 30fps is better.  There are lots of threads in forums about frame rates and I'm still not sure what would be best for me to use.

« Reply #4 on: November 01, 2010, 09:35 »
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It is MUCH easier to down-convert 30p to 25p than it is to up-convert 25p to 30p.  And 30p is much more desirable in the U.S. market (which is where most sales occur from my own research).

I am a proponent of "the more data the better", so I export my camera footage as PhotoJPEG at 95%.  I have some friends that do 90%, but in cases of extreme motion or LOTS and LOTS of colors, I can see a difference between 90% and 95%, so I just render everything at 95%.

For animation, I render as PhotoJPEG at 85%.  I learned not to use motion blur in my animations (requests from some studios that have directly bought from me) and I don't use complex shaders or textures, so 85% works very well.  For Pond5, CanStock and RevoStock I render out animations with embedded alpha using PNG.

If ShutterStock and a couple other sites supported H.264, I would switch from PhotoJPEG to H.264, but it's not worth rendering twice just to upload H.264 to the few sites that do support it.

« Reply #5 on: November 01, 2010, 09:43 »
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thanks for the reply dnavarrojr

One thing that always confuses me is 30 fps compared to 29.97 fps.  Sometimes people actually mean 29.97 fps when they say 30fps and other times 30 fps is actually 30 fps. 

The 5d Mark II shot at an actual 30fps until a recent upgrade (I believe) and now it shoots at 29.97 fps ... or am I mistaken.

« Reply #6 on: November 01, 2010, 11:22 »
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thanks for the reply dnavarrojr

One thing that always confuses me is 30 fps compared to 29.97 fps.  Sometimes people actually mean 29.97 fps when they say 30fps and other times 30 fps is actually 30 fps. 

The 5d Mark II shot at an actual 30fps until a recent upgrade (I believe) and now it shoots at 29.97 fps ... or am I mistaken.

I'm under the impression that 24 or 30 fps are 23.976 or 29.97 fps respectively when going into broadcasting. Originally 30fps were used in the old black and white days. Once color came into the game they "slowed" it down to 29.97.

Plenty of resources online about that stuff

« Reply #7 on: November 01, 2010, 13:44 »
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thanks for the reply dnavarrojr

One thing that always confuses me is 30 fps compared to 29.97 fps.  Sometimes people actually mean 29.97 fps when they say 30fps and other times 30 fps is actually 30 fps. 

The 5d Mark II shot at an actual 30fps until a recent upgrade (I believe) and now it shoots at 29.97 fps ... or am I mistaken.

30p = 29.97 fps
25p = 25 fps
24p = 23.976 fps

In any case, I shoot my video at 30p or 29.97 fps and render/upload clips at that frame rate.  Down-conversion to 25p or 24p with modern tools is fairly straight-forward.  Up-converting 25p to 30p can be done, but it doesn't quite look the same.  In any case, I would never personally upload a clip at a frame-rate other than what I natively shot it.  And my own personal experience is that doing conversion myself isn't necessary.  Either the site I upload handles it automatically (ShutterStock and iStock for example) or the buyer can do it.  I haven't run into a situation yet (as far as I know) where a buyer didn't buy my clip solely because it wasn't downloadable at a different frame rate or lower resolution.  And actually, if a buyer contacts Pond5, they will do conversions of purchased clips for free.

There are people who will do conversions of different frame rates and sizes then upload all of those to Pond5, but I find it a waste of time.  I'd rather spend my time creating new content than rehashing content into 5 or 6 clips.

jbarber873

« Reply #8 on: November 01, 2010, 17:30 »
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 Leaf- I use final cut to output, with the same settings as you suggest. I had the same problem of forgetting my settings, but i realized that you can save them as a preset, which I would think you can do in most programs. The motion jpeg a or b thing was explained to me as just an older and newer version of the same thing. This may or may not be correct. One of the biggest things I've noticed in digital video is that if you ask a question you will get many different answers, even from that same source. At one time or another I have had 3 different settings recommended to me from istock, all from the "help desk".

