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Author Topic: What do you use for backing?  (Read 10436 times)

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« on: January 02, 2007, 03:40 »
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I have bought cardboard, but it gets crinkly quick. also tried black velvet.

Is there some sort of plastic people use, without going all out and buying the proper photo stuff?


« Reply #1 on: January 02, 2007, 03:48 »
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i have used thick white paper (you can buy this on a roll) or a white cloth that has some shine to it.  You could also try white plexi which you could shine a light through for great isolations

« Reply #2 on: January 02, 2007, 15:57 »
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leaf,

Why cloth with shine?  I would think the less reflective the better (for the background, that is).

Regards,
Adelaide

« Reply #3 on: January 02, 2007, 16:45 »
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yeah, well come to think of it, you might be right :) ???

i thought with shine so that it would reflect the most light possible and thus be extra white, but it might also send unnecessary light into the camera and make the image less contrasty

« Reply #4 on: January 03, 2007, 11:21 »
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I use sheets of this type of foam used for chiildren's crafts.  I prefer it over paper, because it I can clean it up, and prefer it over fabric, because the shadows don't have harsh textures.  It also comes in many different colors. 

« Reply #5 on: January 03, 2007, 15:38 »
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Karimala,

Do you mean EVA foam sheets?  I have two of them I bought for other purposes, I have never tried them in photography. 

I have some thick sheets of matte paper that work well in many circumstances, although they show a texture when photographed up close that can sometimes look like noise.  I used them in this series:



Regards,
Adelaide

« Reply #6 on: January 05, 2007, 05:46 »
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Hi,

I use background roll paper, it comes in rolls and I like the 3meters wide as it can be cut in smaller pieces for small objects and used all 3 meters wide to people shots.
It comes in a variety of colors to choose from but the "Artic White" is the must have from them.
This rolls are not so expensive so I do not complain much about throwing some away when it's get dirt.
I also use some white plastic sheets to shoot over a glass table and those allow me to use light from behind the background. very usefull for shadow free white isolations.

« Reply #7 on: January 05, 2007, 09:46 »
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I use white formica,or nevermar, it is relatively cheap and very durable. If you spill on it it cleans easily. It can be had at any home improvement store. You can lay it flat, or create a sweep. My costs on seamless paper have dropped dramatically since I purchased this.

« Reply #8 on: September 08, 2007, 23:35 »
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all of these are great for backgrounds, you need to keep your options open for each shot. Be creative and have fun. ;D

« Reply #9 on: September 09, 2007, 04:51 »
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I use white formica,or nevermar, it is relatively cheap and very durable. If you spill on it it cleans easily. It can be had at any home improvement store. You can lay it flat, or create a sweep. My costs on seamless paper have dropped dramatically since I purchased this.
Paper rolls are great  for portrait work, but can be a real nuisance for product shots. If you want to shoot a lot of product, consider getting a product photography table - there are some good bargain units to be had. One of the best benefits of such a setup is that the tabletop is made of translucent plastic - you can easily provide bottom lighting and change colours to suit the situation.
« Last Edit: September 09, 2007, 04:53 by sharply_done »

« Reply #10 on: September 09, 2007, 05:41 »
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I bought a 8ft by 4ft sheet of white formica from a DIY store for about $40. It curves beautifully and sits on top of a folding table (also bought a DIY store for about $35).

As JC photo says it is very durable, wipes clean and is big enough for larger objects and smaller children or babies. I also use a table top kit, but find it too small. I tried paper for a while, but really prefer a hard and durable white surface that bends to give a beautiful curve that avoids nasty corner shadows.

« Reply #11 on: September 09, 2007, 18:57 »
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I just use plain white paper.

« Reply #12 on: September 09, 2007, 23:43 »
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black and white velvet.

« Reply #13 on: September 10, 2007, 01:54 »
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Cheap material from the carnaval shop.  It's what the schools etc use to make cheap outfits for the children.

RacePhoto

« Reply #14 on: January 19, 2008, 06:31 »
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Duvetyne AKA Commando Cloth. 16 oz is the standard weight/thickness for duvetyne in the motion picture industry. It's fire retardent. Also spelled Duvetine and one place

Looks like it's just under $10 a yard at this site. Others I saw $14 a yard. Theater supply place had it for $2.99 a yard, with a 10 yard minimum.

http://www.filmtools.com/duv54rolx50y.html

No I'm not selling it, I just got a piece free and it's pretty heavy and looks interesting. First I'll have to iron it and then get out the lint brush.

How's that for reviving an old thread?  ;)

« Reply #15 on: January 31, 2008, 05:42 »
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I use painted wall, and it's not even white (clear apple green) until I over expose it a bit

« Reply #16 on: January 31, 2008, 09:45 »
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I have one spare room painted white all over, included the ceiling for bouncing. If it gets dirty at some point, just paint it over there.

« Reply #17 on: May 26, 2008, 08:19 »
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For isolated small subject, I have tried many kind of paper and fabrics, and finally prefer "avery graphic" bough at a big artist store. It is shiny vinyl with a paper on back that can be peeled to glue it. I don't need the glued back, but that's what I found best for now.

