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Author Topic: Spot on inside of lens  (Read 4042 times)

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« on: April 18, 2014, 13:19 »
0
I have a Nikon D200 kit lens that has been fine for years. However, I have noticed a black spot on all my latest images. Looking at the lens I can see a round spot/dust mark which is actually behind the glass which is impossible to get to. It is so obvious as it shows on every shot so for now I can use lightroom to remove it. How on earth can it get behind sealed glass ? I would have thought impossible. Is there any way I can remove this myself or take apart and clean ?


« Reply #1 on: April 18, 2014, 13:23 »
+1
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« Last Edit: May 11, 2014, 21:55 by tickstock »

« Reply #2 on: April 18, 2014, 14:06 »
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I can def say it's inside the lens because I can see it under the glass and also through the viewfinder.

« Reply #3 on: April 18, 2014, 14:13 »
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.
« Last Edit: May 11, 2014, 21:55 by tickstock »

stocked

« Reply #4 on: April 18, 2014, 14:16 »
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I can def say it's inside the lens because I can see it under the glass and also through the viewfinder.
that must be a monster spot! Spots on the lens normally only visible with extreme wideangle lenses otherwise its just a dreamy diffuser effect and not a spot on the final image

« Reply #5 on: April 18, 2014, 14:58 »
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This is what I can't understand as I thought it would show diffused on the actual image. I will try another lens just to make sure but the spot appears in the viewfinder and on the image in the exact spot,shape and size.

« Reply #6 on: April 18, 2014, 16:06 »
+1
If you live in a hot humid area, or the lens is old, it could be a mold/fungus growth inside the lens.

Goofy

« Reply #7 on: April 18, 2014, 16:20 »
+5
steel wool and sand paper will take that spot right off the lens  ;)



« Reply #8 on: April 18, 2014, 21:17 »
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I agree with Stan, it sounds like a pretty monstrous fungus infection. Examine it under magnification and if you can make out threads or black dots then it's definitely a fungal infection. They eat the coatings off the lens and some can produce acids that can etch the glass. Removal is difficult and involves not just dismantling the lens but also soaking the affected lens in a pretty awful bunch of chemical (there are details somewhere on MFlenses.com), it simply would not be worth it with a kit lens.
As a precaution, I wouldn't store it with other lenses though I haven't heard of direct transmission from one to another.
The only other thing I can think off is if some black anti-reflective paint has flaked off and got stuck to the glass. I've seen a small spot of that in a 50-year-old East German lens, I wouldn't expect a modern Nikkor to have a problem with flaking.

« Reply #9 on: April 18, 2014, 21:47 »
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can you upload a sample of the spot

Beppe Grillo

« Reply #10 on: April 19, 2014, 01:12 »
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It's probably a sensor spot, most things in the lens won't really show up.

With very closed diaphragma you will see it, and you will see it more with a wide angle lens. It will appear with the shape of your diaphragma (pentagon, hexagon, etc.)

Ron

« Reply #11 on: April 19, 2014, 01:38 »
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Herg, thanks for opening this thread. I have the same issue. I hope you dont mind me posting my example.

I know its a dirt spot, but I cant find it anywhere, its not on the glass, no on the mirror and as far as I can see its not on the sensor either. No idea where this is coming from.

Canond 6D+24-70L II


« Reply #12 on: April 19, 2014, 02:11 »
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I have many as well, I believe they are way too small to get noticed by our eye, best solution is trying to blow them away, if that doesn't work just send the body/lens to repair, never done that, I clone them all the time

« Reply #13 on: April 19, 2014, 02:50 »
+2
I have the same issue. I hope you dont mind me posting my example.


Sensor spots. You will see them if you examine the sensor with an illuminated loupe.

eg http://www.visibledust.com/products3.php?pid=602
« Last Edit: April 19, 2014, 02:52 by bunhill »

« Reply #14 on: April 19, 2014, 02:51 »
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Ron .... That's exactly what dust or similar on sensor looks like. Only shows up at small apertures. Can be hard to see with out the right gear. I have a magnifying loop thing with built in LED lights, even then can be hard to see sometimes.

« Reply #15 on: April 19, 2014, 02:52 »
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Visible Dust, that's the baby.

Ron

« Reply #16 on: April 19, 2014, 03:05 »
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Ron .... That's exactly what dust or similar on sensor looks like. Only shows up at small apertures. Can be hard to see with out the right gear. I have a magnifying loop thing with built in LED lights, even then can be hard to see sometimes.

Cheers, so what best to do? Take it to the shop?

stocked

« Reply #17 on: April 19, 2014, 03:29 »
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Ron .... That's exactly what dust or similar on sensor looks like. Only shows up at small apertures. Can be hard to see with out the right gear. I have a magnifying loop thing with built in LED lights, even then can be hard to see sometimes.

Cheers, so what best to do? Take it to the shop?
You should easily clean it by yourself just google Sensor cleaning.

« Reply #18 on: April 19, 2014, 03:29 »
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Personally, I clean my own because I get dust spots all the time and I shoot a lot at small apertures and cleaning charges are expensive. There is much 'fear' banded about regarding doing your own sensor cleaning, however, thorough research and yes, serious caution is required. I hesitate to recommend it, because whilst it's not actually rocket science, mistakes can be very expensive. Initial outlay on cleaning kit is also significant.

« Reply #19 on: April 19, 2014, 04:08 »
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This is the spot magnified. Not had chance to swap the lens yet but will report back when done.

Ron

« Reply #20 on: April 19, 2014, 04:31 »
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Thanks all, thanks Herg for letting me post here. I hope you get yours fixed too.

stocked

« Reply #21 on: April 19, 2014, 04:52 »
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Herg this is a sensor spot!

« Reply #22 on: April 19, 2014, 05:10 »
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Herg this is a sensor spot!

Indeed it must be as I just changed the lens and I can still see it in the view finder. At least it is not the lens phew  :)

Thanks for the help. The reason I thought it was the lens is because I can see it through the viewfinder. I know this might sound silly as I haven't cleaned a sensor before but would opening the mirror and having a vacuum cleaner very close pull it away (without touching of course)

« Reply #23 on: April 19, 2014, 05:20 »
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Herg this is a sensor spot!

Indeed it must be as I just changed the lens and I can still see it in the view finder.

You cannot see a sensor spot through the viewfinder.

« Reply #24 on: April 19, 2014, 06:28 »
+1
I think he's winding us up. He says he saw it clearly inside the lens, but it obviously isn't there,  it's clearly a sensor spot; then he said he saw it in the viewfinder after changing lenses. It's all either imagination or nonsense - except for the spot which means the sensor needs a clean.


 

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