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Author Topic: Strategies for Free Usage Requests?  (Read 6580 times)

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PaulieWalnuts

  • On the Wrong Side of the Business
« on: May 10, 2015, 13:29 »
+9
Free usage. This came up in another post so I decided to start a new topic. Seems that creatives just give work away and that's just the way it goes. But lately I've been noticing a lot more ranting and backlash about it.

http://beezlystreet.com/2015/04/28/exposure-now-legal-tender-for-photographers - Does a pretty good job of showing how ridiculous it all is
http://petapixel.com/2012/01/10/this-photograph-is-not-free
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R2a8TRSgzZY - A classic
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mj5IV23g-fE - Harlan Ellison -- Pay the Writer (NSFW)

I get contacted constantly with requests for free usage, exchange for exposure, and other usually meaningless offers. Some creatives get angry and respond angrily. Some creatives ignore the requests. Some creatives just give-in and hand over their stuff for free. I don't do any of those. I respond politely but firmly and work toward getting them to pay. I think this industry as a whole needs to stop the freebies and move more toward an exchange of equal value. You don't give unless you get. And I mean money. Not exposure or credit. Not all people end up buying but a decent percentage do. You just need to politely say no and tell them what you're willing to accept.

Now if they're willing to offer something tangible I'd consider it. Maybe it's a new local restaurant and they're willing to offer $200 in gift cards to cover my $200 licensing fee. Great! But I've had restaurant owners propose I spend thousands of dollars out of my pocket for me to put prints in their restaurant because it's a "high traffic restaurant and would be great exposure for you". Hahahaaahhaaha, no. Here's a few examples of what has worked for me and this also applies to discount requests.

[The Make You Famous] Our super well-known company would like to use your image and we'll give you credit. This will be great exposure for you.
[Me] Sounds great. Using my images requires a very reasonable fee of $XX in addition to giving me credit. Would this work?

[The Small Broke Company] I'm starting up a small business and don't have any money but would like to use your image. 
[Me] Totally understand. I'm a small business too and my fees are affordable for any budget. That image is only $XX. Would that work?

[The Carrot] We'd like to use your image. We always hire photographers and will make sure to add you to our list for future work.
[Me] Sounds great. What I'd like to propose is you license the image for a very reasonable fee of $XX now and after that we can discuss discounts for future work.

How do you usually respond and what's worked for you?





ShadySue

« Reply #1 on: May 10, 2015, 13:36 »
+3
IME, people who approach you for free work can't/won't pay, and will just look elsewhere for free work.
If it's a charity I like, I might give work with some sort of RM licence; otherwise I don't waste time on them.

YMMV.

Fudio

« Reply #2 on: May 10, 2015, 14:02 »
+2
I just lie and tell them I'd love to help out but I'm contractually obligated by my agent to charge a minimum usage fee. Thankfully no one ever asks who my agent is.

« Reply #3 on: May 10, 2015, 14:03 »
+6
I thank them for their interest and tell them I do not give my art away for free.

ShadySue

« Reply #4 on: May 10, 2015, 14:28 »
+1
I just lie and tell them I'd love to help out but I'm contractually obligated by my agent to charge a minimum usage fee. Thankfully no one ever asks who my agent is.
I have pulled the 'iStock/Getty exclusive contract' line on occasion too, when I'm refusing a 'commercial entity', when approached by an acquaintance.

dpimborough

« Reply #5 on: May 10, 2015, 14:57 »
+3
What the heck is wrong with just saying NO!?

Why do photographers wet their knickers over whether to give stuff for free?

Free doesn't pay bills  ;D

Semmick Photo

« Reply #6 on: May 10, 2015, 15:09 »
+3
What the heck is wrong with just saying NO!?

Thats just not very business like. I think Paulie has it right, I also try and get them to pay. Mostly when they see the pricing on my website they purchase the image. Everyone can afford something between 2.50 and 17.50 euro.