I'm not perfectly happy with it, but that the material that gave me the best result until now. There is no texture, just a perfecly sleek surface.

I will try those craft foam, it seems a good idea!  Thanks for sharing about it!  :-)


« Reply #18 on: May 26, 2008, 13:15 »
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You can also try a restaurant supply house. They usually have white paper rolls for covering long dining tables for events.

I myself just buy seamless from Adorama though.

That craft foam will work for very small objects.

chumley

« Reply #19 on: June 15, 2008, 13:48 »
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.
« Last Edit: August 23, 2008, 18:17 by chumley »

« Reply #20 on: June 15, 2008, 14:05 »
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chumley,
EXCELLENT suggestion. Makes practical and economical sense (cents)
Thanks for sharing that!

Cranky MIZ
The voice of reason

« Reply #21 on: June 15, 2008, 14:28 »
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This isn't entirely a "backing" response, but might readers of this thread might be interested.  Zack Arias has written the BEST tutorials on shooting on white that I've ever come across.

I've blogged several links to the chapters so I'll just point you to my blog:
http://microstockjunction.com/2008/05/09/zack-arias-on-shooting-on-white-seamless.aspx

chumley

« Reply #22 on: June 15, 2008, 19:12 »
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.

« Last Edit: August 23, 2008, 18:17 by chumley »

« Reply #23 on: June 16, 2008, 01:08 »
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We purchased our roll of arctic white paper from a teaching supply store.  The largest width they had was 4 feet, but it works perfect for our tabletop area.  We hang the roll from above the table and swing it down to the front. We have no harsh creases or lines, and when it gets dirty, we roll it out a little and start again. 
We tried the foam, but there were crease lines in it, and heavy items sink a little.  The formica sounds interesting, I think we'll have to give that a go soon. :)
Gebbie

« Reply #24 on: June 16, 2008, 02:53 »
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I have two plain white Kingsize flat sheets from out local supermarket 7 $14 each, these are sewn together to make a 9' x 18' backdrop, works great, washing and ironing is the hard part

David

« Reply #25 on: June 16, 2008, 09:30 »
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This isn't entirely a "backing" response, but might readers of this thread might be interested.  Zack Arias has written the BEST tutorials on shooting on white that I've ever come across.

I've blogged several links to the chapters so I'll just point you to my blog:
http://microstockjunction.com/2008/05/09/zack-arias-on-shooting-on-white-seamless.aspx


Thanks for posting this Pixart.  It has some excellent information in it.

I've been using a roll of heavy, arctic white background paper from B&H but the Formica sounds like the ticket for sure.  I must try that.

« Reply #26 on: June 17, 2008, 02:12 »
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I use white vinyl for my backdrop for small things or for the floor...  Or my lastolite hilite for the background!

« Reply #27 on: June 17, 2008, 11:17 »
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Seren, what do you do with full body shots on the lastolite?  I have their stupid expensive vinyl floorcloth (waste of 150 bucks) and it looks just awful in the pix.  It's always grey or if I try to light it the lower limbs are overexposed.   What works for you?  I'd love to do it all in-camera, but the floor always adds too much time in post. 

Maybe I should shoot no full body shots. ;)

« Reply #28 on: June 17, 2008, 11:34 »
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Seren, what do you do with full body shots on the lastolite?  I have their stupid expensive vinyl floorcloth (waste of 150 bucks) and it looks just awful in the pix.  It's always grey or if I try to light it the lower limbs are overexposed.   What works for you?  I'd love to do it all in-camera, but the floor always adds too much time in post. 

Maybe I should shoot no full body shots. ;)

I'd be interested in this as well.  I've been looking at the Lastolite HiLite but wasn't sure it was worth the $$$.  Any who have it, are you happy with it?  Any pros and cons you can share?  Looks like it would be good for partial body but how would you do a full body and maintain a seamless look? (or can you even do such a thing?)

« Reply #29 on: June 17, 2008, 12:16 »
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Seren, what do you do with full body shots on the lastolite?  I have their stupid expensive vinyl floorcloth (waste of 150 bucks) and it looks just awful in the pix.  It's always grey or if I try to light it the lower limbs are overexposed.   What works for you?  I'd love to do it all in-camera, but the floor always adds too much time in post. 

Maybe I should shoot no full body shots. ;)

Um, as above.  I bought 14 ($25) worth of white vinyl for the floor from a fabric shop.  It doesn't velcro but I don't really care...

And I throw an extra light on the feet, just as you would if you were using paper.

« Reply #30 on: June 17, 2008, 12:17 »
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I'd be interested in this as well.  I've been looking at the Lastolite HiLite but wasn't sure it was worth the $$$.  Any who have it, are you happy with it?  Any pros and cons you can share?  Looks like it would be good for partial body but how would you do a full body and maintain a seamless look? (or can you even do such a thing?)

To get a seamless look it's the same as shooting with paper, absolutely no difference.  The only difference is it takes about 3 meters less space to set up...


 

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