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Author Topic: Photos of the Forgotten: Minorities, homeless, low-income - Do you have any?  (Read 3875 times)

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« on: February 11, 2013, 19:26 »
0
I am collecting research on the availability of photos I can't seem to find very many of at most stock sites: candid shots of everyday people - minorities, homeless, low-income, developmentally challenged, etc. And if I do find some photos of minorities they're immaculate shiny happy people wearing white and perfectly composed. There aren't that many realistic photos out there - everything I find is posed, smiling and conceptually unbelievable.

I would like to know if you, as microstock photographers, ever take photos of these forgotten that you just haven't submitted to the current providers? Do you have a large catalog of these photos you want to submit but the current websites reject them?

Do you know there is a demand for this kind of diversity?

Would you shoot more of these kinds of models?

What are the issues you've encountered if you've tried it before?

Thanks!
Rana


Ed

« Reply #1 on: February 11, 2013, 19:32 »
0
Yes, I have images of this topic. They are not available at Microstock agencies - when I worked with Microstock agencies I found that many of these images were not desirable.

Check with traditional agencies - lower priced agencies like Alamy have many documentary type photographs.  A search on Alamy under the term "homeless" returns over 23,800 results.

« Reply #2 on: February 11, 2013, 19:37 »
0
Thanks for your reply Ed. I know new microstock sites come and go but if one was created that wanted these kinds of images it's good to know there are photographers who already have these kinds of images in their catalog.

« Reply #3 on: February 11, 2013, 19:47 »
0
I've some images of this topics as well....and?

Tryingmybest

  • Stand up for what is right
« Reply #4 on: February 11, 2013, 20:15 »
0
If you're willing to consider illustrations...

http://www.shutterstock.com/sets/88413-people.html?rid=620377

http://www.shutterstock.com/sets/88415-religion.html?rid=620377

http://www.shutterstock.com/sets/537935-the-green-line.html?rid=620377

http://www.shutterstock.com/sets/88423-whitty-concepts.html?rid=620377

A lot of these sell in Asia, Mid-East, Africa and Latin America. I wrote an article about the importance and usefulness of including so-called minorities in every-day contexts, along with the travails of discrimination: http://blackrhinoillustration.blogspot.com/2010/12/creating-positive-images.html

I am collecting research on the availability of photos I can't seem to find very many of at most stock sites: candid shots of everyday people - minorities, homeless, low-income, developmentally challenged, etc. And if I do find some photos of minorities they're immaculate shiny happy people wearing white and perfectly composed. There aren't that many realistic photos out there - everything I find is posed, smiling and conceptually unbelievable.

I would like to know if you, as microstock photographers, ever take photos of these forgotten that you just haven't submitted to the current providers? Do you have a large catalog of these photos you want to submit but the current websites reject them?

Do you know there is a demand for this kind of diversity?

Would you shoot more of these kinds of models?

What are the issues you've encountered if you've tried it before?

Thanks!
Rana
« Last Edit: February 11, 2013, 20:20 by TheBlackRhino »

« Reply #5 on: February 11, 2013, 20:16 »
0
I've some images of this topics as well....and?

and...I'll add you to my list of potential contributors. Thanks m&m!

dbvirago

« Reply #6 on: February 11, 2013, 20:18 »
0
I have a few

« Reply #7 on: February 11, 2013, 20:21 »
0
When you guys say you have some, are we talking about tens, hundreds or thousands?

« Reply #8 on: February 11, 2013, 20:22 »
0
I have a few

Awesome I'll add you too. Thanks dbvirago!

« Reply #9 on: February 11, 2013, 20:23 »
0
Thanks The Black Rhino but for now I'm focusing on just photos. Vectors/illustrations possibly to come later.

If you're willing to consider illustrations...

http://www.shutterstock.com/sets/88413-people.html?rid=620377

http://www.shutterstock.com/sets/88415-religion.html?rid=620377

http://www.shutterstock.com/sets/537935-the-green-line.html?rid=620377

http://www.shutterstock.com/sets/88423-whitty-concepts.html?rid=620377

A lot of these sell in Asia, Mid-East, Africa and Latin America. I wrote an article about the importance and usefulness of including so-called minorities in every-day contexts, along with the travails of discrimination: http://blackrhinoillustration.blogspot.com/2010/12/creating-positive-images.html

I am collecting research on the availability of photos I can't seem to find very many of at most stock sites: candid shots of everyday people - minorities, homeless, low-income, developmentally challenged, etc. And if I do find some photos of minorities they're immaculate shiny happy people wearing white and perfectly composed. There aren't that many realistic photos out there - everything I find is posed, smiling and conceptually unbelievable.

