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Author Topic: Save as Tiff or PSP?  (Read 5209 times)

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donding

  • Think before you speak
« on: January 02, 2011, 12:45 »
0
I've seen a lot of people mention they save their files as TIFF then save to jpg. I always open my raw do modifications then either save as PSP or to jpg. Do you save to Tiff before you do any editing then save to jpg? What's the difference?


« Reply #1 on: January 02, 2011, 13:31 »
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The way I do it (for what it is worth) is that I keep three versions of each file:
RAW - PSD layered - Jpeg (for agencies)

The reason I keep a layered PSD file is since my camera isn't Pro quality (Nikon D80) I tend to work hard in Photoshop to get the most out of the RAW I can, this always involves Masks which I want to keep.
« Last Edit: January 02, 2011, 13:35 by etienjones »

« Reply #2 on: January 02, 2011, 13:38 »
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The way I do it (for what it is worth) is that I keep three versions of each file:
RAW - PSD layered - Jpeg (for agencies)
I used to do it the same way but I just found that saving uncompressed (layered) tif works several times faster than saving a PSD file - important when you need to edit multiple files in a row.

« Reply #3 on: January 02, 2011, 13:48 »
0
The way I do it (for what it is worth) is that I keep three versions of each file:
RAW - PSD layered - Jpeg (for agencies)
I used to do it the same way but I just found that saving uncompressed (layered) tif works several times faster than saving a PSD file - important when you need to edit multiple files in a row.

You are right, every week I tell myself I should create a little Photoshop Action and convert my portfolio to Tiff but layered Tiffs are larger in size . . . .  maybe buy a larger backup storage first.

« Reply #4 on: January 02, 2011, 14:09 »
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I think layered tiff's are smaller actually ( if you compress them).  You can choose a lossless compression method that makes them smaller than PSD files (if I remember correctly). 

I keep a RAW file, the edited layered tiff and a JPG for uploading.

rubyroo

« Reply #5 on: January 02, 2011, 14:13 »
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Really?  My TIFFs are/were massive in comparison to the RAW or a PSD.

I switched to layered PSD's from TIFFs a little while ago because I kept running out of disk space, and got fed up with having to repeatedly pay for new hard disks and bigger back-up drives.  I keep the RAWs, of course.

« Reply #6 on: January 02, 2011, 14:19 »
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Really?  My TIFFs are/were massive in comparison to the RAW or a PSD.

I switched to layered PSD's from TIFFs a little while ago because I kept running out of disk space, and got fed up with having to repeatedly pay for new hard disks and bigger back-up drives.  I keep the RAWs, of course.
Perhaps i'll have to double check again...?!

« Reply #7 on: January 02, 2011, 14:29 »
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Did I miss the price of storage going up lately or are you only using ssd's  ;)

rubyroo

« Reply #8 on: January 02, 2011, 14:41 »
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You haven't seen the rent we have to pay...  ;)

donding

  • Think before you speak
« Reply #9 on: January 02, 2011, 14:42 »
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So let me understand...it's better to save as Tiff  because you lose less by saving as tiff and is it better if you have to come back and reedit again?

« Reply #10 on: January 02, 2011, 15:25 »
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Right, after doing your RAW corrections open in 16bit RBG Color space as a PSD in Photoshop (up until now everything is of the highest quality with no compression).  Work the image with adjustment layers, save layered work as a PSD or Tiff (quality is the same).  Flatten, shapen, change to sRGB (Edit - Convert to Profile), save copy as jpeg (quality12) for agencies.
« Last Edit: January 02, 2011, 15:30 by etienjones »

lisafx

« Reply #11 on: January 02, 2011, 16:53 »
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You guys are a lot more organized than I am.  I only save the RAW (with changes backed up in Lightroom catalogue), and the final Jpeg.   Once I have a jpeg I like and upload it, I don't bother revisiting it later.  The handful of times I have had to re-edit a file, I go straight back to the RAW. 

