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Author Topic: ID requested?  (Read 13587 times)

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« on: February 21, 2008, 23:30 »
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Guess i haven't requested a payout from fotolia in a while... when i go to their convert credits page it tells me to upload my id? And before i transferred funds without any of this. What did I miss? Is it a new policy?


« Reply #1 on: February 21, 2008, 23:36 »
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I guess our Social Security numbers are not enough anymore.  ::)

jsnover

« Reply #2 on: February 22, 2008, 11:43 »
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I sent something to support this morning as I got the ID request as well.

I won't do this - I've given them my social security number. I've received tax statements from them. As far as i can see this is adequate identification for the IRS and it should be adequate for Fotolia

I've been a contributor there for over 2 years. I can't imagine what legitimate need they have for anything beyond my tax ID.

Dreamstime backed off when they talked about doing something like this a while ago. I'm hoping this was just a software glitch at Fotolia, but if not, I'll delete my account before I give them scans of my passport or driver's license.

I haven't yet heard back from support, so we'll see what they say.

jsnover

« Reply #3 on: February 22, 2008, 14:50 »
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I've received a couple of replies from support - they insist I upload my ID and I won't.

Chad if you're out there, please step in and help. I don't want my relationship with Fotolia to end because they're collecting unnecessary sensitive data beyond the tax ID (SSN) that I've already provided.

On top of which they're holding my payment hostage. They have no right to do that as I'm complying with all the terms I signed up to. They've changed the rules and at the least I have a right to my money before I walk away.

« Reply #4 on: February 22, 2008, 15:10 »
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Jsnover, I'll be watching this thread to see if you make any headway.  I noticed the new ID requirement last week when I requested a payment but wanted my money so just gave in.  I have to admit, it makes me feel a bit helpless when sites change their terms, offer big sales that make us less commissions or hold our payments hostage.  What to do... what to do.  Good luck to you.

« Reply #5 on: February 22, 2008, 15:58 »
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I'm sorry ladies but I have to disagree. If I remember well, 123RF asked an ID even for joining. With so much phishing and fraud going around on the Net, it's very cautious to do so. I think Fotolia and Dreamstime are well-established companies, and it's very safe to upload an ID. I would never do it to a starting site.

jsnover

« Reply #6 on: February 22, 2008, 16:05 »
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123rf asked me to sign a (paper) contract with Inmagine, which I did. I have not uploaded ID anywhere.

How does uploading my passport scan prevent fraud? If I'm a scam artist, then I upload a fake passport to go with my fake/stolen images. Otherwise the name, address, phone number and social security  number should do it.

What Phishing or fraud on a contributor's part are they addressing with this requirement?

« Reply #7 on: February 22, 2008, 16:23 »
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I have to admit, it makes me feel a bit helpless when sites change their terms, offer big sales that make us less commissions or hold our payments hostage.  What to do... what to do.  Good luck to you.

So true.

However, as JoAnn said in another thread, we aren't helpless.

I will join her in saying I won't upload ID. What FT are asking for is no less than an Identity Theft kit. How do we know this information will be stored securely? We have seen enough fiascos from various sites to know that we can't trust them. I don't want to name names here, I'm sure we can all remember some of the things that have happened.

What to do...what to do. That's exactly how I feel. Between a rock and hard place!

Linda


jsnover

« Reply #8 on: February 22, 2008, 16:28 »
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Deleted...
« Last Edit: February 26, 2008, 15:08 by jsnover »

« Reply #9 on: February 22, 2008, 16:39 »
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What Phishing or fraud on a contributor's part are they addressing with this requirement?
Somebody that hacked your Paypall email won't probably know your address. If he does... of course he can always Photoshop an ID. That's why basically scanned MRFs and IDs are useless. Anybody can easily fake a scan in PS. If you have over 1-2000$ on an account, it's worthwhile. For 100$, they won't do it, so in these cases, an ID might still be a good idea.

« Reply #10 on: February 22, 2008, 16:54 »
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When I joined 123RF, I wasn't asked an ID, this happened much later. 

I don't mind sending a copy of my passport to a well-known agency. I would it if was a new one.

In any case, as I believe it was suggested here a while ago, I add a watermark saying that lousy poorly lit photo of my passport is for site A use only.  Ok, watermakrs can be cloned out.

