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Author Topic: Prices  (Read 6307 times)

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« on: March 21, 2013, 06:46 »
0
Of course i don't want put price on the things of others, but since we don't need to pay commissions to agencies, seems logical that we can charge lower prices, even as a way to attract buyers in a first moment.

What do you think?


« Reply #1 on: March 21, 2013, 08:14 »
+2
I'm not convinced lower prices attract buyers and there's going to be quite a bit of costs with hosting a large portfolio.  So I'm not going to be pricing too low.  I also think that if people are going to link their sites, they should have prices in a similar range or it might put buyers off.

« Reply #2 on: March 21, 2013, 08:41 »
0
So, maybe a search by price be interesting.

« Reply #3 on: March 21, 2013, 08:48 »
0
For anyone who has been working in microstock for a few years, plus reading the forums here should have a pretty good idea what their work is worth.

I don't see a need to lower my prices to what my actual payout would be, let's say at Stockfresh for example.

I don't have to charge iStock's prices either but somewhere in between.

After all, charging "realistic" prices guarantees that, by keeping 100% of the funds, the money will be spent wisely on new high quality content that the buyer came for in the first place.

« Reply #4 on: March 21, 2013, 09:15 »
0
Ultimately it would be great if this takes off and we can all host and licence our own images rather than doing it through agencies who do not care how little they pay us as individuals because they sell so many They are okay.

I will not be quoting prices at less than agencies but at least equal to or hopefully more, with a view to only selling though my own site as I cannot see the point of doing that and all but giving them away elsewhere as well  :)

Leo Blanchette

« Reply #5 on: March 21, 2013, 13:46 »
+4
A few things I've learned on my own site:

Lower prices do not mean more sales.
Higher prices give more value to what the customer buys.

Learned this from clipartof.com:

Higher prices (and with it a slightly more permissive EULA) are a winning solution and maintain your work's value. It has a market.

Conversely if your work sells at the price of a candy bar, and you get the commission of what a gumball costs...and for the price of a cake your work is licensed for free among millions of people... You can see where that is going.

« Reply #6 on: March 21, 2013, 18:26 »
0
A few things I've learned on my own site:

Lower prices do not mean more sales.
Higher prices give more value to what the customer buys.


Learned this from clipartof.com:

Higher prices (and with it a slightly more permissive EULA) are a winning solution and maintain your work's value. It has a market.

Conversely if your work sells at the price of a candy bar, and you get the commission of what a gumball costs...and for the price of a cake your work is licensed for free among millions of people... You can see where that is going.

my experience exactly.. and agree with the rest..


 

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