PaulieWalnuts

  • On the Wrong Side of the Business
« Reply #7 on: May 10, 2015, 15:27 »
0
I just lie and tell them I'd love to help out but I'm contractually obligated by my agent to charge a minimum usage fee. Thankfully no one ever asks who my agent is.
I have pulled the 'iStock/Getty exclusive contract' line on occasion too, when I'm refusing a 'commercial entity', when approached by an acquaintance.

I use that too but I also am hoping to discourage them from even asking by letting them know this is my business and supports my family.

The only reason they ask in the first place is because creatives say yes. If creatives stopped saying yes people would stop asking.

PaulieWalnuts

  • On the Wrong Side of the Business
« Reply #8 on: May 10, 2015, 15:30 »
+1
What the heck is wrong with just saying NO!?

Why do photographers wet their knickers over whether to give stuff for free?

Free doesn't pay bills  ;D

You can say whatever you want but just plain no usually ends the opportunity for getting paid unless the person really wants your image. The "thanks, but" approach probably has better chances of getting paid.

« Reply #9 on: May 10, 2015, 15:41 »
+4
I wonder why I never get these requests ...

PaulieWalnuts

  • On the Wrong Side of the Business
« Reply #10 on: May 10, 2015, 15:45 »
+3
I wonder why I never get these requests ...

You're a celebrity.

dpimborough

« Reply #11 on: May 10, 2015, 16:32 »
0
What the heck is wrong with just saying NO!?

Why do photographers wet their knickers over whether to give stuff for free?

Free doesn't pay bills  ;D

You can say whatever you want but just plain no usually ends the opportunity for getting paid unless the person really wants your image. The "thanks, but" approach probably has better chances of getting paid.

My therapist says I have anger issues  :D

PaulieWalnuts

  • On the Wrong Side of the Business
« Reply #12 on: May 10, 2015, 16:53 »
0
What the heck is wrong with just saying NO!?

Why do photographers wet their knickers over whether to give stuff for free?

Free doesn't pay bills  ;D

You can say whatever you want but just plain no usually ends the opportunity for getting paid unless the person really wants your image. The "thanks, but" approach probably has better chances of getting paid.

My therapist says I have anger issues  :D

Use my approach and you won't need the therapist.   :)

« Reply #13 on: May 10, 2015, 20:46 »
+1
I agree with the "handle it matter of fact", polite, but firm approach. No need to get worked up. We're supposed to be professionals. I recently had a free request. I thanked them for their interest in my work, said that as a struggling artist I couldn't afford to give away my work for free and provided a link where to purchase the file for a reasonable price. I thought I'd never hear from them again but to my surprise they did buy the file (smallest size, ha!).

« Reply #14 on: May 10, 2015, 23:33 »
+1
I have such requests too. Never ignore. Such people should have clear no for free usage and i have a text to paste in e-mail to not waste my time. I don't close the doors, they are invited to return, when they decide to buy. Why i do this? One person told that he will find the same image for free in internet and use it. I think one minute to send a canned answer is better than ignoring

« Reply #15 on: May 11, 2015, 19:44 »
+1
In general you should never work for free.
For me, the only exceptions can be for family or a charity I know and trust.
And even then there is a limit.
When I first started in the advertising business a lot of agencies did spec work but fortunately that has changed.
However, there are still a lot of slimeballs out there who will ask you to work for free because it will be "great exposure for you" and "it will lead to more work down the line".
Don't listen to these creeps. You will never see a dime from them.
The return per image is already low enough in Microstock. Don't start giving your work away for free.

Still unsure? Check out this handy flow chart created by Jessica Hische: http://shouldiworkforfree.com

« Reply #16 on: May 11, 2015, 19:51 »
+2
The best response ever to a request for free work is by David Thorne over at 27b/6:

http://www.27bslash6.com/p2p2.html


« Reply #17 on: May 11, 2015, 20:13 »
+4
The best response ever to a request for free work is by David Thorne over at 27b/6:

http://www.27bslash6.com/p2p2.html


This is a my favorite from David:
http://www.27bslash6.com/missy.html

« Reply #18 on: May 11, 2015, 20:20 »
0
that is priceless

i too would rather take a more genteel approach, but in this case he had already done work for free ,so he had it coming

Uncle Pete

« Reply #19 on: May 11, 2015, 21:16 »
+2
Thorne links: yaght

Time to say good-bye.

