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Author Topic: How much to charge?  (Read 8578 times)

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« on: July 08, 2010, 16:08 »
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I was contacted by a friend of mine that owns a large furniture store locally. He knows that I know my way around a camera a bit and wanted to set up a studio in his warehouse to photograph his furniture for his website. He saw a competitor's website where all of the furniture was isolated on white and wants that look as well.

I met with him today to see how much space was available and other logistics. What we came up with was the following:
    1 - I will put together a "shopping list" for him including lights, camera, construction materials, etc.
    2 - I will be on location while the electrician installs lighting to ensure proper placement
    3 - I will be on location while the carpenter installs the curve between the wall and the floor
    4 - I will mark out on the floor where tripod will be located and rough locations for furniture during shooting
    5 - I will go to his location to set up the camera and create a small training manual (camera settings mostly)
    6 - I will go to his location to train one or more of his employees to take the photos in the completed studio

After that, my job is finished. What would you guys charge for something like that? He asked me for a number, but I didn't want to jump the gun, so to speak.

TIA for your input!


WarrenPrice

« Reply #1 on: July 08, 2010, 16:18 »
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Do need or would you like to have access to the studio?  Maybe a trade?

« Reply #2 on: July 08, 2010, 16:19 »
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7 - I will never, ever do something like this again.

« Reply #3 on: July 08, 2010, 16:49 »
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At first I'm not sure why you made such a deal?
Second I live in Toronto, and for this type of photography, I would charge at least $2000. First off, you have to explain to them how to build the room setup, as well as the lighting positions, set lights, and finally you have to explain all of this to someone who doesn't understand what this is about.
This is important: In your agreement, write down that you do not guarantee that his photos are going to look good after you leave. As well, write that you will be charging them X amount of dollars per hour for any additional call and make sure they understand this and read it aloud.
Third, the store owner is your friend, you should take that in account. Hey, give him discount.
So, good luck

« Reply #4 on: July 08, 2010, 16:55 »
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Third, the store owner is your friend, you should take that in account. Hey, give him discount.
So, good luck

Likely this won't persist so you might as well charge full rate.

« Reply #5 on: July 08, 2010, 17:52 »
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I was contacted by a friend of mine that owns a large furniture store locally. ...

That's the problem. Friends and money... bad combination.

You have to make this worth your time but is your friend really up for paying for that?
I smell someone low-balling you.

In any case if you do follow through with it - best of luck!

« Reply #6 on: July 08, 2010, 18:33 »
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It's nice to be able to help your friends....  Make sure that he really understands that you're not able to create professional photographers "over night" !!! Meaning that it is unlikely that his own crew with next to no training, would be able to come anywhere near the result of his compeditors...

In stead...  Maybe you should make him realise that he needs YOU to do the shooting and the post processing of the images.. 

What you charge is up to you... Maybe you can get a lot of free furniture for your home...  Maybe you can get a decent and steady income from doing this work for him.. And as already suggested...  Maybe you can get free access to use the facilities for your own shooting...? And why not just sell the pictures you create for him at all the stock agencies?

« Reply #7 on: July 08, 2010, 18:36 »
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The job you are considering is basically like saying .. ok I'm going to show the client how to do what I do that way I will never have the chance of gaining a repeat client. BAD CHOICE !!!! .. You're kinda put in a spot now because it's a friend and you've already made steps at offering a service to them. I personally would not do it .. if it's a super duper close friend who would give you a kidney if you needed it then you might do it the one time and make them swear not to tell anybody that way you don't end up getting a call from Companies X, Y and Z asking for the same service. You'll never get anywhere offering services like that.

« Reply #8 on: July 08, 2010, 18:51 »
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Right on target Randy.

« Reply #9 on: July 08, 2010, 19:14 »
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« Reply #10 on: July 08, 2010, 19:18 »
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I have very good friend who runs a kitchenware business who never hires me for catalogue jobs and who is a very good photographer himself. He outsources the photography so he can run his business. It's much easier that way. I've done a fair amount of furniture photography for manufacturers and designers and it's not at all easy.

« Reply #11 on: July 08, 2010, 19:19 »
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I guess that I should have mentioned that he initially asked me to photograph all of his furniture for him.

Photography is a PART-TIME thing for me. I build websites for a living and have no desire to get locked into some long-term thing with anyone.

I'm the one that suggested I set up his studio for him so that I would not be required to take all of the photos. However, I hadn't thought so much about post. I've recently recommended another developer to help him with his website and that person should be able to handle post-production for him.

I was just looking for everyone's ballpark figure for setting up the studio. I already have a studio at home (with strobes, not hot lights). The reason that I suggested hot lights for him is to get the large depth of field required for furniture.

Thanks for all of the ideas and any other suggestions welcome!

« Reply #12 on: July 08, 2010, 20:00 »
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I think that there is no way/chance to make setup aka MakeItGood for this kind of stuff.
Heres a few examples. Look at number of Paths/isolations for partial corrections/additions what they applied for this shoots in path window.

