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Author Topic: Would Like to Hear From Older submitters.  (Read 621 times)

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« on: February 22, 2020, 01:19 »
+2
Not Older in Age especially But how Long you Have been active doing "Microstock" and also Not how Long your doing General Stock Period as General Stock goes Back a very long time 80/100+ Years or More and Originated with Travel, Flowers [Yes Flowers]

 How are ya Doing???? and the early "Stock" shooters were writers also and able to explain to the viewer exactly what,Why and Where. Very few Have that Talent today or for at Least the Last 30/40 Years as In the early Life magazines and Nat Geographic taking Us around the world every Month with Images and words which Is where it was Instilled in Me to be Like them. I would Like to read about in your short time How things have changed......For many Of us and the few 1000 That gave up or just don't post anymore and it seems every Month, More and More are Leaving.The rest are Just saying and repeating Samo Over and Over.

This was inevitable My friends and some of us saw the writing On the wall a Long time ago. 2011/2012 and Many Of us think it's a waste of time to even consider doing this at the level we were.......Negative? Ya and Honest.
 There Is a Man who I believe is One of the Best writers ever about this Business and Photography in General Going Forward.
He doesn't Mince words and says it Like it is for Many Years. He is a Must Read My Friends, It's Not stock related But reality Related and centers On Image Making.
The good news IMHO is still and always has been......Client work But with That comes the term "doing the work" which Means more Now than Before and it also Means Those who want this....Really want this Better settle down and Become businessmen and women and a Lot More Creative.
I wrote a Long Piece in 2006 that in 10 Years Cellphone work will Take Over for a 20 gazillion folks that didn't know . I just Bought a New Iphone 11 and a few apps. Simply Amazing quality. Read this fellow then tell me How much you think you Know.

I start at Jan 2020. it goes back many Years. It is not stock Centered But The business Of Photography as a Job.
Enjoy....http://blog.melchersystem.com/the-things-that-kill-themselves/


« Reply #1 on: February 22, 2020, 03:52 »
+1
I would draw a parallel with Music...there is no longer value in the music that is available mostly free. Physical presence counts such as concerts people even pay to shake hands with their heroes ;) The situation has reveresed from when the concert was a means of marketing records.

So the money is in training/workshops event photography...any  thing that requires human presence.

Kodak tried to maintain the value of their product by resisting change they were flattened.

« Reply #2 on: February 22, 2020, 05:26 »
+4
I started microstock in 2006.  I felt the first start of the decline in 2013, which was exactly 1 year after quitting my day job.  But as a true pessimist, I added a portrait studio to my stock photography work, "just in case" stock would go down.  The biggest falls happened in 2016 and 2019.  I am now at 40% of my best year (which was 2012).  But the portrait studio is going excellent and has grown to be 2x my stock income, so no worry.  I have specialized in a maternity studio (belly/newborns) and love what I do.
I stopped shooting stock, or better said :  since starting the portrait studio I don't do typical "stock shoots" anymore, but I do submit images shot during my holidays/travels and sometimes newborn baby images if I want to offer parents a free session with Model Release.
The future?  I expect my stock income to become non-existant by 2024, but still "no worry" because I'll be retired by then  :)
It's not just the agencies that ruined our market share by accepting too many images, I'm sure I am also guilty because I stopped shooting FOR the market.  However, I can see that my income is mainly coming from older images, so I can only conclude that the drowning of new photos is the absolute no.1 reason why stock has returned to the hobby-status and can no longer be a fulltime job.

« Reply #3 on: February 22, 2020, 05:40 »
+2
Well I took my first stock shots in 2009 though didn't really start commiting to stock until 2012.

My high water mark was 2018 but it's literally collapsed by 50% since and now I make less than I did back in 2014 even though I added more and more of better quality and always did research on shooting subjects.

Thanks to Shutterstock's idiotic acceptance policies and of course iStock/Getty who I left in 2017 once the penny and sub-penny royalties kicked in.

I did dabble in video but even though that market is becoming saturated and the so-called agencies are leading a race to the bottom on video prices I think I'll spend more time on video as its the only way to keep the money coming to pay for the essentials like food and rent.

I live in a rural area where job opportunities are scarce unlike city dwellers I rely on stock to pay for the cost of living.

I was also disgusted to see Shutterstock banned you Laurin from the forum seeing as you and Dave spent so much time on the forum giving free advice.

You put up with so many insults over the years from the wannabes and trolls.
« Last Edit: February 22, 2020, 10:16 by Bad Robot »

« Reply #4 on: February 22, 2020, 06:48 »
+2
Started in 2009 and it took a straight nose dive in the Summer of 2013 and hasn't recovered.  I haven't submitted an image in about 2 years anywhere because of it.  Why put in all that work to not get any return back on your time, energy and money invested.  I've just been letting them sit there and take payout from places when I get to the minimum threshold.  I used to make payout on Shutterstock every month now it takes me 2-3 months just to reach that $35 minimum.

I've gone into other avenues of work (aside from my full time job) making music, audio engineering, making knit and crochet patterns and, if I'm desperate, click work.  I never viewed this as a full time income but a supplemental one to my job.  Just a way to make some extra money to set aside for emergencies or save up for a big purchase.  Now I can't even do that and I know I'm not the only one and that sucks.

« Reply #5 on: February 22, 2020, 08:40 »
+2
Started in 2008. 

I'm still in, but it's no longer my main thing. 

I still enjoy photography, and prefer selling through markets over direct to individuals. 

My main income now is from fabric and R-rated coloring books.

unseengallery.com

« Reply #6 on: February 23, 2020, 19:08 »
+3
Also started in 2006. My income continues to rise. Not going anywhere while that lasts.




« Reply #7 on: February 23, 2020, 20:41 »
+1
Started in 2004. Still have an active account at Adobe, but not actively uploading for the last 3 or 4 years. For the buyer, microstock is still alive. For the contributor, not so much. Some still do well, most do not.

« Reply #8 on: February 23, 2020, 22:28 »
+1
Been at it for around 12 years.  Earning grew exponentially for 5 or 6 years, held steady for a few, and have been sliding ever since.  I have cut my uploads by around 75%.  It looks like I may have leveled out and my earnings may now be holding steady.  Down around 30% from my peak, but well worth spending around 30-60 minutes a day for a near 6-figure passive income.  Still helping put my kids through college and I'm hoping it will help me retire about 5 years earlier than I might without it.


 

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