I suspect these fit the conclusion that humor and sarcasm are lost on the web. Nice work David Thorne.

Free work:

I think the answer is here from various viewpoints. Give a polite answer that you can't afford to work for free, but if they would offer a payment relative to the work and distribution, you could negotiate a fair price. Ask for details of the project so you can give an estimate of what it would cost.

If they decide to go away, it's their decision. At least you left the door open for an offer of realistic payment.

Hobostocker

    This user is banned.
« Reply #20 on: May 12, 2015, 03:23 »
+2
exposure is not the issue, the issue is that you won't get any proper exposure or tangible benefits from these fly by night operations.





« Reply #21 on: May 12, 2015, 09:23 »
+3
Exposure via paid work is better than exposure via free work. At least in my book.

« Reply #22 on: May 12, 2015, 10:13 »
-3
my reply to freebie is simple. i recall the time when i was training with a professional studio photographer from NYC who was one of those who "interned" with Ansel Adams when he was working with Polaroid . his answer was simply, when you give your skill away free, you are saying to the world you are not good enough to be paid. he also related to me how they too had simply overlooked many free seminars for the same reason. or more so, not wish to let the professionals cheapen themselves . crassly stated, "even prostitutes have more self-pride than you, if you give yourself away for free. you become like the class-slut who gives herself away free".

« Reply #23 on: May 12, 2015, 10:33 »
+5
if you give yourself away for free. you become like the class-slut who gives herself away free".

I object to the word slut. it reeks of Misogyny. In this day and age, women are just as free to express their sexuality as men.
« Last Edit: May 12, 2015, 11:06 by rimglow »

« Reply #24 on: May 12, 2015, 10:58 »
0
The best response ever to a request for free work is by David Thorne over at 27b/6:

http://www.27bslash6.com/p2p2.html


This is a my favorite from David:
http://www.27bslash6.com/missy.html


Some of those email exchanges are really hilarious. His deft skill in deflecting the point being made by the other party puts me in mind of some email exchanges I've had with Contributor Relations departments, although theirs are not nearly as clever or funny.

« Reply #25 on: May 12, 2015, 12:05 »
-5
if you give yourself away for free. you become like the class-slut who gives herself away free".

I object to the word slut. it reeks of Misogyny. In this day and age, women are just as free to express their sexuality as men.

even in this day and age, a slut by any other name won't smell any sweeter 8)
women today still use that word to describe such a girl/woman who gives herself away free.

Hobostocker

    This user is banned.
« Reply #26 on: May 12, 2015, 12:50 »
-3
if you give yourself away for free. you become like the class-slut who gives herself away free".

I object to the word slut. it reeks of Misogyny. In this day and age, women are just as free to express their sexuality as men.

even in this day and age, a slut by any other name won't smell any sweeter 8)
women today still use that word to describe such a girl/woman who gives herself away free.

maybe it's me but i keep hearing the word Slut a lot more often from girls rather than men.



« Reply #27 on: May 12, 2015, 13:00 »
-1
if you give yourself away for free. you become like the class-slut who gives herself away free".

I object to the word slut. it reeks of Misogyny. In this day and age, women are just as free to express their sexuality as men.

even in this day and age, a slut by any other name won't smell any sweeter 8)
women today still use that word to describe such a girl/woman who gives herself away free.

Are you suggesting you prefer women who charge money?

Back on topic, I think Paulies method of trying to turn a freebie request into a sale is best.  I generally thank them for their interest in my work, explain this is my job and the way I support my family, and then send them a link to the same image on my own website. Only rarely I ever hear back from them and even rarer I get a sale, but at least I didn't give it away.

