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Author Topic: Two word keywords - are they allowed?  (Read 2812 times)

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« on: December 13, 2018, 15:06 »
0
Take a Red admiral butterfly. Should it be keyworded as "Red, admiral, butterfly, Vanessa, atalanta" or "Red admiral, butterfly, Vanessa atalanta"?  Obviously, someone searching for an admiral (or a Vanessa) doesn't want an insect, but all the keyword examples I see are for stand-alone words.


« Reply #1 on: December 13, 2018, 17:05 »
+1
Take a Red admiral butterfly. Should it be keyworded as "Red, admiral, butterfly, Vanessa, atalanta" or "Red admiral, butterfly, Vanessa atalanta"?  Obviously, someone searching for an admiral (or a Vanessa) doesn't want an insect, but all the keyword examples I see are for stand-alone words.

The general answer to your question is "yes."

For red admiral butterfly, assuming the actual color is red I would use the keywords "red admiral butterfly, red, butterfly"

The word "admiral should be left out as people search for admiral would likely not be looking for the butterfly type. I don't know much (anything) about butterflies. If there are other types or colors of admiral butterflies you would likely want to add "admiral butterfly" as a keyword also.

-Mat

« Reply #2 on: December 14, 2018, 01:29 »
0
Thanks, Mat.
Oddly enough, the other common butterfly in that genus is not an admiral at all, it's a painted lady (Vanessa cardui), though in the US you call it the cosmopolitan.
« Last Edit: December 14, 2018, 01:33 by BaldricksTrousers »

dpimborough

« Reply #3 on: December 14, 2018, 01:50 »
+1
Take a Red admiral butterfly. Should it be keyworded as "Red, admiral, butterfly, Vanessa, atalanta" or "Red admiral, butterfly, Vanessa atalanta"?  Obviously, someone searching for an admiral (or a Vanessa) doesn't want an insect, but all the keyword examples I see are for stand-alone words.

The general answer to your question is "yes."

For red admiral butterfly, assuming the actual color is red I would use the keywords "red admiral butterfly, red, butterfly"

The word "admiral should be left out as people search for admiral would likely not be looking for the butterfly type. I don't know much (anything) about butterflies. If there are other types or colors of admiral butterflies you would likely want to add "admiral butterfly" as a keyword also.

-Mat

Any particular reason why the words "red" "butterfly" and "admiral" would need to be listed separately when its included in the phrase "red admiral butterfly"?

By what you say above there is no reason not to add "admiral" as a keyword as it is an essential identifier of the butterly.

Much like a "Monarch butterfly" or "Peacock butterly"

« Reply #4 on: December 14, 2018, 02:03 »
+1
Take a Red admiral butterfly. Should it be keyworded as "Red, admiral, butterfly, Vanessa, atalanta" or "Red admiral, butterfly, Vanessa atalanta"?  Obviously, someone searching for an admiral (or a Vanessa) doesn't want an insect, but all the keyword examples I see are for stand-alone words.

The general answer to your question is "yes."

For red admiral butterfly, assuming the actual color is red I would use the keywords "red admiral butterfly, red, butterfly"

The word "admiral should be left out as people search for admiral would likely not be looking for the butterfly type. I don't know much (anything) about butterflies. If there are other types or colors of admiral butterflies you would likely want to add "admiral butterfly" as a keyword also.

-Mat

Any particular reason why the words "red" "butterfly" and "admiral" would need to be listed separately when its included in the phrase "red admiral butterfly"?

By what you say above there is no reason not to add "admiral" as a keyword as it is an essential identifier of the butterly.

Much like a "Monarch butterfly" or "Peacock butterly"

This may be me showing ignorance about butterflies. My assumption was that someone search for "Admiral" would be looking for images of a naval commander and the word wouldn't be relevant on it's own in a butterfly search. Based on a quick search in Adobe Stock it looks like I'm wrong. The best advice I've been given from our metadata expert on staff is to list multiple words as one keyword and separately. "Arctic Fox, Arctic, Fox" as an example. Another would be "Golden Gate Bridge" which is appropriate as one keyword. In that example I would list "bridge" as a separate keyword but probably would not add "gate" or "golden" as individual keywords.

-Mat

« Reply #5 on: December 14, 2018, 02:42 »
+2
Hey Mat,

I've got a question regarding the title of the file. On most other sites, we are required to enter both a title and a description, but on AS only a title is needed.

