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Author Topic: Can image rejection be a positive thing?  (Read 1980 times)

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« on: December 18, 2018, 19:09 »
+1
As you can see I am new here and don't want to break any rules about posting links, so I guess this will be removed if it's not appropriate but I feel it is.
On the subject of rejection...When I first started in stock I felt awful about being rejected and for me that was (looking back) the mistake I made. Why would "I" feel awful, the person on the other end of my images was not judging me personally.

I hope you guys can give me some feedback on my latest upload about getting rejected on stock sites. For me it helped improve my skills, once I had got passed the ego :-)

This new video is all about how we should or could handle rejection as a positive way to move our photography forward. https://youtu.be/tjwXpTZERV8 [nofollow]

I hope some of you who are completely new to stock take time to look at it and consider how you wish to move forward.

Thanks for taking the time people.


« Reply #1 on: December 19, 2018, 02:01 »
+2
As you can see I am new here and don't want to break any rules about posting links, so I guess this will be removed if it's not appropriate but I feel it is.
On the subject of rejection...When I first started in stock I felt awful about being rejected and for me that was (looking back) the mistake I made. Why would "I" feel awful, the person on the other end of my images was not judging me personally.

I hope you guys can give me some feedback on my latest upload about getting rejected on stock sites. For me it helped improve my skills, once I had got passed the ego :-)

This new video is all about how we should or could handle rejection as a positive way to move our photography forward. https://youtu.be/tjwXpTZERV8

I hope some of you who are completely new to stock take time to look at it and consider how you wish to move forward.

Thanks for taking the time people.
When I started Inspection was much tougher and it taught me a lot and helped me to produce saleable pictures. Now I find the process random or non-existent. Its probably a bad thing for me as although nearly everything passes I know my own standards are slipping as I'm lazy and tempted to say "that will do"

dpimborough

« Reply #2 on: December 19, 2018, 03:28 »
+3
Too many stock contributors take image rejections far too personally then hide behind the hackneyed phrase "but I'm an artist" or "its art"

If an image is rejected then take that as a sign you need to improve your quality.

A lot of the so called "art" on stock sites is appalling rubbish that shouldn't be up for sale.  A lot of so called "stock artists" are clueless as to how to even take basic photos.

So if your image is rejected take it as a kick in the pants that you have to improve.

Stock sites are there to sell half way decent images to commercial buyers not to stroke egos.

Its neither positive or negative its a quality standard that has to be met.


« Reply #3 on: December 19, 2018, 03:38 »
+2
Too many stock contributors take image rejections far too personally then hide behind the hackneyed phrase "but I'm an artist" or "its art"

If an image is rejected then take that as a sign you need to improve your quality.

A lot of the so called "art" on stock sites is appalling rubbish that shouldn't be up for sale.  A lot of so called "stock artists" are clueless as to how to even take basic photos.

So if your image is rejected take it as a kick in the pants that you have to improve.

Stock sites are there to sell half way decent images to commercial buyers not to stroke egos.

Its neither positive or negative its a quality standard that has to be met.
I would have totally agreed in the past where I could see why images were rejected even though I sometimes felt the reviewers were overly strict. Now I find often rejections appear quite random.  But absolutely its nothing personal I either suck it up or tweak and resubmit. I normally just ping it back to SS when I do get the odd rejection 80% are accepted 2nd time. Similarly when SS relaxed their standards I had 80% of my previously rejected work accepted...and some of it sells quite well.

« Reply #4 on: December 19, 2018, 09:49 »
0
While I take rejection as a "get your act together" it does seem SS has a random way of assessing stock lately.
Three videos I put up and 5 images were rejected for "quality"  (Grain) and yet all were shot with good lighting at 100 ISO and were accepted by other sites.

Go figure.

« Reply #5 on: December 19, 2018, 10:44 »
+2
Can image rejection be a positive thing?

Yes, it is very positive: more they reject the images of other contributors more chances I have to sell mine

Brasilnut

  • Author Brutally Honest Guide to Microstock & Blog

« Reply #6 on: December 19, 2018, 17:41 »
+1
I wish these agencies would start rejecting more for technical reasons, like in the past. By not doing so, they're doing new contributors a disservice.

rod

« Reply #7 on: December 19, 2018, 21:22 »
0
One of my suggestions for newbies is to focus on rejection, analyze it, and then you can find many things to improved.  Technical and skill , the choice
 of subject matter, more and more


 

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