I also did charity work for years.  At first they were very grateful, and sometimes gave me gift cards or thank you cards.  But after a few years, they were too demanding.   They demanded I work on their schedule, do reshoots, complain if the images didn't get processed and to them fast enough, and NEVER anymore thanks.  I just recently told them I  hated doing the work and was done.  They were so surprised!  'But we are a charity!'  BAH.
« Last Edit: May 12, 2015, 13:02 by PixelBytes »

« Reply #28 on: May 12, 2015, 14:26 »
+1
When I was an undergrad I played in a brass quintet.  It was fun and good experience but we were mostly doing it to make some extra money.  We occasionally played a free concert for promotion but mainly did weddings and churches.  When anyone asked, we repeated the same mantra, "no pay, no play".  Some of the church people got kind of upset and thought we should play for free, but we told them sorry, we would only do it for money.  Our prices were very reasonable so they usually hired us.  We never did do a free gig while I was a member.  I'm not about to start now!

Hobostocker

    This user is banned.
« Reply #29 on: May 12, 2015, 15:18 »
0
They were so surprised!  'But we are a charity!'  BAH.

that's why the big NGOs only hire professionals, look at the job posting for UN, Unesco, ILO, WHO, USAID, Care Internaltional, WorldVision ... sometimes they even seek people with two degrees and a master or PhD ! they're true multinationals and even the few volunteer positions are given to people with a strong background and/or experience in the field.

the only charities paying nothing are the fly by night NGOs doing the "dirty job" that the big ones refuse to mess with, so they end up in these so called "umbrella orgs" etc etc ... most of them being a total scam from top to bottom.

all i can say is stay away from these crooks.


ShadySue

« Reply #30 on: May 12, 2015, 17:25 »
0
the only charities paying nothing are the fly by night NGOs doing the "dirty job" that the big ones refuse to mess with, so they end up in these so called "umbrella orgs" etc etc ... most of them being a total scam from top to bottom.
So not true. I've worked with small charities and causes who are funded entirely by their volunteers, who also give up hours to put in the necessary work. And bake, design posters and turn up for coffee mornings.
Also I've been offered expenses by bigger charities, but I think, "who needs this money more, (e.g.) someone who needs an overnight cancer nurse, or me?" (Disclaimer: no-one else is financially dependent on me.)

« Reply #31 on: May 12, 2015, 22:47 »
+2
They were so surprised!  'But we are a charity!'  BAH.

that's why the big NGOs only hire professionals, look at the job posting for UN, Unesco, ILO, WHO, USAID, Care Internaltional, WorldVision ... sometimes they even seek people with two degrees and a master or PhD ! they're true multinationals and even the few volunteer positions are given to people with a strong background and/or experience in the field.

the only charities paying nothing are the fly by night NGOs doing the "dirty job" that the big ones refuse to mess with, so they end up in these so called "umbrella orgs" etc etc ... most of them being a total scam from top to bottom.

all i can say is stay away from these crooks.

The charity I was doing work for was a small local charity.  They didn't have the money to hire.  My problem became when as time passed they became more and more demanding and seemed to forget I am donating my time just like other volunteers.  If you want people to volunteer, you at least need to treat them with respect, and also not overburden them to the point they can hardly have time for their paid work. 

Hobostocker

    This user is banned.
« Reply #32 on: May 13, 2015, 04:47 »
+1
So not true. I've worked with small charities and causes who are funded entirely by their volunteers, who also give up hours to put in the necessary work. And bake, design posters and turn up for coffee mornings.
Also I've been offered expenses by bigger charities, but I think, "who needs this money more, (e.g.) someone who needs an overnight cancer nurse, or me?" (Disclaimer: no-one else is financially dependent on me.)

it's all a give and take, if volunteering makes you happy there's nothing wrong with it.

problem is, while this might be the situation for some small NGOs in the West it's not the reality in the third world where the crooks leading the NGOs are making 6 figures while their volunteers are treated like sh-it or they even pay 1000s of dollars to go there ("voluntourism" !!) ...

it's just too easy for a non-profit to turn into a very profitable business, too many temptations and too many gullible volunteers willing to fly overseas to "save the world" ... i really hope the Orgs you joined were a decent place and i could also recommend the Red Cross if that matters but they're all kept in their place because in the West there's still some justice and many laws to follow, anywhere else it's totally Wild West .. i can't imagine the billions pouring in the pockets of the NGO who are now asking left and right for money to save Kathmandu and Nepal .. especialy considering the level of corruption in Nepal and all the sh-it i've seen there done by the NGOs years ago.

