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Author Topic: swoozo.com - the next evil exploiter  (Read 7265 times)

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« on: January 24, 2015, 05:26 »
+7
Videos !!! for less than 1 (salesprice!!!)
http://www.swoozo.com/php/de/a_video.php?view=1&id=7 [nofollow]

Nothing more to say then kick the bucket, swoozo


ShadySue

« Reply #1 on: January 24, 2015, 05:59 »
+4
The name must be a variation of swizzle.

« Reply #2 on: January 24, 2015, 08:50 »
+6
The name must be a variation of swizzle.

Which is a variation of swindle?

ShadySue

« Reply #3 on: January 24, 2015, 09:18 »
+1
The name must be a variation of swizzle.

Which is a variation of swindle?
Technically, apparently, it's a variation of swizz:
swizz
swɪz/
noun
British informal
noun: swizz; plural noun: swizzes; noun: swiz; plural noun: swizes
    a thing that is disappointing or represents a mild swindle.
    "what a swizz!"

swizzle2
ˈswɪz(ə)l/
noun
British informal
noun: swizzle; plural noun: swizzles
    another term for swizz.

« Reply #4 on: January 24, 2015, 09:21 »
+1
The name must be a variation of swizzle.

Which is a variation of swindle?
Technically, apparently, it's a variation of swizz:
swizz
swɪz/
noun
British informal
noun: swizz; plural noun: swizzes; noun: swiz; plural noun: swizes
    a thing that is disappointing or represents a mild swindle.
    "what a swizz!"

swizzle2
ˈswɪz(ə)l/
noun
British informal
noun: swizzle; plural noun: swizzles
    another term for swizz.

I'll have to take your word for that. Here in the US, "swizzle" is commonly attached to the word "stick," as in swizzle stick, used for mixing drinks and spearing fruit garnishes for same.

If it has any other meaning here, I'm not aware of that.

But in the US, "swindle" seems to be most appropriate for that website.

« Reply #5 on: January 24, 2015, 09:24 »
0
Exploiter? Isn't it just some guys website? there is almost no content on there and what there is is very amateurish.

ShadySue

« Reply #6 on: January 24, 2015, 09:28 »
0
The name must be a variation of swizzle.

Which is a variation of swindle?
Technically, apparently, it's a variation of swizz:
swizz
swɪz/
noun
British informal
noun: swizz; plural noun: swizzes; noun: swiz; plural noun: swizes
    a thing that is disappointing or represents a mild swindle.
    "what a swizz!"

swizzle2
ˈswɪz(ə)l/
noun
British informal
noun: swizzle; plural noun: swizzles
    another term for swizz.

I'll have to take your word for that.
You really don't have to.
Like I do when Americanisms are used here, just put define: (word or phrase) into a search box.

« Reply #7 on: January 24, 2015, 11:33 »
+1
I'll have to take your word for that.
You really don't have to.
Like I do when Americanisms are used here, just put define: (word or phrase) into a search box.

Actually, I already did that. I'm computer literate too! Just thought I'd throw in a little linguistic interest. You know, the old "two people divided by a single language" thingy.

I wasn't trying to be snarky. Trust you weren't either.

ShadySue

« Reply #8 on: January 24, 2015, 11:49 »
0
I'll have to take your word for that.
You really don't have to.
Like I do when Americanisms are used here, just put define: (word or phrase) into a search box.

Actually, I already did that. I'm computer literate too! Just thought I'd throw in a little linguistic interest. You know, the old "two people divided by a single language" thingy.

I wasn't trying to be snarky. Trust you weren't either.
No, not at all. Someone told me fairly recently that they didn't know the define: thingy, so I thought I'd throw it in.
We are aware of the swizzle stick usage here too.

The worst 'division' I saw on msg was 'graft' which has totally different meanings there and here. By the time I worked out from the context that the US meaning must be vastly different from ours, someone had already posted about it.

Shelma1

« Reply #9 on: January 24, 2015, 12:11 »
+1
"Graft" has two completely different meanings in the U.S. You can graft two things together...for example, grafting a plant to rootstock. Or you can engage in political corruption, also known as graft. I'm sure there's some reason behind it.

« Reply #10 on: January 24, 2015, 12:27 »
0
They apparently have multiple contributors. I see photos that are less than exciting for prices from 1 to 120 euros, a 50/50 commission split and a quarterly payout!

"For every sale, you 50% (percent) of the price will be credited (price of the sold file in credits).
A gained Credit has a value of one (1) Euro.
The generated profits are paid quarterly (31.March / 30.June / 30.September / 31.December).
At the time of payment is the payment proof download ready."