Regards,
Adelaide


jsnover

« Reply #11 on: February 22, 2008, 20:26 »
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deleted...
« Last Edit: February 26, 2008, 15:07 by jsnover »

jsnover

« Reply #12 on: February 25, 2008, 18:20 »
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Deleted...
« Last Edit: February 26, 2008, 15:07 by jsnover »

« Reply #13 on: February 26, 2008, 14:16 »
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Chad from Fotolia.com has responded on another microstock forum about this issue.  Here is his response:

"Hello Everyone,
 
I have been reading your comments about our recent increased security measures and I wish to address this issue with you today.
 
As you know Fotolia has grown into a large international business. We deal with millions of transactions each month. Many of the world's top advertising and design agencies come to Fotolia for their image needs. These companies place their trust in us to provide high-quality, legal content.
 
It is our desire to continue to build this trust with our buyers, which will of course benefit our contributors. One way of doing this is to truly know who we are doing business with. We unfortunately do not have the luxury of face to face relationships. Providing a photo ID helps us verify your information and helps us build trust in our suppliers.
 
Of course, there are very real concerns over the possibility of identity theft. To clarify, the scanned copies of our contributor identifications are stored in a secure database, accessible by only a select few of Fotolia employees for use in confirming identification for security purposes, much like a bank or HR department. This information is not stored on your public profiles and will not be used for anything other than identity verification.
 
Tax id numbers are required for US members who earn over $600 in one year this is the law and it will not change. The Photo ID requirement is a global requirement and is completely unrelated to the Tax id.
We feel it is our duty to protect our members' identities, images, and credits. We feel this additional information will help us to defend against suspicious activities that have been rumored at other companies within our industry. We need to know who we are doing business with and we feel adding the increased security measures of a photo ID not only protect us and our buyers but it will also protect you. This requirement is not new to the industry and has become common practice at other agencies.
 
To those who supplied false or altered government IDs to Fotolia - this is a clear violation of state and Federal laws. Providing a false or altered government ID for the purpose of monetary gain is considered fraud. We urge you to consider and think of the serious consequences you face for this illegal behavior, as Fotolia will report illegal activities to the appropriate authorities.
 
I hope this gives you some additional information about our recent changes, but this requirement will not change.
 
Chad Bridwell
Director of US Operations
Fotolia.com"

« Reply #14 on: February 26, 2008, 15:11 »
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Fraud????

I wonder if state and Federal laws allow them to keep our money, if we refuse to submit to this unannounced change in the contract?

Well, no worries. We've never succeeded in uploading the right stuff to Fotolia, so if we delete our portfolio it won't be a big loss,  to them or us.

Linda

jsnover

« Reply #15 on: February 26, 2008, 15:12 »
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I replied on the other forum. To summarize: They didn't address the fundamental issue that if they don't see the person and the real ID at some point, the scan gives them nothing to help with "buyer trust'.

As far as the threat on altered ID, how would they know what's altered or not as they have no ID to look at?

I asked them to consider an alternative - like a signed contract - so this isn't just holding a gun to our head via a refusal to pay money owed after over 2 years of an established relationship.

I fully expect to have to leave Fotolia over this, but I will fight tooth and nail to get my money - they have no right to withhold it.

« Reply #16 on: February 26, 2008, 15:49 »
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PayPal has already "authorized" most of us, so I'm not sure why they feel like they need to as well.

« Reply #17 on: February 26, 2008, 17:23 »
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As far as the threat on altered ID, how would they know what's altered or not as they have no ID to look at?

Of course they can't do anything unless by chance they discover the fraud.

I guess this is the same like in any fake document. If you use a fake passport and no immigration officer notices it, you can travel around the globe.  What doesn't mean that what you do is not illegal, nor that you can suffer the consequences in case you are caught.  And the airline is not responsible for checking you in with a fake passport.

If a minor goes to a liquor store and has a fake ID, unless it's very obvious, is it illegal that they sell to him?  I think they can only be held responsible if they don't request a document.  This is probably what happens in FT, maybe some of the countries they operate with require their having an ID for finance operations, in order to avoid money laundry (like MB recently stated for requiring a proof of address).

Regards,
Adelaide

jsnover

« Reply #18 on: March 03, 2008, 19:44 »
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I did get paid this morning (as did one other contributor who'd uploaded an ID with sensitive data blacked out). I don't know what this means as there's been no further communication. Chad did say that my idea about getting a notarized statement - where the notary would then see you and the ID, giving some assurance that you were who you said you were - wasn't acceptable for Fotolia.

