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Author Topic: National parks and filming permits  (Read 3071 times)

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« on: October 22, 2016, 22:43 »
0
Do you apply for filming permits to film stock video in National parks around the world?

After reading some regulations, US parks already have a topic for stock video and photography.

Regulations for commercial filming are quite strict and fees pretty high.


alno

« Reply #1 on: October 23, 2016, 04:45 »
+1
Do you apply for filming permits to film stock video in National parks around the world?

After reading some regulations, US parks already have a topic for stock video and photography.

Regulations for commercial filming are quite strict and fees pretty high.

What's wrong with NOT asking permission in advance? Especially if you don't have 5 men crew and van full of drones and Reds.

« Reply #2 on: October 23, 2016, 09:04 »
+4
Do you apply for filming permits to film stock video in National parks around the world?

After reading some regulations, US parks already have a topic for stock video and photography.

Regulations for commercial filming are quite strict and fees pretty high.

What's wrong with NOT asking permission in advance? Especially if you don't have 5 men crew and van full of drones and Reds.

Nothing. But if you are a single contributor hoping to get a few sales from your work for a $23 commission and the permit costs $2 grand....well.  I wanted to shoot at Mauna Kea Observatory and looked into their shooting commercial permits. It would have cost me thousands in permitting to shoot stills or video. I told them that I was shooting where I might make 38 cents for a photo and $23 for a video, but they didn't care.  So, in the end, you really have to consider the cost of the permit, hopefully free but not always.

« Reply #3 on: October 23, 2016, 23:02 »
0
It is funny that you usually don't need a permit for photography, but if you press record on your DSLR, you need one and you are treated like a big production company with their own set.

« Reply #4 on: October 24, 2016, 08:46 »
+1
Every country has its own rules. In Brazil for example you CANNOT shoot commercial photos or videos of any kind without paying a fee and requesting a permit. Period.  :-\

In the US they worry about destruction of the park, so if you land there with models, props, a number of video cameras and ready for the show, you will be approached most likely and asked for a permit.

If you show up with your camera and take photos quietly and don't disturb, don't move things, don't put your tripod in the middle of the trail blocking people from walking etc, you will be fine.





Do you apply for filming permits to film stock video in National parks around the world?

After reading some regulations, US parks already have a topic for stock video and photography.

Regulations for commercial filming are quite strict and fees pretty high.

alno

« Reply #5 on: October 24, 2016, 09:18 »
+2
Every country has its own rules. In Brazil for example you CANNOT shoot commercial photos or videos of any kind without paying a fee and requesting a permit. Period.  :-\


How do they know a person shooting commercially for sure? There are too many rich amateurs carrying medium format cameras as well as there are numbers of stock agencies accepting and even welcoming mobile photography. Some travellers' Youtube channels can earn decent money with with views and ads only. There are too many relatively new ways of earning money, those 1960's regulations often seem really pathetic. Some time ago and maybe even now there were regulations in Moscow subway forbidding specificly video shooting. That's because of huge wooden tripod I guess :)

« Reply #6 on: October 25, 2016, 10:23 »
0
Nowdays you can easy shoot stock in the parks without getting asked what are you doing. With a small camera ofcourse.

But what happens when you upload this footage, can they hunt you down? Yellowstone for example has a strict policy about stock. They know a lot even about stock contracts. And there are other parks which don't know what stock is.

alno

« Reply #7 on: October 25, 2016, 12:16 »
0
Nowdays you can easy shoot stock in the parks without getting asked what are you doing. With a small camera ofcourse.

But what happens when you upload this footage, can they hunt you down? Yellowstone for example has a strict policy about stock. They know a lot even about stock contracts. And there are other parks which don't know what stock is.

Well, who are they finally to "hunt you down"? Common national parks or national security agencies? :)

« Reply #8 on: December 27, 2016, 02:43 »
0
deleted
« Last Edit: December 27, 2016, 02:47 by unnonimus »


 

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