« Reply #12 on: January 02, 2011, 18:59 »
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If I make just simple adjustments like curves, I save a TIFF.  This is basically what I do, and I take note of the adjustments to reproduce them in other files of the same series.

If I make more elaborate adjustments, such as using mask layers, I save a PSP file, so I can redo something if needed, without having to start all over.

RacePhoto

« Reply #13 on: January 03, 2011, 01:12 »
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Right, after doing your RAW corrections open in 16bit RBG Color space as a PSD in Photoshop (up until now everything is of the highest quality with no compression).  Work the image with adjustment layers, save layered work as a PSD or Tiff (quality is the same).  Flatten, shapen, change to sRGB (Edit - Convert to Profile), save copy as jpeg (quality12) for agencies.

What if I like saving at level 11. (please ignore me, it's just a troll based on so many of these threads appearing this week, TIF or PSD, RGB or sRGB, Etc.)  ;D

I was dong my best to not jump in here and say "Oh I save mine as TIF" because I do, but I also have found more and more often, that Inever go back, and eventually the TIFs are just sitting on a backup drive, taking up space, while the final JPGs are archived somewhere else.

Here's the other answer about space. Office Depot (and I'm sure other places will have similar sales) had a 1T external USB drive for $59 last month! If I saved everything I shoot this year 2011, original, edited TIF and final JPG and some other versions including panoramas, webcam, AVI, time lapse, and everything I shoot with five different cameras... I won't fill that drive! Paying fill price it's still about $89 from any common store or website. 1 Terabyte! That's cheap.

If someone thinks their photos are valuable and worth protecting, then spending such a minimal amount on dual external 1T drives, is a tiny insurance investment for reliable, redundant backup.

My first 10MB hard drive cost $800 and I thought it was huge and really cool.  :o The computer was using 5 1/4 320k single sided floppy disks at the time.

molka

    This user is banned.
« Reply #14 on: January 03, 2011, 08:31 »
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....had a 1T external USB drive for $59 last month!


You'll just love it when that $60 drive makes that tipical 'trapped tiny fly' sound and won't be accesible anymore.

« Reply #15 on: January 03, 2011, 17:02 »
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That's why you get 2 of them, and when one dies you get a third and copy the good one onto that... I have a stack of naked drives and a dock. It isn't ideal, but it should cover the most likely scenarios.

RacePhoto

« Reply #16 on: January 03, 2011, 17:38 »
0

....had a 1T external USB drive for $59 last month!


You'll just love it when that $60 drive makes that tipical 'trapped tiny fly' sound and won't be accesible anymore.

Made by Verbatim, not some fly-by-night upstart.

But you are correct. Remember the Zip drive, click of death? When it made that sound, your data was on the disc but the drive had just turned into toast. :(

After years of saving my photos and sometimes wondering why, because no one cares much once they are archived or made ready for sale... (another issue) I've found that in order of reliability, hard drives last best and hold the data better than anything else. Old drives, fill em up, put them on a shelf and they don't go bad. External USB is the same. Unplug it and save it. Next is CDs but they don't hold as much as they once did with smaller pictures. DVDs which are my emergency last resort back-ups and I don't trust them, don't count on the data being 100% there, and basically burn them just in case there's a catastrophic failure and I'd be happy with something, instead of nothing.

My preferred system would be two 1T drives, raid 1 where everything is mirrored. If a drive takes a dive, nothing is lost, just add another one and you're back up and 100%.

I've seen people complain that they formatted a hard drive or that they lost all their backup data, because they deleted everything. They won't saw that they were the cause, just that the whole backup was lost "somehow" and avoid the truth that they were the cause.