I would like to know if you, as microstock photographers, ever take photos of these forgotten that you just haven't submitted to the current providers? Do you have a large catalog of these photos you want to submit but the current websites reject them?

Do you know there is a demand for this kind of diversity?

Would you shoot more of these kinds of models?

What are the issues you've encountered if you've tried it before?

Thanks!
Rana


« Reply #10 on: February 11, 2013, 20:31 »
+1
Great article! That is one of the reasons I am interested to see how many photos you all may have that you haven't submitted because the current agencies aren't interested in them and focus mainly on "white" photos. I am looking to change that and my first step is conducting research on what's available and what I have to commission.

Also I love that you're an organic gardener, I'm a greenie too! Happy to find a like-minded soul here. :)

If you're willing to consider illustrations...

http://www.shutterstock.com/sets/88413-people.html?rid=620377

http://www.shutterstock.com/sets/88415-religion.html?rid=620377

http://www.shutterstock.com/sets/537935-the-green-line.html?rid=620377

http://www.shutterstock.com/sets/88423-whitty-concepts.html?rid=620377

A lot of these sell in Asia, Mid-East, Africa and Latin America. I wrote an article about the importance and usefulness of including so-called minorities in every-day contexts, along with the travails of discrimination: http://blackrhinoillustration.blogspot.com/2010/12/creating-positive-images.html

I am collecting research on the availability of photos I can't seem to find very many of at most stock sites: candid shots of everyday people - minorities, homeless, low-income, developmentally challenged, etc. And if I do find some photos of minorities they're immaculate shiny happy people wearing white and perfectly composed. There aren't that many realistic photos out there - everything I find is posed, smiling and conceptually unbelievable.

I would like to know if you, as microstock photographers, ever take photos of these forgotten that you just haven't submitted to the current providers? Do you have a large catalog of these photos you want to submit but the current websites reject them?

Do you know there is a demand for this kind of diversity?

Would you shoot more of these kinds of models?

What are the issues you've encountered if you've tried it before?

Thanks!
Rana


Tryingmybest

  • Stand up for what is right
« Reply #11 on: February 11, 2013, 20:43 »
0
Thank you! Spread the word. I'm trying to get more folks to do the same.

Check out Scott Griessel's portfolio. He makes a lot of pix of Latin American people.

http://www.shutterstock.com/portfolio/search.mhtml?people_number=&commercial_ok=&search_cat=&searchterm=hispanic&people_ethnicity=&x=0&anyorall=all&y=0&color=&searchtermx=&photographer_name=CREATISTA&search_source=search_form&lang=en&version=llv1&search_group=&orient=&show_color_wheel=1&people_gender=&people_age=&submitter=102804&page=1&safesearch=1&sort_method=newest

Great article! That is one of the reasons I am interested to see how many photos you all may have that you haven't submitted because the current agencies aren't interested in them and focus mainly on "white" photos. I am looking to change that and my first step is conducting research on what's available and what I have to commission.

Also I love that you're an organic gardener, I'm a greenie too! Happy to find a like-minded soul here. :)

If you're willing to consider illustrations...

http://www.shutterstock.com/sets/88413-people.html?rid=620377

http://www.shutterstock.com/sets/88415-religion.html?rid=620377

http://www.shutterstock.com/sets/537935-the-green-line.html?rid=620377

http://www.shutterstock.com/sets/88423-whitty-concepts.html?rid=620377

A lot of these sell in Asia, Mid-East, Africa and Latin America. I wrote an article about the importance and usefulness of including so-called minorities in every-day contexts, along with the travails of discrimination: http://blackrhinoillustration.blogspot.com/2010/12/creating-positive-images.html

I am collecting research on the availability of photos I can't seem to find very many of at most stock sites: candid shots of everyday people - minorities, homeless, low-income, developmentally challenged, etc. And if I do find some photos of minorities they're immaculate shiny happy people wearing white and perfectly composed. There aren't that many realistic photos out there - everything I find is posed, smiling and conceptually unbelievable.

I would like to know if you, as microstock photographers, ever take photos of these forgotten that you just haven't submitted to the current providers? Do you have a large catalog of these photos you want to submit but the current websites reject them?

Do you know there is a demand for this kind of diversity?

Would you shoot more of these kinds of models?

What are the issues you've encountered if you've tried it before?

Thanks!
Rana



« Reply #12 on: February 11, 2013, 21:02 »
0
In course of covering political and civic events, I have collections of news photos that include diverse people participating in events such as this on news wire service, my own site, and alamy, but am I correct that you're referring to diverse models for commercial photos, rather than diverse people in editorial photos?
- Ann

« Reply #13 on: February 11, 2013, 21:16 »
0
I've some images of this topics as well....and?

and...I'll add you to my list of potential contributors. Thanks m&m!

Great, thank you.