« Reply #9 on: November 01, 2010, 20:12 »
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Well to put it short and what works for me is:

- MOV container format
- PhotoJPG for animations
- MotionJPG for filmed clips
- 95% quality
- Full HD 30fps

« Reply #10 on: November 04, 2010, 04:41 »
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Well to put it short and what works for me is:

- MOV container format
- PhotoJPG for animations
- MotionJPG for filmed clips
- 95% quality
- Full HD 30fps

I wouldn't use MotionJPG for non-interlaced footage.  And if I owned a camera that shoots interlaced, I would NOT de-interlace it myself.  I'd upload it interlaced.

« Reply #11 on: December 12, 2010, 04:22 »
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Use motionjpeg for interlaced and photojpeg for progressive. Yep. There is some debate about the compression settings. At some point, probably well before 95 percent, you begin to just create larger and redundant (in terms of information presented frame to frame). You may find the page I have created about it useful at: http://www.stockvideoseller.com/public_html/topics/3-the-universal-formats-wha.html
« Last Edit: December 12, 2010, 04:28 by tbmpvideo »

jbarber873

« Reply #12 on: December 12, 2010, 10:39 »
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Use motionjpeg for interlaced and photojpeg for progressive. Yep. There is some debate about the compression settings. At some point, probably well before 95 percent, you begin to just create larger and redundant (in terms of information presented frame to frame). You may find the page I have created about it useful at: http://www.stockvideoseller.com/public_html/topics/3-the-universal-formats-wha.html


Your link is right on the money! I wish i had seen it when I started doing video. Thanks!

« Reply #13 on: December 12, 2010, 12:23 »
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How do I know if my camera records interlanced or not? 

« Reply #14 on: December 12, 2010, 13:12 »
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How do I know if my camera records interlanced or not? 
Look in you manual or post the model here.

« Reply #15 on: December 12, 2010, 13:15 »
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Use motionjpeg for interlaced and photojpeg for progressive. Yep. There is some debate about the compression settings. At some point, probably well before 95 percent, you begin to just create larger and redundant (in terms of information presented frame to frame). You may find the page I have created about it useful at: http://www.stockvideoseller.com/public_html/topics/3-the-universal-formats-wha.html


I was going to ask if there were any good sites for beginners, thanks for the link I will read up this week. 

Any other sites you guys can refer?

« Reply #16 on: December 12, 2010, 13:56 »
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How do I know if my camera records interlanced or not? 
Look in you manual or post the model here.
Geez, where is the manual after so many years?  ;D

It's a Canon Powershot A620 (not meant for stock though).

« Reply #17 on: December 12, 2010, 14:26 »
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How do I know if my camera records interlanced or not? 

Look in you manual or post the model here.

Geez, where is the manual after so many years?  ;D

It's a Canon Powershot A620 (not meant for stock though).

Let me Google it for you:
http://www.retrevo.com/search/v2/jsp/mytrevo/myTrevo.jsp?page=man

or just download the manual from other sites.

My guess is that it records progressive. But just get the manual.

« Reply #18 on: December 13, 2010, 03:49 »
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I was going to ask if there were any good sites for beginners, thanks for the link I will read up this week. 

Any other sites you guys can refer?


I tried to list all the links I could find on the links page. There's not a lot out there in one place (for video). Lots of blogs but you'll need to dig through them. I tried and will try to put everything you might need starting out, in terms of strategy and practical application, in one place. Let me know what else you need. Interested to find out.

RacePhoto

« Reply #19 on: December 28, 2010, 21:17 »
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How do I know if my camera records interlanced or not? 
Look in you manual or post the model here.
Geez, where is the manual after so many years?  ;D

It's a Canon Powershot A620 (not meant for stock though).

Interesting thread even though I don't shoot video except with the P&S cameras. They take nice clips for the web and fun. Pretty much like this (A620 specs.) I thought I took a 14 minute clip with the A590IS, but maybe it was at 320? Yes, Not For Stock.

Movies are saved in AVI format, using the M-JPEG codec, video at 640 x 480 (30 frames/second) with sound until either your memory card is full or the file size reaches 1GB. (eight minutes) The My Colors and Photo Effects features work in movie mode.

« Reply #20 on: January 18, 2012, 08:10 »
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Reviving an old thread with new question:

My 5D shoots h264 codec but I often export the trimmed clips as photo - jpeg codec to suit istock's no h264 rule.  I can't see a quality difference between the two.  The question is which codec do buyers prefer? 


 

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