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Author Topic: Buyer Wants me to Send High Res file  (Read 2194 times)

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angelawaye

  • Eat, Sleep, Keyword. Repeat

« on: November 18, 2016, 15:37 »
0
I'm opted out of extended licenses and a buyer contacted me about using one of my images for a book. I was happy to be contacted but then they wanted me to send a low resolution copy of it. I mentioned they can just use the watermark preview (which is high quality). Then they emailed today asking for the high resolution file. I said I can't send it before payment is made and they said Shutterstock gives customers high resolution images. She said they can't pay me before it is published.

It all seems very strange to me... Anyone ever had this happen?


« Reply #1 on: November 18, 2016, 15:59 »
+8
Sounds like a scam. They can purchase a high res file from Shutterstock. I say run away as fast as you can.

Giveme5

« Reply #2 on: November 18, 2016, 16:13 »
+1
Yes and tell them NO!

Giveme5

« Reply #3 on: November 18, 2016, 16:14 »
0
....

« Reply #4 on: November 18, 2016, 16:14 »
+5
That's a crock of you know what
What do you think will happen after tyou give them a high resolution image?
They can use a low resolution or watermarked image for initial layout without any issues  This is the norm

« Reply #5 on: November 18, 2016, 16:21 »
+4
It depends on who the buyer is. If it's a large company and they're willing to sign a contract for the price, payable on publication (with perhaps some small payment up front for licensing the full resolution for comp use), I'd go for it, albeit for a higher price than if they pay up front.

Alamy's pricing is higher in part because they give such generous terms to their large customers - use now and pay whenever. I did a deal a few years ago with a publishing company that puts out home improvement books. They wanted to use 4 of my images and after OK'ing the watermarked ones, wanted the unwatermarked version to put the book together. I was paid when they published (which was very delayed because of the 2008 financial meltdown). I would not have done the deal if it wasn't a known business entity as the risk of non-payment would have been way too high.

If you decide to go ahead, make sure everything is in writing and signed :)

« Reply #6 on: November 18, 2016, 16:32 »
0
Sorry, I missed this on the first read-through..."I'm opted out of extended licenses". So, what Jo Ann said.  :)

angelawaye

  • Eat, Sleep, Keyword. Repeat

« Reply #7 on: November 19, 2016, 10:01 »
+1
Thanks everyone. Jo Ann, I think that is the case with me. They seem like a big UK company. I just don't feel right about sending a high res file without any payment.

Rose Tinted Glasses

« Reply #8 on: November 19, 2016, 10:16 »
0
As Jo Ann said... Sending hi-res up front is a normal practice with any established publisher of reputation. And payment usually ranges from upon publication to 30-60-90 days after publication. Agree to the price and terms up front in writing and send the image.

« Reply #9 on: November 19, 2016, 15:34 »
0
Thanks everyone. Jo Ann, I think that is the case with me. They seem like a big UK company. I just don't feel right about sending a high res file without any payment.

Put together a small contract and send that to them first. They have some great examples in a couple of the AIGA books that you could tailor to fit your needs.


 

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