MicrostockGroup Sponsors


Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Messages - Worried Sick

Pages: [1]
1
iStockPhoto.com / Re: what da EFF istock...
« on: April 13, 2011, 14:09 »
I just receive this sitemail:

I was wondering what you might sell your usage for your "lightbox XX" and "lightbox XXX" collections for as a whole group?  Just let me know.


Thoughts? I'm bit confused about what he wants. He can just buy entire lightboxes, no?

Yes, of course he/she can. You have nothing to do directly with prices or sales. Now things are getting even wonkier. Tell him you don't set the prices, istock does, and that there is a buy this lightbox button at the lower right-hand corner of each of the light boxes for his/her convenience.  

2
iStockPhoto.com / Re: what da EFF istock...
« on: April 13, 2011, 13:49 »
Obvious and typical scam.


Agreed. Sounds like a typical scam. First thing copy and paste the full header of the email you received into this web site to find out where the person is located that you sent you the email:

http://www.iptrackeronline.com/header.php

You might find they are located in a suspicious country in either Asia or West Africa.

Secondly, how would a photo buyer get your email address? Normally email addresses don't show to photo buyers on iStock. Or did he/she PM you though the internal message system?  

Ask them for their phone number and say you would like to call to discuss and then match the country code of their phone number with their country location based upon their IP address from their email header and see if it is a match. You might find they give you a forwarding number from another country different from where they are located.

Then, if they are a confirmed scammer, send them a huge hi-res 100meg TIF file of just black color in the file and tell them you are sending them the file for free because of all their troubles. :)

3
Unfortunately, at this point, I have no choice but to try and make a whole lot of money. Its not what I want of course, who would? But I was lavish with my money and blew it all on lens caps. So now I have no choice but to hope that if and when I put a picture up on iStock that it sells. I know it's a lot to expect and please pardon me for my greed.

P.S. - If you are not in it for the money either like I was, and just want a new lens cap, then no need to invest all those thousands of dollars in equipment, spend bundles of money on models and props, and hundreds of hours shooting, retouching, keywording, and uploading pictures to iStock because I will send you a lens cap for free, OK?

4
Quote
Go from hobby to money-maker: For freelancers, Web makes fun pursuits pay
April 7, 2009 By Andrew Newman

At iStockphoto, contributors earn a percentage of the download price -- starting at a 20 percent base royalty rate. That means for photos, earnings can range from 30 cents to more than $8 per download on a pay-as-you-go plan. The amount earned depends on the size of the photo. The rest of the money goes to the site.

iStockphoto's subscription plans offer a chance for contributors to earn even more money per download."Go from hobby to money-maker: For freelancers, Web makes fun pursuits pay."

Contributors with enough downloads and positive feedback can enter the Exclusivity program; in essence, iStockphoto becomes their agent. Exclusive contributors get more money per download and other benefits like the opportunity to submit their work to stock photo giant Getty Images.

The site is free to join, but contributors have to apply and submit three samples of their work before approval -- so pictures from the family trip to Disney World probably won't cut it.

That doesn't mean the site is professionals only."It doesn't really matter if someone considers themselves a professional or not," said iStockphoto COO Kelly Thompson.

Doctors and policemen are among the 4,000-plus Exclusive contributors, and they aren't planning on quitting their day jobs _ even though top contributors can earn $150,000 a year.

"People aren't looking to make a whole lot of money, but they want to get that new lens cap," Thompson said.


5
iStockPhoto.com / Re: Fraud going down at IS
« on: December 27, 2010, 09:59 »
Unfortunately, there's no real instant loss to the supplier by a theft of intellectual property, so the analogy isn't accurate.  People who do this were not going to license the content legitimately, so you're not losing out on that money.  The people in Russia they will sell the cds to weren't going to license the content legitimately.

Also, how do we know if a theft is/has occurred that it is a legitimate theft even? We saw the system register a download and place the money in our accounts. If they later claim it was theft and want to take the money back I think they would also need to produce evidence of the theft and how it occurred. Either way though, I think they are still liable.

