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Author Topic: Extended Licences  (Read 4044 times)

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« on: October 04, 2006, 15:59 »
0
Hi,

I just got my first extended license today at iStock and I got $30 out of it. That means that the buyer paid $150 for the license, which surprises me since it is pretty mediocre picture.

The funny thing is that I have the same photo at Fotolia and he could have had an extended license there for $10.
I didn't really think about extended licenses much before but today got me thinking (I have had extended license sale on FT before which gave me $3.3 each).

So here are the questions:
Since I make a lot more money at iStock from extended license should I cancel the option of extended license at other web sites so customers go to iStock and I get a big payout?

Why did the guy pay $150 for the photo at iStock if he could have got it at FT for $10? (laziness to search around or the license is better at iStock)?

Are you offering extended licenses at all web sites?

Thanks,

Matej


« Reply #1 on: October 04, 2006, 16:09 »
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I have been doing microstock for two months, got 3 extended sale all from SS, nothing from any other site I joined, I got $20 each, I would leave the option open on all sites, because each site attract different customers, so by eliminating all the lower paying ones, you are limiting your own exposure.
By the way, all my pictures at FT price at $50 each, so I will get 17.5 if ever I get a sale from them.

« Reply #2 on: October 04, 2006, 16:13 »
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... which surprises me since it is pretty mediocre picture.

There's no telling what people want in this business. I got an extended licence through IS on a picture of some ends of blocks of wood, a picture I took on the spur of the moment when I was driving and stopped the car for a break.


Why did the guy pay $150 for the photo at iStock if he could have got it at FT for $10?

Who knows? The licence conditions could be different. The buyer may not know about FT. He could be on a project with a paying client so he's not bothered about the difference between $10 or $150 In fact, if a client is footing the bill ,the buyer may even prefer to pay $150. Even though they may be exactly the same images , the $150 makes it seem like a rather more special image than the $10 version.

My advice is to keep your options open. Try to sell your images wherever and whenever you can. It's all money.



« Reply #3 on: October 05, 2006, 00:48 »
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and raise your extended license prices at fotolia :)

« Reply #4 on: October 05, 2006, 01:49 »
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Agree - if you can raise yor fotolia prices, do.  YOu can send a message to admin and they will adjust your whole portolio.

Another point.  Designers probably charge out at $100-200 per hour???  It may actually be cheaper for them to DL the first one they see rather than hunt for a bargin.  The customer will be paying anyway so will be happy that are not paying marco prices.

« Reply #5 on: October 05, 2006, 06:42 »
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My advice is to keep your options open. Try to sell your images wherever and whenever you can. It's all money.


Agree. I have a several extended licesnes on IS, got from $60 to $80 per photo, and a lot of FT extended licenses for $10-17.


 

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