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Author Topic: Ergonomic mouse or touch tablet?  (Read 8071 times)

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« on: September 30, 2010, 13:49 »
0
Hey fellow microstockers.

I believe I'm starting to develop Carpal Tunnel Syndrome, due to my 12-14 hours a day on a computer.

I decided to buy a new, ergonomic mouse since I have a normal wireless one. I went online and started searching and found 2 mice that might be interesting and I also remembered the Wacom touch tablet.

Here are the links (on eBay):

Wacon Touch Tablet - http://goo.gl/GHgm
Evoluent Vertical Mouse 3 Wireless - http://goo.gl/uFJj
Zero Tension Mouse - http://goo.gl/oaXL

I like all of them but the problem with the last one (Zero Tension Mouse) is that it's corded and I couldn't find it anywhere that ships to Brazil.


Does anyone use any of them? Any suggestions?

I'd like to know if the tablet has good precision since I'd also use it for illustrations and photo retouching.


Thanks in advance! ;)
Dan


« Reply #1 on: September 30, 2010, 14:14 »
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I had some other wrist problems and, I believe, these two solutions are helping me:

1) switching to a mini (laptop) mouse (not the smallest mouse, but much lighter than a regular one), cheap enough to try different models
2) additionally, using SpaceNavigator (http://www.3dconnexion.com/products/spacenavigator.html) -> more operations with my other hand (mostly scrolling and zooming in Photoshop)

« Reply #2 on: September 30, 2010, 14:27 »
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I've been using a Logitech Trackman Wheel for over a decade (wired). I have them on all my PC's. Your hand is resting on the desk and you mainly move your thumb and fingers so no issues with RSI, etc. They take a tiny bit of getting used to but I wouldn't use anything else.

Read the reviews;

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Logitech-910-000809-Trackman-Wheel/dp/B001ASC9BY/ref=sr_1_19?s=gateway&ie=UTF8&qid=1285874476&sr=8-19

« Reply #3 on: September 30, 2010, 14:43 »
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I've always used the Intuos3 tablet for photos and for regular browsing and I've never had any issues.  I have a bad wrist and the mouse used to ruin it every time I was at a computer for extended periods.  Once you get used to the tablet, it makes an amazing and efficient tool and I will never go back to a mouse.

« Reply #4 on: September 30, 2010, 15:00 »
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Get a Wacom tablet.  You won't go back once you do.  I can't stand editing photos without one now.  I use a regular mouse for surfing and general computer use but the Wacom for editing.  if a mouse was hard on your hands, surfing with a pen on a Wacom should be a nice change.

Xalanx

« Reply #5 on: September 30, 2010, 15:06 »
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As it happens, I had a wacom tablet (still have one now) and I tried also the intuos 4, large size. This is nice indeed, but I found myself much more effective with post processing using my mouse (a Logitech G9). A lot of people said if I go tablet way I won't go back, but I just can't stand it. The mouse is really cool for me, I have tools mapped to each button.

« Reply #6 on: September 30, 2010, 15:08 »
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I actually think the desk set up makes a big difference too. I like to have an L shape, so I can rest my arm on the desk and my wrist is straight.

« Reply #7 on: September 30, 2010, 15:20 »
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Tablets are awesome however they also involve wrist movement which in your case might not be as comfortable or productive. So I would second the trackball suggestion ... I would never recommend a traditional mouse for anything to be honest.


Fotonaut

« Reply #9 on: September 30, 2010, 15:21 »
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Wacom with pen. I have used many Graphire and Intous versions over the years, but now use Wacom Touch with pen since it doesnt take much desk space.
« Last Edit: October 01, 2010, 01:17 by Fotonaut »

« Reply #10 on: September 30, 2010, 15:31 »
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Thanks for the replies so far!

A few questions:

ichiro17, I had a look at that tablet but is it only usable with a pen or by touch too?

Leaf, I have a tablet, but just works with pen. I need something I can use to do anything, surf the net, etc... I had a look at the touch tablets and they seem quite nifty. I'm just wondering if it's precise enough and practical to use.

PixelAway, I quite liked that SpaceNavigator. I would buy one but it's a bit pricy for me at the moment. I mean, I don't do THAT much editing to need one. I need a more "day-to-day" device.

Thanks again,
Dan

« Reply #11 on: September 30, 2010, 23:16 »
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I use the pen for everything and I love it.  It takes getting used to.  There is no touch, but then again, I have read mediocre reviews about BambooTouch anyways

« Reply #12 on: October 01, 2010, 02:43 »
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Leaf, I have a tablet, but just works with pen. I need something I can use to do anything, surf the net, etc... I had a look at the touch tablets and they seem quite nifty. I'm just wondering if it's precise enough and practical to use.


Ah, ok.  I haven't tried the touch tablets either.  I didn't actually know they made them.  I am using an intuous 3 tablet so that is all I really know.

« Reply #13 on: October 01, 2010, 04:14 »
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A tablet is great for photo retouching but not so good for vectors. I find it much easier to precisely locate control points with a mouse. Depends on your illustration technique I guess.

« Reply #14 on: October 01, 2010, 07:27 »
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Just to let everyone know, I just purchased on eBay the Evoluent Vertical Mouse 3 Wireless - http://goo.gl/uFJj

I'll give it a try and if it doesn't help, I'll try another one! But until it arrives (4-6 weeks) I'll have to use my left hand.