« Reply #14 on: February 11, 2013, 21:38 »
0
One big problem is that such images need to be model released and the model needs to have a physical as well as an email address and a phone number.  Generally the types of people in the images you are describing don't have some or all of these things, so you can't submit the images.  For some sites you could do them as editorial, but they don't sell much.

ShadySue

  • There is a crack in everything
« Reply #15 on: February 11, 2013, 21:54 »
0
One big problem is that such images need to be model released and the model needs to have a physical as well as an email address and a phone number.  Generally the types of people in the images you are describing don't have some or all of these things, so you can't submit the images.  For some sites you could do them as editorial, but they don't sell much.
I was also wondering if the OP was thinking of editorial or commercial uses.

« Reply #16 on: February 12, 2013, 04:23 »
0
In course of covering political and civic events, I have collections of news photos that include diverse people participating in events such as this on news wire service, my own site, and alamy, but am I correct that you're referring to diverse models for commercial photos, rather than diverse people in editorial photos?
- Ann


You are correct Ann, I am referring to diverse models for commercial photos, not editorials. I am finding many other graphic designers in need of diversity in microstock for commercial use in printed materials. So, I am hoping that many of you already have large collections of these types of images so I will not have to commission photo shoots because that will take me longer to launch.


« Reply #17 on: February 12, 2013, 04:27 »
0
One big problem is that such images need to be model released and the model needs to have a physical as well as an email address and a phone number.  Generally the types of people in the images you are describing don't have some or all of these things, so you can't submit the images.  For some sites you could do them as editorial, but they don't sell much.

That is good to know, I hadn't thought about the address or phone number for the release. That is something I will have to work on as the images will be for commercial use. Thank you.

« Reply #18 on: March 09, 2013, 18:12 »
0
I just uploaded around 10 pictures like these ( model released ). I hope they are realistic enough and will sell well...

donding

  • Think before you speak
« Reply #19 on: March 09, 2013, 20:55 »
+1
I am collecting research on the availability of photos I can't seem to find very many of at most stock sites: candid shots of everyday people - minorities, homeless, low-income, developmentally challenged, etc. And if I do find some photos of minorities they're immaculate shiny happy people wearing white and perfectly composed. There aren't that many realistic photos out there - everything I find is posed, smiling and conceptually unbelievable.

I would like to know if you, as microstock photographers, ever take photos of these forgotten that you just haven't submitted to the current providers? Do you have a large catalog of these photos you want to submit but the current websites reject them?

Do you know there is a demand for this kind of diversity?

Would you shoot more of these kinds of models?

What are the issues you've encountered if you've tried it before?

Thanks!
Rana

I think the reason you don't find to many of these on stock sites is because they are not big sellers. Most people who buy stock photos, like those happy smiling people you refer to. Some people like the more realistic candid shots, but they are few and far between. Then you do run into the problem with model releases, especially with a homeless person. What is your intended use? You mentioned commercial, but in what context?

« Reply #20 on: March 09, 2013, 21:32 »
+3
For the past few years my #2 seller has been an image of myself. I'm something of a specialty item, being a transsexual woman and there are very few images of such on any stock agency. This doesn't surprise me at all as we're a very private group generally,  but I thought there might be some legitimate use such as, for example, a support agency producing a brochure. However with istocks recent Google Drive fiasco I wasn't prepared to let any models, including myself, face the risk of inappropriate use with no redress. Others may feel the same way about making images of 'sensitive' people be available for abuse.

« Reply #21 on: March 10, 2013, 04:33 »
+5
So the game plan is to get a large collection of unreleased stock photos of people in disadvantaged circumstances so that their misfortune can be used as the basis for commercial advertising, humilitating them in front of hundreds of thousands of people.

Sounds like the perfect one-stop shop for "no-win no-fee" lawyers, to me.   But, hey, I approve! What a great way of transferring money from those who have lots to those who are disadvantaged!

« Reply #22 on: March 10, 2013, 13:57 »
0
So the game plan is to get a large collection of unreleased stock photos of people in disadvantaged circumstances so that their misfortune can be used as the basis for commercial advertising, humilitating them in front of hundreds of thousands of people.

Sounds like the perfect one-stop shop for "no-win no-fee" lawyers, to me.   But, hey, I approve! What a great way of transferring money from those who have lots to those who are disadvantaged!
Completely agree - the only ethical way to produce these type of images is to use models and fake them.

« Reply #23 on: March 10, 2013, 16:07 »
+1
realimages of the disadvantaged are relatively low sellers and hard to get model released. Especially now that sites want addresses, e-mail, and phone numbers with the model releases.

In general shiny happy beautiful people pics sell better and so that is what the large producers produce.

People say they want real people images , but usually what they really want is perfect people that are pretending to be real people.


 

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