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Author Topic: 4K vs HD  (Read 3834 times)

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« Reply #25 on: May 16, 2019, 07:40 »
+1

If you're a contributor and looking to get into video acquisition, you'd be silly to purchase anything other than a 4k camera.  They're just dirt cheap. 

I've been shooting HD stock video with my 3 original Canon 7D cameras, which are really old now, and I know I need to upgrade soon. Also have a great collection of L lenses so don't want to change brand.

I've been waiting for the 7Diii but there's no sign of it yet. (I missed the 7Dii which is now discontinued.)

Can anybody recommend a Canon 4K camera that works well for wildlife? "Dirt cheap" would be nice but not expected.  :)

Thanks in advance for suggestions.

I was much in the same boat.  I've been (and continue to be) a loyal Canon user and happened to have the same 7d that you talk about.  Given my role, I knew it was time for a better camera with regards to video and waited for about 2 years in the hopes that Canon would release a mid-tier camera that didn't compromise on video that much.  If you want Canon and only Canon, I think the EOS-R is a good camera, mirrorless with decent but not spectacular 4k results. 

For myself, after much hand wringing, I decided to go for the Sony A7 III and the metabones V adapter.  If you're shooting manual, you're golden.  If you shoot P mode, it's not bad and the metabones v60 software does a pretty good job of giving you things like AF and so forth.  4k video is pristine and easy to get to.

Biggest change on the photo side will be that your lenses don't act the same because you switched to a full-frame sensor.  I used to work almost entirely with a EF28-70 macro and with the 1.6 crop factor could reach out enough to get a decent shot.  Now, I am strapping on the EF70-200 f/4 and wanting more distance!

In the end, any camera you get today is going to do a good job for both photo and in most cases video.  Just do your homework first.

Hope this helps,
Dennis


« Reply #26 on: May 16, 2019, 09:18 »
+1
I understand that this is mainly a photographers powered forum.
But just for reference, camcorders, also do shoot video!

Really!

:P

An one inch (type) sensor camcorders shooting 4K from Sony AX100/700
to Canon xc10/15 or Legria GX10 or XF 400 or (smaller sensor) newcoming XA40,
or Panasonic or JVC solutions sound as a safe solution assuming that one
keep all "HD" "old" dslr bodies and expensive glass for photography
and just invest 2000-4000$ for a camcorder that can also cover events
or just small productions or whatever up to 1080 120fps or 4K 30 to 60 fps
as long as a mirroless body, a metabones plus a monitor & some audio equipment
are at the same price range...

Just an alternative.

SpaceStockFootage

  • Space, Sci-Fi and Astronomy Related Stock Footage

« Reply #27 on: May 17, 2019, 10:44 »
+1
I recently bought a Sony AX100. 4K at 24 or 30fps, 1080 at 60fps (I think it does 120fps at 720p as well... still learning!), a 1" sensor, 100Mbps bitrate, built in ND filters, zebras, peaking, audio in, control it remotely with your phone, decent zoom and some pretty impressive video quality... what's not to like?! Picked it up reconditioned for $1250.

One of the first shots I took with it...


« Reply #28 on: May 17, 2019, 11:09 »
+2
I recently bought a Sony AX100. 4K at 24 or 30fps, 1080 at 60fps (I think it does 120fps at 720p as well... still learning!), a 1" sensor, 100Mbps bitrate, built in ND filters, zebras, peaking, audio in, control it remotely with your phone, decent zoom and some pretty impressive video quality... what's not to like?! Picked it up reconditioned for $1250.

One of the first shots I took with it...

Watch those blown out highlights... If there aren't any flat profiles on that camera, mess around with the contrast settings (generally as low as it goes) to maximize the performance of the small sensor.

Built in ND filters is truly a great thing though!

« Reply #29 on: May 17, 2019, 11:23 »
0
You got a good deal then! Wishes for happy filming! :)

Just an offtopic comment, 1 inch sensor camcorders (all brands)
are actually smaller than one inch, their full name is "1 inch type".

NDs and the option to use XLRK2M audio unit. It is priceless to appear in public with a simple bulky "consumer" body
and in an event with the same body and α shotgun mic plus a second XLR ready to get whatever audio needed.

On a bright day, you could zoom more to the two monkey faces with the little sister AX53 20x optical zoom.
Guess no one would notice the difference 4K 24/30 @100Mbps.

« Reply #30 on: May 17, 2019, 12:25 »
0

If you're a contributor and looking to get into video acquisition, you'd be silly to purchase anything other than a 4k camera.  They're just dirt cheap. 

I've been shooting HD stock video with my 3 original Canon 7D cameras, which are really old now, and I know I need to upgrade soon. Also have a great collection of L lenses so don't want to change brand.

I've been waiting for the 7Diii but there's no sign of it yet. (I missed the 7Dii which is now discontinued.)

Can anybody recommend a Canon 4K camera that works well for wildlife? "Dirt cheap" would be nice but not expected.  :)

Thanks in advance for suggestions.

I was much in the same boat.  I've been (and continue to be) a loyal Canon user and happened to have the same 7d that you talk about.  Given my role, I knew it was time for a better camera with regards to video and waited for about 2 years in the hopes that Canon would release a mid-tier camera that didn't compromise on video that much.  If you want Canon and only Canon, I think the EOS-R is a good camera, mirrorless with decent but not spectacular 4k results. 

For myself, after much hand wringing, I decided to go for the Sony A7 III and the metabones V adapter.  If you're shooting manual, you're golden.  If you shoot P mode, it's not bad and the metabones v60 software does a pretty good job of giving you things like AF and so forth.  4k video is pristine and easy to get to.

Biggest change on the photo side will be that your lenses don't act the same because you switched to a full-frame sensor.  I used to work almost entirely with a EF28-70 macro and with the 1.6 crop factor could reach out enough to get a decent shot.  Now, I am strapping on the EF70-200 f/4 and wanting more distance!

In the end, any camera you get today is going to do a good job for both photo and in most cases video.  Just do your homework first.

Hope this helps,
Dennis

Dennis, thank you so much for that detailed answer!

I'm keeping my eyes on the "Canon rumors" websites and, based on new developments being reported, still hope that a 7D iii may yet make its appearance later this year. (Or a merged 7D and 80D, which may be the final product.) That's really the camera I want, so I'm willing to wait for it.

But if it doesn't materialize by the end of this year, I'll have to get something else, because my 10-year-old 7Ds are getting a bit cranky even tho they still work for what I'm currently doing.

Again, thank you.

SpaceStockFootage

  • Space, Sci-Fi and Astronomy Related Stock Footage

« Reply #31 on: May 17, 2019, 13:37 »
+1
That was pretty zoomed in anyway, but I've got a 1080p crop of it as well, without the bright rock action!


 

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