Hobostocker

    This user is banned.
« Reply #33 on: May 13, 2015, 04:54 »
+1
My problem became when as time passed they became more and more demanding and seemed to forget I am donating my time just like other volunteers.  If you want people to volunteer, you at least need to treat them with respect, and also not overburden them to the point they can hardly have time for their paid work.

they won't give any respect as volunteers are taken for granted and if they complain they will receive a motivational speech to get back to work ... typically about the concept of saving the world, of giving something (time, money, dedication), blah blah blah .. moral of the story you give them something and they give you nothing back and if you don't like it you'll be told you're an egoist greedy individualistic blah blah blah and that it's because of people like you that this world cannot be changed etc etc ..


ShadySue

« Reply #34 on: May 13, 2015, 05:50 »
+2
The charity I was doing work for was a small local charity.  They didn't have the money to hire.  My problem became when as time passed they became more and more demanding and seemed to forget I am donating my time just like other volunteers.  If you want people to volunteer, you at least need to treat them with respect, and also not overburden them to the point they can hardly have time for their paid work.
I agree totally. I've been pretty lucky with those I've chosen to be involved with. For example, the charity I'm a volunteer photographer with advertised and took on three vol. togs. at the same time, and there isn't a vast amount of work needing done each year between the three of us. They seem to be really mindful of volunteer's time. For example, I also signed up additionally to do can rattling and this year they sent out the dates and I had quite a few I was free on, and they were really nearby, so I sent in all my dates, and I was allocated only 3 x 2hr stints (they do a lot of recruiting to make sure no-one gets overburdened). But that is a big and very well-known charity.

Sometimes, people are just inconsiderate, like you experienced.

Sometimes, the existing volunteers are 100% committed (maybe retired/no family etc) and give phenomenal amounts of time and effort, forgetting that others may still need to make a living, or have other commitments for their time and energy.
« Last Edit: May 13, 2015, 06:21 by ShadySue »

« Reply #35 on: May 13, 2015, 08:08 »
+2
I used to write for diving magazines and make pretty good money, more if I got a main story and more depending on whether they used my photos. Not too long ago I got $900 for one time use full page (not cover).

That being said those days are gone for me.  I get emails now and then (just got one recently from a non-profit) asking for me to support the "endangered this and endangered that" by donating certain images.  I respond like Paulie that I am non profit and small business and have overhead. 

One of the VERY frustrating things is I recently saw a two-page spread using one of my images in a dive magazine called Dive Training. No credits, nothing. They made it look like the the author shot that image, so I contacted them to politely ask where they got the image and why they don't put in credits.  No response. I escalated it, no response. I used my contacts and no response.  I threatened to get an attorney involved and not only no response but clears my posts on their FB page. So I think I hit a nerve and exposed what they always do....put images that aren't the authors under the authors name and not credit them.  While this isn't illegal if they purchased the image properly, it is shady.

The moral of that story is that they probably purchased the image from SS or somewhere where I made peanuts in comparison to the $900.  No more requests, they just pay $1 and they have my image.

ShadySue

« Reply #36 on: May 13, 2015, 08:36 »
+1
^^^
iStock requires (or did, I haven't looked today!) that editorial uses (not just ediotiral images) are accredited author/istockphoto, but I've found that at least half of my editorial in-uses are not credited.
Always makes me wonder how many other site conditions (e.g. ELs, not 'stock-piling') are just being ignored.

It's certainly even worse if they are implying that someone else made the images.