The artist supply agreement is only in German, but I read it via Google Translate

http://www.swoozo.com/php/en/verkaufen_rechtliches.php?dokument=7

This lists the two owners and here's some other information a search revealed about other web sites they own

http://website.informer.com/Rayk+Boehm+Trotzinski+Sven+%2F+Boehm+Rayk+GbR.html

The site is really ugly, hard to navigate and the search is useless (at least in English).

I searched for office and was presented with a strawberry, a butterfly, geese in the grass, potatoes, pasta, a rusty lock (someone should ban those!), and this gem of stock (who would use this?)

http://www.swoozo.com/php/en/a_foto.php?view=1&id=637


ShadySue

« Reply #11 on: January 24, 2015, 12:43 »
0
"Graft" has two completely different meanings in the U.S. You can graft two things together...for example, grafting a plant to rootstock. Or you can engage in political corruption, also known as graft. I'm sure there's some reason behind it.
We have the first meaning.
The second meaning isn't used here that I know of and is the one I was referring to.
We also have 'graft/grafting/grafter', meaning hard work/ing/er, as in "She's a real grafter", or "You won't get far in stock without hard graft" - so you can see that this latter meaning could cause serious misunderstanding with the US meaning.

« Reply #12 on: January 24, 2015, 16:20 »
0
and this gem of stock (who would use this?)

http://www.swoozo.com/php/en/a_foto.php?view=1&id=637


Oh yes, that is just toooooooo much! What "concept" do you suppose that illustrates?

« Reply #13 on: January 24, 2015, 16:22 »
+3
We have the first meaning.
The second meaning isn't used here that I know of and is the one I was referring to.
We also have 'graft/grafting/grafter', meaning hard work/ing/er, as in "She's a real grafter", or "You won't get far in stock without hard graft" - so you can see that this latter meaning could cause serious misunderstanding with the US meaning.

That really is interesting! Funny how one fairly simple word like "graft" could end up with such bizarrely different meanings in two "English-speaking" countries.

swoozo

  • Microstock - Photostock - Picture Agency

« Reply #14 on: April 18, 2018, 06:37 »
0
Hello,
a lot of time has passed since the first post.
We have constantly improved and developed our website.
Visit us and convince yourself.

https://www.swoozo.com

Best regards,
Rayk

ShadySue

« Reply #15 on: April 18, 2018, 08:21 »
+2
Hello,
a lot of time has passed since the first post.
We have constantly improved and developed our website.
Visit us and convince yourself

You may have convinced yourself, but you won't convince us.
The search on office is still pretty much irrelevant. Top results:

And seperate should be 'separate'.
As Glenda Slagg would say, "Crazy name, crazy search"

Added: I've just noticed that the default search is 'random' which gives the above results.
The relevant results are indeed more 'relevant', (except the first two: how are they relevant?) but not necessarily more appealing:
« Last Edit: April 18, 2018, 09:32 by ShadySue »

swoozo

  • Microstock - Photostock - Picture Agency

« Reply #16 on: April 18, 2018, 09:20 »
0
Hello ShadySue,

at some point we will convince them!
The correction of the keywords is very laborious and takes a lot of time. We do our best...
Thanks for your reference ... The "seperate" error was corrected immediately!

Best regards,
Rayk

ShadySue

« Reply #17 on: April 18, 2018, 16:28 »
+5
The correction of the keywords is very laborious and takes a lot of time. We do our best...
It's hardly worth coming here until it's done and you have a solid strategy to improve search in future.
That would be an incredible differentiating feature compared to most,  probably all, of the micro/mid stocks, but oddly none of the people coming here flaunting their new site seem interested.
Yes, it would be a huge investment of time, skills and money, but without it, you've got nothing.

namussi

« Reply #18 on: April 22, 2018, 04:40 »
0
They apparently have multiple contributors.

Multiple means "more than one", and is redundant as "contributors" is already plural.

namussi

« Reply #19 on: April 22, 2018, 04:43 »
0
This title is wrong.

Streets in London do not have Chinese writing.

https://www.swoozo.com/en/photos-images-buy-and-download/file-information/call-1/id-127024/

« Reply #20 on: April 22, 2018, 05:09 »
0
This title is wrong.

Streets in London do not have Chinese writing.

https://www.swoozo.com/en/photos-images-buy-and-download/file-information/call-1/id-127024/
Title and description different looks very sloppy.( there are a few street signs in Chinese in ChinaTown London btw)

ShadySue

« Reply #21 on: April 22, 2018, 06:32 »
0
.

namussi

« Reply #22 on: April 22, 2018, 07:19 »
0
This title is wrong.

Streets in London do not have Chinese writing.

https://www.swoozo.com/en/photos-images-buy-and-download/file-information/call-1/id-127024/
Title and description different looks very sloppy.( there are a few street signs in Chinese in ChinaTown London btw)

True, but that picture is of a Hong Kong street.


 

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