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Author Topic: Do You Ever Use Your Lens Hood?  (Read 11600 times)

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« on: March 08, 2011, 16:08 »
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Just wondering. I never do.


« Reply #1 on: March 08, 2011, 16:10 »
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I always use. I get better contrast in difficult lighting and it also protects the lens.

« Reply #2 on: March 08, 2011, 16:13 »
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always have a hood on, not because of any particular reason just habit take lens cap off put hood on.

« Reply #3 on: March 08, 2011, 16:30 »
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A hood is important for reducing or eliminating lens flare. I like to get the best results that I can from my cameras.

microstockphoto.co.uk

« Reply #4 on: March 08, 2011, 16:30 »
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Never use.
I wonder if it makes any difference except when the sun light is pointing directly towards the lens.

« Reply #5 on: March 08, 2011, 16:38 »
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I always use it, although I guess it's not necessary in situations where you control all aspects of the light. 

My Bigma/Sigma drives me crazy though, must remove the hood to return the lens cap.  Stupidest lens I ever wasted $1700 bucks on.

« Reply #6 on: March 08, 2011, 16:39 »
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I wonder if it makes any difference except when the sun light is pointing directly towards the lens.


That is the only time when lens hood does NOT help.

But every time any light gets in the lens from the sides it's bad for the contrast.

Decent lens hoods is one of the reasons why I shoot with primes (zooms doesn't have very effective lens hoods due to obvious reasons)


See the difference?
« Last Edit: March 08, 2011, 16:48 by Perry »

« Reply #7 on: March 08, 2011, 17:04 »
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I wonder if it makes any difference except when the sun light is pointing directly towards the lens.


That is the only time when lens hood does NOT help.

But every time any light gets in the lens from the sides it's bad for the contrast.

Decent lens hoods is one of the reasons why I shoot with primes (zooms doesn't have very effective lens hoods due to obvious reasons)


See the difference?



The second one is technically ok, but I'd still say LCV  ;D



On topic: I always use the lens hood.

« Reply #8 on: March 08, 2011, 17:07 »
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I use it on my macro lens, but not on my regular lens. I kept getting a bit to close without the hood on my macro  ::)

« Reply #9 on: March 08, 2011, 17:08 »
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The hood of my 17-40mm is always in the pouch, and I never use it. I think it calls too much attention and there is also the lens cap difficulty. Maybe if I used it for a long shooting session, but I use it mainly for landscapes and urban scenes, shoot a couple here, a couple there. Without the hood it is also easier to take it out and back my backpack.

I know the right thing is to use it, but...

microstockphoto.co.uk

« Reply #10 on: March 08, 2011, 17:27 »
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I wonder if it makes any difference except when the sun light is pointing directly towards the lens.


That is the only time when lens hood does NOT help.

But every time any light gets in the lens from the sides it's bad for the contrast.

Decent lens hoods is one of the reasons why I shoot with primes (zooms doesn't have very effective lens hoods due to obvious reasons)


See the difference?


Ok, I see the difference. But that situation happens rarely, because the subject is bad lit anyway when the sun is in that position.

« Reply #11 on: March 08, 2011, 17:54 »
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My macro has a built-in hood.   ;D  Wide angle all depends on the situation.  It casts a shadow when using a flash, and since I use flash quite a bit with the wide angle, I usually keep it off.  But, I'll put it back when there's too much glare.

« Reply #12 on: March 08, 2011, 18:24 »
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My macro has a built-in hood.   ;D  Wide angle all depends on the situation.  It casts a shadow when using a flash, and since I use flash quite a bit with the wide angle, I usually keep it off.  But, I'll put it back when there's too much glare.

Agree with Karimala, use it all the time except when it is a problem

« Reply #13 on: March 08, 2011, 20:11 »
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^^ +1

Plus, if you drop a lens, your hood can save your optics!

« Reply #14 on: March 09, 2011, 03:44 »
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^^ +1

Plus, if you drop a lens, your hood can save your optics!

Yep, I use it all the time and instead don't use a UV filter.  The lens hood has saved my lens a few times and as mentioned, gives better contrast in the process.

« Reply #15 on: March 09, 2011, 04:31 »
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Plus, if you drop a lens, your hood can save your optics!

That is the main reason I have the lens hood on

RacePhoto

« Reply #16 on: March 09, 2011, 05:18 »
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^^ +1

Plus, if you drop a lens, your hood can save your optics!

Yep, I use it all the time and instead don't use a UV filter.  The lens hood has saved my lens a few times and as mentioned, gives better contrast in the process.

Except I use a UV filter and a lens hood, all the time and this just explained to me something I hadn't thought of. If someone has a UV filter and no lens hood, they are going to get some ugly glare and reflections that I wont. Ah Ha... I never thought of that?

Even if I didn't have a UV filter, the lens hood serves a purpose. I was laughing at this thread because, like other things that have been devised and invented to solve a problem, some people insist that we are using them for unnecessary reasons? Makes me wonder why lenses have lens hoods and why they were invented, if they do nothing but protect the lens? That's down the list for me. I hate lens flare and glare. :)

By the way, keep in mind, I shoot about 98% outdoors, all weather, varied conditions, wind, dust, rain or snow, with natural light. Just like many of these discussions, what do you shoot and where can change the answers. I carry a clear plastic bag and rubber bands for weather proofing too.