(I once had a couple of my iStock pics on a website marked 'copyright website', i.e. theirs, not even iStock. Some other pics there were credited to various people 'copyright XX, CreativeCommons) I did take that up with iStock's CR/CE, and a while later, noticed that my images were removed from the site. You don't really get detailled feedback from CE, so I never knew whether the images had been 'lifted' from a legitimate buyer's site, or if they just decided they weren't going to credit pics they had paid for.
« Last Edit: May 13, 2015, 08:39 by ShadySue »


PaulieWalnuts

  • On the Wrong Side of the Business
« Reply #37 on: May 13, 2015, 09:39 »
+6
I recently had a non-profit company contact me for free usage. The email was very entitled like "love your work (always starts that way), we're a non-profit, internal use, need high-res image immediately", etc. I sent them a polite response with just a link to istock for the measly few dollars. They responded back offended in big text "Sorry, I think you misunderstood, this link is to make a purchase???". I looked the company up and checked out the financial report. A half billion dollars in revenue. And they won't pay a few dollars for an image. After going back and forth a couple times they offered credit, exposure, and potential work in the future. No thanks. Not my kind of client. So I guess they get all of their office furniture, corporate office lease, computers, business supplies, internet service, and everything else for free. And they must not pay their employees. The person that called me must spend 40 hours per week working for free.

I also love the entitled "personal use" people. "No wait, it's not commercial use, just personal use so why would I pay for that? I just want to [use it to make a print, have it as computer wallpaper, use it make wedding invitations, etc]". Oh I see, it's for personal use. Why didn't you say so? I can go to Apple or Amazon when I need to download a song and just tell them it's for personal use and I get it for free right? Gas stations give free gas if it's for personal use. Camera companies don't charge for equipment if it's for personal use. Here I'll tell you what. I'll do the same thing Amazon and Apple do when they let you listen to a station for free. I will let you see the image for free. Just go to my website and you can look at it as long as you want. In fact , you can look at all of the images as often as you want. No charge.

Shelma1

« Reply #38 on: May 13, 2015, 09:58 »
+4
I've worked for too many non-profits (I was well paid) and have seen the high salaries, the beautiful homes the marketing people live in, the all-expenses-paid trips to tropical locales for conferences, etc., to ever give my work to any of them for free. Believe me, they have big marketing budgets and pay for photography and illustration all the time. Don't be a sucker.

« Reply #39 on: May 13, 2015, 14:40 »
0
It's funny because I was just thinking about this topic last night.

So, last week I did softball posters for the local chamber, they're doing a charity. The proceeds go to support the shop with a cop program. I cut them a deal and charged $70 for the poster and a single color graphic for shirts (for some reason, softball tournaments do really well here ... I found out today that they ended up with 8 teams, at $250 bucks a peice my measly $70 seems pretty miniscule)

In November the city hosts a "homeshow" (basically showing off people's decorated homes) and collected like $15 per ticket or something, the proceeds go to support that same program, as well as some other charitable bs. I spent like twice as much time designing the signs for the stupid "homeshow" and charged them nothing. The logic ...

That said, I do frequently use free image sources as well for my blog, designs and whatever but, when needed haven't been afraid to pay for imagery (especially when that means handing the bill down the line). I would think that most businesses/non-profits would understand that this is our business and while sometimes you can get/give a deal ... it shouldn't be expected.

PaulieWalnuts

  • On the Wrong Side of the Business
« Reply #40 on: May 13, 2015, 15:48 »
0
This wasn't a charity. It was a big business non-profit. I do review charities that contact me and will send them prints for auctions. Some prints have sold for good amounts and I like to do that type of stuff. But it seems like some non-profits like to communicate like non-profit equals charity which is deceptive. There are plenty of non-profit associations that are massive influential businesses and have nothing to do with charity.