Is it better to keep it short as a title or to create more of a description including for instance the type of shot, concept, backstory etc.?

Thanks for your help!

« Reply #6 on: December 14, 2018, 02:44 »
+1
It seems to me that with Golden Gate bridge someone looking for a generic bridge might be happy enough if the Golden Gate was offered, but with a red admiral the person looking for the butterfly would always search on the two words, not on admiral alone (but  might not use the term "butterfly", so that ought to be separate.
On the other hand, someone searching using the scientific latin might want examples of any or all the butterflies in the genus Vanessa or might want to be speific about the red admiral or painted lady and then would search on Vanessa atalanta or Vanessa cardui. So the logical terms for these two insects seem to be:
Red admiral,
red admiral butterfly,
Vanessa atalanta,
Vanessa,
butterfly,

Painted lady
Painted lady butterfly
Cosmopolitan - but I'm not sure anyone looking for a cosmopolitan butterfly would use the first word without the second, so maybe no need for this
Cosmopolitan butterfly,
Vanessa cardui
Vanessa
(no need for separate cardui or atalanta because someone looking for the species would always use the genus as well, as, for example, in Homo sapiens, not just sapiens).

Anyway, that seems to be the logical upshot of Mat's initial response. And if I've bungled the keywording of my red admiral, at least I should be able to get Isabella's tiger right now (the tiger with six legs instead of four).


« Reply #7 on: December 14, 2018, 02:56 »
0
posted in error

dpimborough

« Reply #8 on: December 14, 2018, 05:03 »
0

...And if I've bungled the keywording of my red admiral, at least I should be able to get Isabella's tiger right now (the tiger with six legs instead of four).

You can go back and amend the keywords in Adobe and their positions of course :)

« Reply #9 on: December 14, 2018, 05:40 »
0

...And if I've bungled the keywording of my red admiral, at least I should be able to get Isabella's tiger right now (the tiger with six legs instead of four).

You can go back and amend the keywords in Adobe and their positions of course :)
I guess that's after review, not while they're pending review as the data seem to be locked. (Nothing approved yet)

« Reply #10 on: December 14, 2018, 06:31 »
0
It seems to me that with Golden Gate bridge someone looking for a generic bridge might be happy enough if the Golden Gate was offered, but with a red admiral the person looking for the butterfly would always search on the two words, not on admiral alone (but  might not use the term "butterfly", so that ought to be separate.
On the other hand, someone searching using the scientific latin might want examples of any or all the butterflies in the genus Vanessa or might want to be speific about the red admiral or painted lady and then would search on Vanessa atalanta or Vanessa cardui. So the logical terms for these two insects seem to be:
Red admiral,
red admiral butterfly,
Vanessa atalanta,
Vanessa,
butterfly,

Painted lady
Painted lady butterfly
Cosmopolitan - but I'm not sure anyone looking for a cosmopolitan butterfly would use the first word without the second, so maybe no need for this
Cosmopolitan butterfly,
Vanessa cardui
Vanessa
(no need for separate cardui or atalanta because someone looking for the species would always use the genus as well, as, for example, in Homo sapiens, not just sapiens).

Anyway, that seems to be the logical upshot of Mat's initial response. And if I've bungled the keywording of my red admiral, at least I should be able to get Isabella's tiger right now (the tiger with six legs instead of four).
Indeed. Great answer.

Enviado desde mi ALP-L29 mediante Tapatalk


« Reply #11 on: December 18, 2018, 02:43 »
+3
Hey Mat,

I've got a question regarding the title of the file. On most other sites, we are required to enter both a title and a description, but on AS only a title is needed.

Is it better to keep it short as a title or to create more of a description including for instance the type of shot, concept, backstory etc.?

Thanks for your help!

Found the answer for those who want more info on the subject:
https://helpx.adobe.com/stock/contributor/help/titles-and-keyword.html

« Reply #12 on: December 18, 2018, 03:01 »
0
Hey Mat,

I've got a question regarding the title of the file. On most other sites, we are required to enter both a title and a description, but on AS only a title is needed.

Is it better to keep it short as a title or to create more of a description including for instance the type of shot, concept, backstory etc.?

Thanks for your help!

Found the answer for those who want more info on the subject:
https://helpx.adobe.com/stock/contributor/help/titles-and-keyword.html

Yeah, that's useful. Thanks.