« Reply #17 on: March 09, 2011, 05:54 »
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I use lens hoods all the time and no UV filter. All my hoods have scratches and dent on them, so I am sure the lens would be all tore up if I did not use them.

graficallyminded

« Reply #18 on: March 09, 2011, 09:44 »
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Yeah, always - because normally I don't use filters.  Buying a $1000 lens just to put a piece of crummy $50 glass in front of it just doesn't make sense to me. It also increases contrast in a lot of situations.  Do tests with/without.  Sometimes it doesn't really matter, but if you're using it to protect the lens, it does.

WarrenPrice

« Reply #19 on: March 09, 2011, 10:22 »
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I use the lens hood and crummy piece of glass.  Like Race, I shoot motor sports, more specifically, motocross.  Can't tell you the times I've wiped clumps of mud and dirt from that crummy piece of glass in front of my lens; Rocks usually just bounce off.

 Plus, I've read that constant cleaning can affect the lens coating.  I prefer cleaning the filter.

The hood is primarily to reduce lens glare.  Never know which direction I may have to swing the lens ... it does help.

graficallyminded

« Reply #20 on: March 09, 2011, 10:44 »
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That's a perfect example.  If I shot racing or off road sports, I wouldn't go anywhere without having a filter and hood on either.  It really depends on the type of stuff you're shooting.

« Reply #21 on: March 09, 2011, 15:02 »
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Plus, if you drop a lens, your hood can save your optics!

That is the main reason I have the lens hood on

Actually, this is a very good reason to have the hood on:) A friend of mine toppled the tripod with camera mounted on it - the hood broke but saved the lens (I sold him my old heavy tripod after that...  ;D )
I always use hoods - Nikon lenses come with them, I see no reason not to use the hood, just advantages.

« Reply #22 on: March 09, 2011, 16:25 »
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My kid who knocked my camera off a bench, busted the hood that was attached on the front.  I was quite mad for a second, but then I thought about the fact that I paid $1399 or maybe $1499 for that lens and was lucky that only the hood was broken.  The replacement hood was around $37 - for such a wee piece of plastic. 


« Reply #24 on: March 09, 2011, 17:49 »
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I very rarely use lens hoods although I know I should. It seems a bit pointless when shooting with studio lights which is most of the time for me. If I'm outdoors then in sunny conditions I'll probably be using a polarizer which I need to rotate according to the horiz/vert plane I'm working in and/or the effect I want. About the only time I always use the hoods is when there's rain about. When I'm driving around in a campervan I usually have two bodies with me, one with a 24-70mm and the other with a telephoto zoom permanently mounted for the trip. Hoods are useful then as I can just sling the cameras down by my side ready for action without having to remove lens caps.

RacePhoto

« Reply #25 on: March 09, 2011, 23:30 »
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That's a perfect example.  If I shot racing or off road sports, I wouldn't go anywhere without having a filter and hood on either.  It really depends on the type of stuff you're shooting.

Yes, I thgink that was my point, indoors, people may find a lens hood superfluous. Outside essential. :)

That UV filter adds contrast? There's one more point for why I like them. I'm a contrasty kind of guy.

Just thought of another one, for the no hood people (who probably don't wear seat belts, because it might make a wear mark on their shirt, it's restricting, or they don't have accidents. :D  )

I've only had something close to this happen once, but I've seen stories and lenses for sale with "filter stuck on" after someone banged it and warped the threads. The other side is, banging the front of the lens and making it so you can't add any filter because the threads just got dented.

A hood isn't just for protection, it's more for glare and reflections, but now that people have pointed it out, it does protect more than the glass at the end. It also helps the barrel and the threads.

Hey it makes the lens look bigger and more impressive too? ;)

microstockphoto.co.uk

« Reply #26 on: March 10, 2011, 02:06 »
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Hey it makes the lens look bigger and more impressive too? ;)

this ain't always a good point - when I'm shooting alone in derelict suburbs in large cities, or when there're a lot of bobbies who think photographers are terrorists - I am not sure I want everybody to notice me


« Reply #27 on: March 10, 2011, 05:19 »
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and it is not unusual for me to bang glass into sitting guests heads, etc. 

let me know when you are in the room, prefer to sit on the other side from you ;D

« Reply #28 on: March 10, 2011, 07:05 »
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Lens hood should be used on tabletop product shots in studio too when using strobes. Don't have a lens hood? Use a black gaffer tape.  ;)

« Reply #29 on: March 10, 2011, 11:51 »
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When shooting from a moving helicopter with no door do not stick the camera out into the wind stream when you have the lens hood on. It makes a very efficient wind sail.

OM

« Reply #30 on: March 10, 2011, 18:17 »
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I always use a lens hood on my 50mm Nikkor as it is prone to flare from bright backlight. But I don't use the Nikon lenshood designed for it but a metal hood intended for a 135mm Pentax! With APS sensor I don't seem to get vignetting using such a long hood.

« Reply #31 on: March 10, 2011, 19:58 »
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Hi All,

 I always use them you never know when you might get a flare and the image does seem to have better contrast. The main reason I use them is it is a cheap protection for your lens when you are on the move.

Best,
Jonathan


 

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