ShadySue

« Reply #41 on: May 13, 2015, 16:21 »
+1
This wasn't a charity. It was a big business non-profit. ...
Thanks for that.
Every time this topic comes up, I'm left wondering if 'non-profit' is what the US calls a charity (they're different here/UK). Comments in threads seem to use the terms interchangeably.
Clearly they are also different in the US.
« Last Edit: May 13, 2015, 17:01 by ShadySue »

PaulieWalnuts

  • On the Wrong Side of the Business
« Reply #42 on: May 13, 2015, 17:37 »
+3
This wasn't a charity. It was a big business non-profit. ...
Thanks for that.
Every time this topic comes up, I'm left wondering if 'non-profit' is what the US calls a charity (they're different here/UK). Comments in threads seem to use the terms interchangeably.
Clearly they are also different in the US.

In the US we tend to blur the lines between nonprofit and charity but they clearly have different purposes. Charities who have approached me normally identify themselves as a charitable organization who are contacting me for a specific fund-raising activity such as an auction to raise money for pediatric cancer care. I usually will send something to them as a donation. Non-profits have only contacted me to ask for something free and tout the "oh-woah-is-me we're a non-profit" like that automatically means "we don't make any money and can't pay you so give us free stuff" which isn't the case. I've worked with non-profits in other business dealings and they normally have plenty of budget if you don't let them take advantage of you.

ShadySue

« Reply #43 on: May 13, 2015, 17:57 »
+1
^^ Thanks for the amplification.
The two are pretty much demarcated here, as charities have to be registered and approved and are pretty strictly regulated: one of the qualifications being how much of the income received actually goes to the cause rather than staff expenses, fundraising/education etc. Generally any expenditure, no matter how small, is picked over in detail at the annual meeting, with questions being raised about whether it could have been got cheaper or free. It's true that with the bigger charities, some staff are well paid, but they normally have very specialist jobs, like legal or lobbying parliament / hobnobbing with royalty or stuff like that. Even at that, I've seen volunteer vacancies for part time legal consultants, electricians, builders, secretarial help etc etc. It's definitely not just creatives.

Hobostocker

    This user is banned.
« Reply #44 on: May 14, 2015, 05:20 »
+2
the high salaries, the beautiful homes the marketing people live in, the all-expenses-paid trips to tropical locales for conferences, etc., to ever give my work to any of them for free. Believe me, they have big marketing budgets and pay for photography and illustration all the time. Don't be a sucker.

EXACTLY the same i've seen so far.







Shelma1

« Reply #45 on: May 14, 2015, 06:12 »
0
A response to request from one photographer, with the classic video "pay the writer:"

http://tomasvh.com/response-to-requests-for-free-use-of-photography/

« Reply #46 on: May 15, 2015, 06:07 »
+1


ShadySue

« Reply #47 on: May 15, 2015, 06:14 »
+1
Be Careful When a Big Brand Asks for Your Photo

http://petapixel.com/2015/05/14/be-careful-when-a-big-brand-asks-for-your-photo/


So MillerLite wanted use the image on a television commercial but didn't ask for  releases?
H*ll, as you say: "Be careful".
I wouldn't even consider giving a 'big brand' a pic to use on their fan page/whatever.
« Last Edit: May 15, 2015, 06:26 by ShadySue »

Fudio

« Reply #48 on: May 15, 2015, 06:18 »
+1
Be Careful When a Big Brand Asks for Your Photo

http://petapixel.com/2015/05/14/be-careful-when-a-big-brand-asks-for-your-photo/


Totally understandable. A fledgling company like SABMiller can hardly be expected to pay for promotional material.

Hobostocker

    This user is banned.
« Reply #49 on: May 16, 2015, 02:37 »
0
Be Careful When a Big Brand Asks for Your Photo

http://petapixel.com/2015/05/14/be-careful-when-a-big-brand-asks-for-your-photo/


Totally understandable. A fledgling company like SABMiller can hardly be expected to pay for promotional material.


well, a marketer would tell you to "jump on this opportunity" .. and to contact other big clients with SABmiller in your portfolio ... problem is, marketers tend to be out of touch with reality and clients won't maybe give a sh-it about your CV anyway as they tend to hire creatives just because they've been recommended by other insiders in the industry, in short there's zero guarantee that a CV filled with big famous brands translates in future assignment opportunities.




 

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