6
iStockPhoto.com / Re: Fraud going down at IS
« on: December 27, 2010, 09:56 »
Imagine you are a supplier of neck ties to a department store on consignment. Someone steals 10 of the ties you placed on their tie racks for sale. Don't you think the department store still needs to pay you as the supplier of the stolen neck ties? After all, it is not your fault they were stolen and it is a business risk the department store takes. So it is up to them to make sure their security controls are strong enough to prevent people from stealing.

It is the same at iStock. Contributors have enough to worry about with the time, effort, and investment it takes just to create those images, upload, keyword, etc. So if they get stolen from the iStock site, I think iStock should and has to be responsible for the cost of the stolen product and cannot deny payment to their suppliers.

Unfortunately, there's no real instant loss to the supplier by a theft of intellectual property, so the analogy isn't accurate.  People who do this were not going to license the content legitimately, so you're not losing out on that money.  The people in Russia they will sell the cds to weren't going to license the content legitimately.

Good points. But I still think it is a question of legal liability on intellectual property. Remember, when we upload images to iStock we are trusting that iStock's servers are fully secure. If our images get stolen from their site then are you are suggesting we cannot hold them liable in any way?

7
iStockPhoto.com / Re: Fraud going down at IS
« on: December 27, 2010, 09:53 »
http://www.istockphoto.com/forum_messages.php?threadid=286152&page=1

Just keep an eye on your downloads from IS today.  Someone is rampantly downloading large sized files at a $1 per credit price.


By the way, none of my rampant large sized downloads were at $1 a pop or less. They all averaged around $7-$9, depending on size. Although, the royalties do seem lower than what they normally would be on downloads of the XXL and XXXL file sizes.

8
iStockPhoto.com / Re: Fraud going down at IS
« on: December 27, 2010, 09:24 »
If this does turn out to be theft resulting from iStock not securing their system well enough to prevent hacking, then I don't see how iStock would have the right to take the money back from the contributors. If someone downloaded a file illegally from iStock, but has the opportunity to use it, then I think the contributors still deserve to be paid by iStock, even if iStock was robbed.

Imagine you are a supplier of neck ties to a department store on consignment. Someone steals 10 of the ties you placed on their tie racks for sale. Don't you think the department store still needs to pay you as the supplier of the stolen neck ties? After all, it is not your fault they were stolen and it is a business risk the department store takes. So it is up to them to make sure their security controls are strong enough to prevent people from stealing.

It is the same at iStock. Contributors have enough to worry about with the time, effort, and investment it takes just to create those images, upload, keyword, etc. So if they get stolen from the iStock site, I think iStock should and has to be responsible for the cost of the stolen product and cannot deny payment to their suppliers.

I think they know this though, and if it does turn out to be a case of image theft, they will probably bite the bullet and leave the earnings already placed in the accounts of the contributors who were paid for these downloaded images. On the other hand, if these images start showing up in pirated collections of digital stock imagery being sold around the world, then the liability issue for iStock could be much greater.

Let's hope for the best, that the sales all occurred legitimately, and that within a few days this mounting worry is put to rest. Cheers to all.

(grammatical errors corrected)

9
Since you're new here, you might have missed we have a category for image fraud, which is the category the post is in.  Most people come to the front page of the site which lists all the recent posts so it would have been easily seen.  On the other hand, maybe it would be more "topical" in the "IS" category.  So, I've moved it.

Thanks for the additional input about the site and good I think that you moved it.

Quote
Most computers have a functionality called "copy and paste" which would easily let you copy and paste your thoughts to the thread so that people discussing it don't need to look in two places.

I hope you are not being sarcastic in trying to school me on C&P. Anyway, if you read what I wrote more closely, then I think you will see that I mentioned it was more of an issue of not wanting to spend the time re-tailoring the post to add it to an existing post since it was written from the perspective of a first post. It I just C&P the post into yours, then I think it would read a little funny from an existing post perspective, wouldn't you agree?

