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Author Topic: How do u collect unpaid invoices for licenses u sold directly  (Read 5139 times)

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« on: August 04, 2010, 23:53 »
0
Hi,
I usually request payment upfront etc..but I slipped.
I know a lot of people may sell images licenses directly ....how you guys in the USA handle unpaid invoices considered you sent several invoice reminders, listened to excuses etc. The person is not usign the image, but you feel they will use in the future?

Basically things you could do without using collection agencies, laywers or small courts.
Do you send some sort of "final notice" , do you get a lawyer to send it for you?, or you send a letter of Cease and Desist?

Thanks


« Reply #1 on: August 05, 2010, 01:37 »
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How much is it?    What about contracts?  Did you make that image only for this, or was it a microstock image?

Is it wort the psycologic pain to keep trying and trying?   You have probably put more time already into the money issue than into the shot?

« Reply #2 on: August 05, 2010, 01:56 »
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It was for 300, not microstock. I did some work to customize, yes...
I didn't put money in the shoot, because actually was artwork..
so I didn't have expenses like photogs have.

« Reply #3 on: August 05, 2010, 07:19 »
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There isn't much else you can do, short of going the small claims court route, but I have done that in the past (not related to photo licenses). Even if you win the suit, you still need to collect the money. Which requires even more time and expense and you may never get the money from the person. If you do much threatening, you could be in trouble for harassment. Have you tried bartering with them? Taking something they have (like a product they sell, etc.) in exchange for the $300?

For $300, I would say "lesson learned". Always get the money up front unless you really know and trust the person. And if it's family, under any circumstances, get the money up front!  ;)
« Last Edit: August 05, 2010, 07:22 by cclapper »

« Reply #4 on: August 05, 2010, 11:59 »
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Hi thanks for answering...and sharing yoru experience...
You are right....the ammount is not worth the hassle... Im on the east coast, the person is on the west coast,
I would actually pay for more fillings, travelling, and never receiving the money LOL
Lesson learned, lesson learned. painfully.

There isn't much else you can do, short of going the small claims court route, but I have done that in the past (not related to photo licenses). Even if you win the suit, you still need to collect the money. Which requires even more time and expense and you may never get the money from the person. If you do much threatening, you could be in trouble for harassment. Have you tried bartering with them? Taking something they have (like a product they sell, etc.) in exchange for the $300?

For $300, I would say "lesson learned". Always get the money up front unless you really know and trust the person. And if it's family, under any circumstances, get the money up front!  ;)

« Reply #5 on: August 05, 2010, 12:04 »
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It is very common in the editorial market to deliver the image before receiving the payment.  When selling a print to an individual, however, I received the payment in advance (there is always the excuse of ordering the print & shipping).

With individuals, I think someone said here once that he uses a website such as Smugmug, putting the image(s) there and having the buyer pay and then download from there.

« Reply #6 on: August 05, 2010, 12:18 »
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With individuals, I think someone said here once that he uses a website such as Smugmug, putting the image(s) there and having the buyer pay and then download from there.

That's a good idea too. Then the transaction is done all at one time. As long as the payment from the buyer is instanteous, otherwise you are right back in the same situation where the buyer gets the photo and you might get jack.

« Reply #7 on: August 05, 2010, 12:37 »
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Great idea...Im going to check smugmug for next time it happens to be an individual asking for it.
i agree madelaide,..ad agencies, publishers, studios usually pay after.  :(

WarrenPrice

« Reply #8 on: August 05, 2010, 13:22 »
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Great idea...Im going to check smugmug for next time it happens to be an individual asking for it.
i agree madelaide,..ad agencies, publishers, studios usually pay after.  :(

I think the annual fee for a Pro Account at Smug Mug is $150?  I had thought of that for selling "event" pictures but didn't find it worth the time, trouble and cost.  There should be something similar for a bit less money?

« Reply #9 on: August 05, 2010, 19:08 »
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There must be other sites with the same result. If selling RF, it can be even SP. But I know many people who have accounts at Smugmug, so for them there is no extra cost (and they do like it).

« Reply #10 on: August 05, 2010, 21:00 »
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It was for 300, not microstock. I did some work to customize, yes...
I didn't put money in the shoot, because actually was artwork..
so I didn't have expenses like photogs have.

First, you should never send the high resolution image until they pay. If I have to spend any money to make the image (model etc) I would ask for an advance payment. Without an advance payment I wouldn't even think about it.
At the end when the image is ready I send a small sample like 500 x 300 pixels (watermark) and if they like it they have to pay for the HR file.
Money first, file second.
I use PayPal and when payment is clear, I send the image.
« Last Edit: August 05, 2010, 21:16 by Kone »

Pixel-Pizzazz

« Reply #11 on: September 30, 2010, 10:37 »
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I wonder what good it is to them if they haven't paid for the rights to use it.  Seems just like an unwatermarked comp, to me.

Can't you just license it to someone else instead and tell them they will need to contact you if they ever need to use the image to enquire about the availability of it and to obtain (pay for) license to use it?

« Reply #12 on: September 30, 2010, 23:11 »
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Is it a business that you sold it to?  If so, you may want to send them over a 10 day demand.  It is a demand letting them know you plan on turning this into a collection agency who will report it on their credit if they do not pay.  If they are a for profit business, you may want to add something about turning in a 1099-misc to the IRS on them at the end of the year also.  They would owe IRS taxes on the value of the work since it was 'free'.  I would also actually consider turning it over to a collection agency if I where you.  They do all the work and take about 30%, so you still get 70%.  You can usually get them to do a 10 day demand for free.

« Reply #13 on: October 04, 2010, 06:01 »
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I just send Luigi and the boys round with a couple of crowbars. Works like a dream  ;D

Would you like to hire them, sweetgirl?


 

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