I keep checking to see if they've closed my account, but so far, I'm OK.

« Reply #19 on: March 03, 2008, 22:49 »
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I did get paid this morning (as did one other contributor who'd uploaded an ID with sensitive data blacked out). I don't know what this means as there's been no further communication. Chad did say that my idea about getting a notarized statement - where the notary would then see you and the ID, giving some assurance that you were who you said you were - wasn't acceptable for Fotolia.

I keep checking to see if they've closed my account, but so far, I'm OK.

Glad you got paid and that you haven't been ousted. I requested a payout about 5 days ago and was annoyed to see the request for ID. I reluctantly uploaded a scan of my drivers license, but with the license and card numbers whited out, as I did when I joined 123RF. I haven't heard anything, so I'm supposing that means that this is acceptable. I certainly don't believe they need that information, just the photo ID and address confirmation should be more than enough. I was interested that you said another contributor had hidden sensitive data from their ID. Did they have trouble with that? I really do agree with you that it is wrong to withhold payment from long standing contributors in this way.

jsnover

« Reply #20 on: March 03, 2008, 23:52 »
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I was interested that you said another contributor had hidden sensitive data from their ID. Did they have trouble with that?

The other contributor (who blacked out sensitive data on their ID) got paid today too, so they assumed that what they had uploaded was adequate.

« Reply #21 on: March 04, 2008, 10:20 »
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PayPal has already "authorized" most of us, so I'm not sure why they feel like they need to as well.

Excellent point!  Never even thought about that. 

« Reply #22 on: March 04, 2008, 16:28 »
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PayPal has already "authorized" most of us, so I'm not sure why they feel like they need to as well.
Excellent point!  Never even thought about that. 

Different country rules?  Remember MB asked a proof of residence due to UK anti-money laundry laws (at least so they claimed). 

Regards,
Adelaide

helix7

« Reply #23 on: March 05, 2008, 14:25 »
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Last time I signed on for a full-time job, I had to submit a photo ID and Social Security card. I think it's part of the US W-2 form.

I consider Fotolia to be one of my employers, so why not submit the same info to them?


jsnover

« Reply #24 on: March 05, 2008, 14:55 »
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As someone elsewhere pointed out, we are not Fotolia's employees (and they'd be equally adamant about that as all sorts of legal obligations would come with being our employers).

We are suppliers - like the folks who ship pickles to Wal-Mart. Suppliers are not routinely asked to provide ID to the companies they do business with. US employers are required to check that their employees are who they say they are and have a right to work in the US (I used to have to show my green card before I became a US citizen).

Fotolia has my SSN (in spite of my concerns about their initial request coming when they didn't have a secure upload process.

Keeping sensitive (data valuable to identity theives) secure is an important issue. This isn't about fiddling taxes or hiding who we are - Fotolia has already sent me 1099 reports of income which also go to the IRS. All they need for that are my SSN and address.

digiology

« Reply #25 on: March 05, 2008, 15:55 »
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jsnover - If you don't mind me asking. What did you do for 123RF? I see they ask for ID before payout also.

jsnover

« Reply #26 on: March 05, 2008, 20:00 »
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I don't mind at all. I have never uploaded ID to 123rf  - I assume it wasn't needed because I signed up with them right when they started and had to sign a contract with Inmagine. They keep paying me, so that's fine with me :)

I've never been asked to upload ID anywhere, before Fotolia, although all the sites have my Social Security Number.

I think the best avenue for dealing with this - if the sites aren't going to see reason and continue to insist upon upload of unverifiable ID scans - is the scan with blacked out sensitive information. One's birthdate, driver's license number, passport number and SSN are all information helpful to an identity thief. My address isn't sensitive as I'm in the phone book with a listed number, so that's already public.

Fotolia has aparently accepted some scans with blacked out sections, so perhaps 123rf would do the same?

« Reply #27 on: March 17, 2008, 00:47 »
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Fotolia has aparently accepted some scans with blacked out sections, so perhaps 123rf would do the same?

Yes, i got my payout from Fotolia after uploading my ID with some numbers obscured. 123rf actually invite you to upload your ID with sensitive data blacked out if you wish.


 

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