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Author Topic: How do you ask to sign Model Release?  (Read 4374 times)

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« on: August 11, 2010, 20:18 »
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Do you have a suggestion on what to say when you ask them to sign it?

I don't want to be like ... Hey, sign this so I can sell you picture and it may be used for a herpes ad ..  got anything more tactful?

we were discussing this in another topic, but I just was curious what you folks say to people when you ask them to sign.  Especially when it's a random person that you don't know and doesn't know anything about microstock.

thanks..


« Reply #1 on: August 11, 2010, 20:56 »
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I don't ask random people I don't know.  Problem solved :)  .

« Reply #2 on: August 11, 2010, 21:22 »
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You just ask. They'll either say yes or no. Don't forget to tale a witness with you LOL

« Reply #3 on: August 11, 2010, 21:24 »
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If I'm hoping for a release, I'll raise the subject before we shoot.  That way we can talk about it as much as we need to.  I can show them the release, explain microstock and give them a link to my portfolio on one of the sites.  The one thing I don't do is spring a release on anyone as we're heading out the door after a shoot.  Give them a chance to think about it.

« Reply #4 on: August 12, 2010, 02:44 »
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Especially when it's a random person that you don't know and doesn't know anything about microstock.
It's simple. You make a form exactly like the model release stating "I agree to receive 1,000,000$ as the XYZ lottery winner". Make sure to cut out a clean square at the place of the signature, and put the MRF underneath.

Seriously, don't ask random people. Ask people that enlisted as models on model sites, ask friends that know the concept, agree to shoot some good shots for their FB for free on condition you can do some stock work too.

Many people are very reluctant to see their faces online, especially when you explain them the (small but real) risks. It's unfair to force them, certainly friends. If they do so, pay them a fair amount afterwards, when the shoot went well and they did their best in terms of salable stock.

Doing like this, I have a long waiting list for models in the Phils. I had to learn it the hard way after a year of no returns. If people want glamor shots (they all do), make a deal and give them what they want - after you did your stuff.

« Reply #5 on: August 12, 2010, 06:51 »
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Easy, you just tell them that you're some big shot photographer who can make them into the next Claudia Schiffer and earn millions of dollars. But of course the first few pictures are free.

Usually they stop listening after "millions of dollars" and sign anything.

 ;D ::)

« Reply #6 on: August 12, 2010, 12:02 »
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If it's just a random person that makes sense at a location I ask them if they want to be seen by millions of people around the world. If so, please sign here. No mention of money although I promise them I'll email them a copy of the image (for their Facebook page, etc.) if they'd like. The younger they are the more apt they are to sign.

« Reply #7 on: August 12, 2010, 12:28 »
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thanks.. all great advice.  I just wondered because sometimes when i am out and about I see interesting people doing interesting things and was just curious how others approach people in the situation. 

« Reply #8 on: August 21, 2010, 21:15 »
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make a portfolio of your work about twtnry to thirty images. Just some real good 4x6 or 5x7's. By showing them that you  are pro and also giving them a copy of the print, msot people will be happy to sign. Also be willing to give them a med res. jpeg. One of your outtakes so they can send a copy to mom or facebook. After school is in, I am going to run an post in craigslist that I am willing to shoot a casual portrait (environmental) for free if they willing to sign a release for stock photography

« Reply #9 on: August 22, 2010, 09:22 »
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make a portfolio of your work about twtnry to thirty images. Just some real good 4x6 or 5x7's. By showing them that you  are pro and also giving them a copy of the print, msot people will be happy to sign. Also be willing to give them a med res. jpeg. One of your outtakes so they can send a copy to mom or facebook. After school is in, I am going to run an post in craigslist that I am willing to shoot a casual portrait (environmental) for free if they willing to sign a release for stock photography

I wouldn't carry a portfolio around as you suggest and try to "sell" anyone on my professionalism. That seems unprofessional to me. Better -- and easier to carry is a business card. But I think this topic question is mostly for how to handle the off-chance encounter on the street.

I do like the Craigs List idea. A portrait class at my local jr. college did that and we had a large response of talented models on the way up and actress/actor wannabes. They worked hard for free prints. This was in a Chicago suburb and many of these models drove from far distances to participate.

ShadySue

  • There is a crack in everything
« Reply #10 on: August 22, 2010, 09:56 »
0

Do you have a suggestion on what to say when you ask them to sign it?

I don't want to be like ... Hey, sign this so I can sell you picture and it may be used for a herpes ad ..  got anything more tactful?

we were discussing this in another topic, but I just was curious what you folks say to people when you ask them to sign.  Especially when it's a random person that you don't know and doesn't know anything about microstock.

thanks..

Having spent three years with no success (they didn't want their image to be used for products/causes they didn't agree with, which I 100% understand, and/or there's no way they would give their personal details to a stranger), I now shoot RM/Editorial, and if the context allows I tell people I'm shooting for newspapers, magazine editorials or textbooks. I've gone from 100% refusal (though it was OK to take the photos) to only one rejection, and that young woman didn't want her photo taken at all (pity, because she was with a group of other girls who were right up for it), I didn't even mention using them. Not having to give away details is a great plus.
Downside is sometimes the people want to know exactly what publication they'll be used in so that they can look out for it.
Another upside is that random people doing interesting things are often wearning/using items which would need PRs, which won't do for the micros.
Plus, I'm still waiting for any real payoff. That said, many people shoot people for micros with very little success. (I know that the rewards are there for those with the most suitable models and with the requisite equipment and skillset.)


 

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