Uncle Pete

  • Great Place by a Great Lake - My Home Port
« Reply #13 on: December 18, 2018, 13:11 »
0
Hey Mat,

I've got a question regarding the title of the file. On most other sites, we are required to enter both a title and a description, but on AS only a title is needed.

Is it better to keep it short as a title or to create more of a description including for instance the type of shot, concept, backstory etc.?

Thanks for your help!

Found the answer for those who want more info on the subject:
https://helpx.adobe.com/stock/contributor/help/titles-and-keyword.html

Thanks for the advise link, answers a question I had and never followed up: Titles are not searchable at Adobe Stock. Instead, content is found through keywords, so be sure to include all important words from the title as keywords.

Looks like I need to do some reading and adjusting.  :)

« Reply #14 on: December 18, 2018, 13:45 »
0
Hey Mat,

I've got a question regarding the title of the file. On most other sites, we are required to enter both a title and a description, but on AS only a title is needed.

Is it better to keep it short as a title or to create more of a description including for instance the type of shot, concept, backstory etc.?

Thanks for your help!

Found the answer for those who want more info on the subject:
https://helpx.adobe.com/stock/contributor/help/titles-and-keyword.html

Thanks for the advise link, answers a question I had and never followed up: Titles are not searchable at Adobe Stock. Instead, content is found through keywords, so be sure to include all important words from the title as keywords.

Looks like I need to do some reading and adjusting.  :)
Really? Wow

Enviado desde mi ALP-L29 mediante Tapatalk


« Reply #15 on: December 18, 2018, 14:26 »
+2
Hey Mat,

I've got a question regarding the title of the file. On most other sites, we are required to enter both a title and a description, but on AS only a title is needed.

Is it better to keep it short as a title or to create more of a description including for instance the type of shot, concept, backstory etc.?

Thanks for your help!

Found the answer for those who want more info on the subject:
https://helpx.adobe.com/stock/contributor/help/titles-and-keyword.html

Thanks for the advise link, answers a question I had and never followed up: Titles are not searchable at Adobe Stock. Instead, content is found through keywords, so be sure to include all important words from the title as keywords.

Looks like I need to do some reading and adjusting.  :)

I have a relatively new piece of information about this to share with you. While the title itself is not searchable, if you add a keyword that is also listed in the title, that word is given extra weight in the search results.

-Mat

« Reply #16 on: December 18, 2018, 14:43 »
0
Hey Mat,

I've got a question regarding the title of the file. On most other sites, we are required to enter both a title and a description, but on AS only a title is needed.

Is it better to keep it short as a title or to create more of a description including for instance the type of shot, concept, backstory etc.?

Thanks for your help!

Found the answer for those who want more info on the subject:
https://helpx.adobe.com/stock/contributor/help/titles-and-keyword.html

Thanks for the advise link, answers a question I had and never followed up: Titles are not searchable at Adobe Stock. Instead, content is found through keywords, so be sure to include all important words from the title as keywords.

Looks like I need to do some reading and adjusting.  :)

I have a relatively new piece of information about this to share with you. While the title itself is not searchable, if you add a keyword that is also listed in the title, that word is given extra weight in the search results.

-Mat

Oh nice, thanks Mat.

And what about the position of the words in the title - for instance 'Blue Hat Girl' vs 'Girl With Blue Hat' - would the first word hold more weight than the last given these words are also in the keywords? hehe

« Reply #17 on: December 18, 2018, 16:47 »
+3
Hey Mat,

I've got a question regarding the title of the file. On most other sites, we are required to enter both a title and a description, but on AS only a title is needed.

Is it better to keep it short as a title or to create more of a description including for instance the type of shot, concept, backstory etc.?

Thanks for your help!

Found the answer for those who want more info on the subject:
https://helpx.adobe.com/stock/contributor/help/titles-and-keyword.html

Thanks for the advise link, answers a question I had and never followed up: Titles are not searchable at Adobe Stock. Instead, content is found through keywords, so be sure to include all important words from the title as keywords.

Looks like I need to do some reading and adjusting.  :)

I have a relatively new piece of information about this to share with you. While the title itself is not searchable, if you add a keyword that is also listed in the title, that word is given extra weight in the search results.

-Mat

Oh nice, thanks Mat.

And what about the position of the words in the title - for instance 'Blue Hat Girl' vs 'Girl With Blue Hat' - would the first word hold more weight than the last given these words are also in the keywords? hehe

Your MSG alias answers your own question.

-Mat


 

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