Anyway, as I said, please feel free to do what you like this post. Scrap it all together, lock it, whatever makes you happy. Again, I think there is some good content in my original post worth noting in terms of the potential catastrophic outcome of a potential massive cyber theft and worth bringing to the attention of other iStock contributors who could also be affected by something like that. So far you have only been interested in the fact though whether I have posted my message in the right place or not.

Well, enough said I think. Have a happy new year...

10
As Sue said, there is an existing post (by me).  You should repost in there, and leaf can lock this one.

Unfortunately I did not see your post and the reason I didn't see it is because it is not in the iStock forum category. I think many people are missing that post you made because of where you placed it. So I think a thread in the iStock forum would be good to have too as most likely many istockers are missing your other post over there.  ;)

Anyway, sorry, I don't feel like re-tailoring my post so it fits as an add-on to your post now that I have taken the time to write out all my thoughts on this. If someone wants to lock this thread that is fine, but I think it would be wrong to do so when I covered some issues not covered in your post, together with the fact that my post falls right into the iStock forum category and yours doesn't.

Cheers.

11
I haven't seen any posts about this yet here on the forum, but there is already a longish thread about it on the iStock forum about the strange number of bulk XXL and XXXL downloads occurring in people's portfolios yesterday over Christmas weekend.

http://www.istockphoto.com/forum_messages.php?threadid=286152&page=1

One person having had 26 maximum sized Vetta sales all in one day. We are talking about possibly a $2,000 purchase for the photo buyer on that one alone. It could just be an end of the year buying spree for many buyers who are either planning on closing down their accounts, or who want to use up their buying budgets for the year, but to do that on a Sunday over Christmas weekend seems odd when most designers would not be working. Of course that is what we are all hoping it is though and nothing more than that. The disheartening issue is that iStock has not chimed in yet at all to say whether there is some sort of glitch in the system or not.

On the other hand, if this is an attack of Cyber theft then the ramifications of it for iStock could be huge and would explain why they are not saying anything about it for the meantime until they get some legal advice about how to handle it. It could be corporate image suicide for them and they may in fact not be able to pinpoint the source yet or are able to stop it at this point and possibly be the reason why they have kept quiet until they feel they have a handle on it. I hate to think it could be a disgruntled employee who has access to corporate buyer accounts with large credits in them and is using those accounts to download quality hi-res images for a bigger espionage plan.

The most serious of outcomes could be that someone has strategically chosen this time to hack into the system and download lots of large files when they know the iStock Admins are away and not on hand to take action within the iStock network system to stop the looting. What the thieves could be planning to do with all these high quality images is scary and they could use them to launch pirated CD-ROMS filled with our images and sell them for dirt cheap in countries like China and India for example where they would have no qualms about buying or using pirated intellectual property for commercial use. Think of the billions of people that could obtain free use to people's work on iStock in just those 2 massive countries alone.

If that were to happen, then both the financial and PR backlash for iStock could be huge. It could result in a large class action lawsuit from contributors who sue iStock for millions for compromising their intellectual property. Ultimately, iStock would be held responsible for the financial ramifications of an attack of theft like that and it could be millions as I said.

All of this is very scary. Yesterday I had 4 XXXL downloads in a row myself all on the same type of image and all occur within minutes of each other, which follows the same pattern everyone is talking about in the above iStock forum post. These 4 images of mine have never sold before in a pattern like that nor at those sizes consistently.

I am just hoping that all of these downloads are legit and that iStock Admins chime in very soon to let everyone know that everything is alright. Otherwise, if the outcome is the potential nightmare I just was talking about, then it would explain why iStock has been very quiet so far and that a big old hurricane could be about to hit the shores.

Let's us all keep our fingers crossed and pray for some good and comforting news from iStock. It would be great if my biggest fears are all false and alleviated very shortly and that this is/was just some sort of strange photo-buyer buying spree which put a bit of extra Christmas jingle in all of our pockets.

Pages: [1]

Sponsors

Microstock Poll Results