Ask yourself, how many times have you had your hard drive completely lose all data or crash? In other words, a simple backup and you'll probably never ever need it. That's why a cheap $59 1T external drive works so well. You have everything you shoot forever, on a drive. Each year you buy a new one and put the old one on the shelf. It's still good. New drives keep going down in price... I have everything on a 300GB drive, bought a 400 the next year, have everything on that, bought a 500 the next year, have everything on that, and when I get the next 1T drive, I'll put everything from the 500 onto it plus what's new and have redundant backups, because the main computer has the roiginals.

The point that started this was someone saying how their hard drive was filling when they saved all their PSD or TIF files.

And what I say is, for $59 you can back up all those old, mostly useless files, and keep your active work on the computer hard drive. Yes, I back up cards, right out of the camera, then copy them to the working computer, and only then format the cards in the camera. I've never yet, needed the backups because of a computer error, hard drive crash or losing the zero track or lost data of any sort. But I have needed them when I hit delete or threw away something by accident. Most lost data is Human Error!  ::)

Maybe I'm just lucky but it seems that when my computers take a dive, they are already backed up or old. Oh wait, everything I own is old and started as a used computer except my Netbook and my external backup drives. :D

molka

    This user is banned.
« Reply #17 on: January 05, 2011, 07:18 »
0

....had a 1T external USB drive for $59 last month!


You'll just love it when that $60 drive makes that tipical 'trapped tiny fly' sound and won't be accesible anymore.

Made by Verbatim, not some fly-by-night upstart.

But you are correct. Remember the Zip drive, click of death? When it made that sound, your data was on the disc but the drive had just turned into toast. :(

After years of saving my photos and sometimes wondering why, because no one cares much once they are archived or made ready for sale... (another issue) I've found that in order of reliability, hard drives last best and hold the data better than anything else. Old drives, fill em up, put them on a shelf and they don't go bad. External USB is the same. Unplug it and save it. Next is CDs but they don't hold as much as they once did with smaller pictures. DVDs which are my emergency last resort back-ups and I don't trust them, don't count on the data being 100% there, and basically burn them just in case there's a catastrophic failure and I'd be happy with something, instead of nothing.

My preferred system would be two 1T drives, raid 1 where everything is mirrored. If a drive takes a dive, nothing is lost, just add another one and you're back up and 100%.

I've seen people complain that they formatted a hard drive or that they lost all their backup data, because they deleted everything. They won't saw that they were the cause, just that the whole backup was lost "somehow" and avoid the truth that they were the cause.

Ask yourself, how many times have you had your hard drive completely lose all data or crash? In other words, a simple backup and you'll probably never ever need it. That's why a cheap $59 1T external drive works so well. You have everything you shoot forever, on a drive. Each year you buy a new one and put the old one on the shelf. It's still good. New drives keep going down in price... I have everything on a 300GB drive, bought a 400 the next year, have everything on that, bought a 500 the next year, have everything on that, and when I get the next 1T drive, I'll put everything from the 500 onto it plus what's new and have redundant backups, because the main computer has the roiginals.

The point that started this was someone saying how their hard drive was filling when they saved all their PSD or TIF files.

And what I say is, for $59 you can back up all those old, mostly useless files, and keep your active work on the computer hard drive. Yes, I back up cards, right out of the camera, then copy them to the working computer, and only then format the cards in the camera. I've never yet, needed the backups because of a computer error, hard drive crash or losing the zero track or lost data of any sort. But I have needed them when I hit delete or threw away something by accident. Most lost data is Human Error!  ::)

Maybe I'm just lucky but it seems that when my computers take a dive, they are already backed up or old. Oh wait, everything I own is old and started as a used computer except my Netbook and my external backup drives. :D

I don't trust any brand by now, with a few very rare exceptions. As people sinking into consumeridiotism get dumber and dumber, these corps get the chance to move away from reliability, value etc (they are expensive), and rely solely on marketing to sell stuff to the common idiot. Many used-to-be reputable brands sunk into junk category in the last few years. The problem with HDs is that if they are broken, data rescue can get scary expensive. At the place I know where I live they charge several 100 $ just for taking the drive to have a look at it.


 

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