Thanks again for all your help.

jbarber873

« Reply #15 on: October 01, 2010, 08:30 »
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  My daughter spends most of her life tethered to a mouse and tablet. I gave her the tablet when i couldn't get the hang of it, and she loves it. It's great for delicate drawing and shading ( she's a game designer). The bad part is she is still having wrist problems because she uses both at the same time. She got one of those wrist supports that you strap around your arm, and that helped. But what really made the difference was changing the height of her chair to be higher, so her arm was at a straighter angle. ( like the suggestion to have an L shaped desk). It takes a long time- like weeks- to notice a difference. ( and that's on someone 18 years old- for me it would be maybe a year!)

rubyroo

« Reply #16 on: October 01, 2010, 11:34 »
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Yes an L-shaped desk does sound like a good idea.

Dan - I'd be really interested to know how you get on with that vertical mouse. 

« Reply #17 on: October 01, 2010, 12:26 »
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When I started to get more pain from a mouse, I tried 2 trackballs:
-thumb
-forefinger
The thumb trackball was easy to use and helped the pain, for a while, but then it came back. The forefinger trackball was not good.

Now I am using a Wacom tablet which came with a pen and a mouse which works on the tablet. Some applications don't work well with the pen (Poser Pro for example) then I switch to the mouse. This setup hasn't caused wrist pain.

RacePhoto

« Reply #18 on: October 01, 2010, 21:33 »
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I actually think the desk set up makes a big difference too. I like to have an L shape, so I can rest my arm on the desk and my wrist is straight.

Actually I think you hit on something. I've been a computer addict for decades and don't have wrist problems. (yet?) I have a big desk, with lots of room to rest my arm on the desk when I'm working the mouse. The old desk had a pull out with a towel to raise the level, and I rested my arm on that. Backup system is on that one now. None are "computer" desks, they have typewriter holders, are high, big and solid.

Your point might be an interesting one, that having the big desk or one that you can rest your arm on, instead of some of the tiny pull outs that hold a keyboard, or small limited space situations, could cause painful positions and angles. How big is big? 54" wide and 32" deep. This is no skimpy little desktop top. :) Two towers, monitor, a small horizontal workstation, flatbed scanner, photo scanner and printer, (stacked) router, VOIP gizmo, (on top of one of the full size towers) with room left over for the mouse pad, speakers, pen cup, KVM, three external drives and small phone.

It does remind me that my Brother has a tablet that he tried, didn't like and it's lost somewhere in his computer junk. I'll have to try to borrow it from him again. It seems that a high percentage of people who do editing, find it better and easier after awhile. I'm happy with the mouse, but wonder if a tablet would be better for fine outlines?

Anyway, room to rest ones arm may be more important than some ergonomic voodoo mouse. I mean, how ergonomic can a mouse be? It has buttons and wheels? What's to form fit so your hand isn't stressed or your writs isn't bent funny? The position, angle and height of the whole arm seems to be more important.

« Reply #19 on: October 03, 2010, 14:07 »
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Heya...

My table is actually an L shape and I'm now trying to use the side so my arm is better leveled. Let's join that with the new vertical mouse (which will arrive next month) and see if it's all better!

I'll definitely let everyone know the results if the mighty mouse! ;)

RacePhoto

« Reply #20 on: October 05, 2010, 01:05 »
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Heya...

My table is actually an L shape and I'm now trying to use the side so my arm is better leveled. Let's join that with the new vertical mouse (which will arrive next month) and see if it's all better!

I'll definitely let everyone know the results if the mighty mouse! ;)

I asked someone else, since I don't have a problem. I figured people who have found the need would have some advise.

Have you tried a wrist pad to elevate your arm, so your hand is in a more natural position? That was the most common solution to tired and aching wrists from using a mouse.

Good Luck, don't forget to report back. :)

RT


« Reply #21 on: October 06, 2010, 04:18 »
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Tried one of these the other day in the store:

http://www.apple.com/magictrackpad/

Nifty piece of kit

« Reply #22 on: October 06, 2010, 04:39 »
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I'm at least twice as fast with a 6 button mouse as with any kind of trackpad. Especially when it comes to any kind of detail work or a lot of mouse movement.

My co-worker stopped using a mouse once he got a macbook pro. He was impressed with the fancy moves and gestures of his trackpad. Then I showed him my mouse and how I program it for different programs. He ordered it the next day.

For editing wacom is great though. It's very hard (or rather time consuming) to get very detailed masks with a mouse. If you don't need those then I think a mouse should be ok.

« Reply #23 on: October 07, 2010, 16:49 »
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I've been using a Logitech Trackman Wheel for over a decade (wired). I have them on all my PC's. Your hand is resting on the desk and you mainly move your thumb and fingers so no issues with RSI, etc. They take a tiny bit of getting used to but I wouldn't use anything else.

Read the reviews;

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Logitech-910-000809-Trackman-Wheel/dp/B001ASC9BY/ref=sr_1_19?s=gateway&ie=UTF8&qid=1285874476&sr=8-19


Following your advice,i ordred this mouse on ebay last sunday and got it today,it work just great very efficient and accurate,i don't have to move my wrist at all...

Thanks Gostwyck this is an excellent product.

« Reply #24 on: October 07, 2010, 17:16 »
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Following your advice,i ordred this mouse on ebay last sunday and got it today,it work just great very efficient and accurate,i don't have to move my wrist at all...

Thanks Gostwyck this is an excellent product.

Delighted to help __ it's much cheaper than one of those fancy tablets too.


 

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