« Reply #13 on: July 08, 2010, 20:01 »
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or in this one...
DL images and open in photoshop and see how many path selections they have for improving.
if you see other small gadget shots you will see much more selections when somebody forget to delete them.
« Last Edit: July 08, 2010, 20:05 by Suljo »

« Reply #14 on: July 08, 2010, 20:38 »
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He wants to be able to photograph furniture that he is selling as sets. Photo is from competitor's website.


« Reply #15 on: July 08, 2010, 22:08 »
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just charge base on the day rate, like how many days you will finish all the task, 2 weeks or 1 month, then finish it like a short term assignment.

« Reply #16 on: July 08, 2010, 22:09 »
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look
without numerous pathing there is no easy setups.
From image form competitor web photo is also deeply alerted with clipping path or mask additions. Look at fake shadows on left bed leg, fake glow shadow on carpet etc. so there is not setup at all. Even if he has milky plastic floor with min 10.000 Whs under floor and also this kind off walls with strobes in this strenght.
I think this image is shooted with basic 2 softboxes and isolated with clipping path and after that they drop automatic perspective shadow and thats it + fake some more which are not so logical.
Images above which I posted are from Whirpool and Miele and I think they are much more whealthy than some ordinary furniture producer or even worse if this producers cant or dont give him them they images of they furniture. (which are digitally alerted or not)
Anyhow If you friend is producer of his furniture and want to be higher than where is now he must hire man who will do the pathing job.
With automatic setup I think that didnt work.
Only setup is this 2 or 3 or 4 strobes but without pathing there in no easy results.
Before few years I have job to do similar thing (to do isolations of furniture from nearly same angle as you postit)
and fake room is shooted in company basement with rough concrete floor and behind rough white walls in basement. I will post it if I found it in my archive, but even today with too much processing it is impossible...

Eh
finaly I found it I dont realize that 10 years are passed...
Strip shows 100% of view of quality which are more than accepted this days...
« Last Edit: July 08, 2010, 22:44 by Suljo »

« Reply #17 on: July 09, 2010, 00:53 »
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Thanks Suljo! I didn't notice the fake shadow on the rug. It gives me a bit more to think about.

microstockphoto.co.uk

« Reply #18 on: July 09, 2010, 01:15 »
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The job you are considering is basically like saying .. ok I'm going to show the client how to do what I do that way I will never have the chance of gaining a repeat client. BAD CHOICE !!!!

Provide one really wishes to do it again! It happened to me quite a few times: doing a boring, time consuming work for a friend hoping no one else will ask me again.
« Last Edit: July 09, 2010, 01:18 by microstockphoto.co.uk »

« Reply #19 on: July 09, 2010, 02:07 »
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I guess that I should have mentioned that he initially asked me to photograph all of his furniture for him.

Photography is a PART-TIME thing for me. I build websites for a living and have no desire to get locked into some long-term thing with anyone.

I'm the one that suggested I set up his studio for him so that I would not be required to take all of the photos. However, I hadn't thought so much about post. I've recently recommended another developer to help him with his website and that person should be able to handle post-production for him.

I was just looking for everyone's ballpark figure for setting up the studio. I already have a studio at home (with strobes, not hot lights). The reason that I suggested hot lights for him is to get the large depth of field required for furniture.

Thanks for all of the ideas and any other suggestions welcome!

So, as I understand your post "Photography is a PART-TIME thing " and you didn't want to get stuck shooting his stuff.  To get around shooting the stuff yourself you suggested he setup a studio and shoot the furniture himself.  He also had work for you in what I'm guessing is your full time job "web development", but for that you suggested he hire another developer. Question, why not just suggest he buy the book "Website Development For Dummies" so that he could do that himself?

« Reply #20 on: July 09, 2010, 02:19 »
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The job you are considering is basically like saying .. ok I'm going to show the client how to do what I do that way I will never have the chance of gaining a repeat client. BAD CHOICE !!!!

Provide one really wishes to do it again! It happened to me quite a few times: doing a boring, time consuming work for a friend hoping no one else will ask me again.
I'm lucky all our friends know we're way too busy to do out of our specialization favors .. they all gave up asking a long time ago LOL  ;D .. I'm quick to say no to jobs I don't list as an available service.

« Reply #21 on: July 09, 2010, 02:32 »
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Quote
He also had work for you in what I'm guessing is your full time job "web development", but for that you suggested he hire another developer. Question, why not just suggest he buy the book "Website Development For Dummies" so that he could do that himself?

He was looking for someone full-time and I can't leave all of my other clients out in the cold to work for him only. I make a comfortable living freelance and want to keep it that way.

« Reply #22 on: July 10, 2010, 21:58 »
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Why not just set up a nice corner with wood floors and a neutral-colored wall? (Think "Pottery Barn" style.) Creating a cyc that big is pricey, and lighting ut with hot lights would be difficult (I personally would use strobes to isolate the background).

It never hurts to give your opinion on what you think would look best, and is more economical. Plus if he's concerned about the competition it never hurts to be different ... If I were shopping for furniture I think it would look better to see it placed in an "actual" room.


 

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