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Author Topic: I believe in quality.  (Read 14198 times)

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« on: November 07, 2016, 13:21 »
+3
A good portfolio makes good money, a bad portfolio goes empty. A bad portfolio means out-dated images which do not meet the demand of the market. The consequence would be, produce better images or leave the business and not to waste valuable time with complaints, petitions or weird accusations.


Shelma1

« Reply #1 on: November 07, 2016, 13:37 »
+42
Meh. I'm always amazed at the images people license. Some of the stuff I was embarrassed to upload went on to become my best selling images.

And it doesn't matter how amazing your work is if you're being paid two cents for it.

Up with complaints and petitions!

« Reply #2 on: November 07, 2016, 14:24 »
+9
Some of my best sellers are 10 years old and would never ever get appoved nowadays. In their time they were quality images but I wouldn't even try to upload them anywhere now.

« Reply #3 on: November 07, 2016, 14:28 »
+3
Same experience here... many shots we wouldn't upload any more sell better than many others where we invest many time and knowledge.

« Reply #4 on: November 07, 2016, 14:42 »
+3
This is business not art "good" means sells. Not artistic, technically difficult or expensive to produce. Although as has been said by others  I can find little pattern in what sells....that's why I'm not very successful.

alno

« Reply #5 on: November 07, 2016, 14:47 »
+6
A good portfolio makes good money, a bad portfolio goes empty. A bad portfolio means out-dated images which do not meet the demand of the market. The consequence would be, produce better images or leave the business and not to waste valuable time with complaints, petitions or weird accusations.

So what's wrong with signing couple of petitions and making decent content at the same time?
"Better" is not the same to "better selling" by the way.

« Reply #6 on: November 07, 2016, 14:51 »
+1
""Better" is not the same to "better selling" by the way".......actually in the context of Mstock being a business I think it is ;-).

« Reply #7 on: November 07, 2016, 14:54 »
+6
A good portfolio makes good money, a bad portfolio goes empty. A bad portfolio means out-dated images which do not meet the demand of the market. The consequence would be, produce better images or leave the business and not to waste valuable time with complaints, petitions or weird accusations.

I also believe in quality, but not in $0.02 royalty for a quality photo

« Reply #8 on: November 07, 2016, 15:18 »
+22
Quality is such a vague term in the context of licensing stock. If a buyer finds it useful - or lots of buyers find it useful -  then saying it's low quality but sells a lot seems pretty daft to me. Assuming that work that doesn't sell doesn't meet market demand assumes that the market got to take a look at the work and decided not to buy it. That's not always what happens. Good, current, saleable work can and does languish sometimes.

I've been selling stock a while and have seen sales for images take off or sink as changes in search results occur on a site (easier to see when collections were smaller). Not seasonal images, or outdated technology or fashion; just a sudden shift in what ends up on page one for default search results. I'm not the only one who's seen this - you can find oodles of discussions of overnight changes.

Reality is that search position isn't the only thing that determines sales, but it's a huge factor. You can't flog cr#p by putting it on page one, but if there are several perfectly usable images in a certain category, the one up front in the search results will typically sell better.

But the idea that quality images (whatever those are) will just float to the top is wishful thinking, IMO. Good images in an underserved niche have more of a shot than those in an oversupplied category (over 3 million hits for Christmas background on Shutterstock for example), but filling the first page with spammed garbage helps no-one (I doubt that stuff actually sells as it's mostly much less good than what you see in a popular search) and hurts both buyers and ethical, honest contributors.

It's true that contributors don't and can't control the search engine, but can fuss if there are bugs an agency hasn't noticed or horrendous unfairness of some sort. Fussing without leverage generally doesn't work (that's the big stick part of walk softly and carry a big stick).

The bigger the agencies get, the less they need any one of us - they're more worried about getting and keeping buyers than contributors at this point (especially SS with their apparent disinterest in what's in the collection as long as the numbers are big and growing). So it's harder than it was to influence them.

You could choose to avoid dealing with complaints or petitions, but I think there's bucketloads of data from the last decade and a half that thinking all you have to do is produce better images and sales will come isn't going to work out.

« Reply #9 on: November 07, 2016, 15:36 »
+4
Quality is such a vague term in the context of licensing stock. If a buyer finds it useful - or lots of buyers find it useful -  then saying it's low quality but sells a lot seems pretty daft to me. Assuming that work that doesn't sell doesn't meet market demand assumes that the market got to take a look at the work and decided not to buy it. That's not always what happens. Good, current, saleable work can and does languish sometimes.

I've been selling stock a while and have seen sales for images take off or sink as changes in search results occur on a site (easier to see when collections were smaller). Not seasonal images, or outdated technology or fashion; just a sudden shift in what ends up on page one for default search results. I'm not the only one who's seen this - you can find oodles of discussions of overnight changes.

Reality is that search position isn't the only thing that determines sales, but it's a huge factor. You can't flog cr#p by putting it on page one, but if there are several perfectly usable images in a certain category, the one up front in the search results will typically sell better.

But the idea that quality images (whatever those are) will just float to the top is wishful thinking, IMO. Good images in an underserved niche have more of a shot than those in an oversupplied category (over 3 million hits for Christmas background on Shutterstock for example), but filling the first page with spammed garbage helps no-one (I doubt that stuff actually sells as it's mostly much less good than what you see in a popular search) and hurts both buyers and ethical, honest contributors.

It's true that contributors don't and can't control the search engine, but can fuss if there are bugs an agency hasn't noticed or horrendous unfairness of some sort. Fussing without leverage generally doesn't work (that's the big stick part of walk softly and carry a big stick).

The bigger the agencies get, the less they need any one of us - they're more worried about getting and keeping buyers than contributors at this point (especially SS with their apparent disinterest in what's in the collection as long as the numbers are big and growing). So it's harder than it was to influence them.

You could choose to avoid dealing with complaints or petitions, but I think there's bucketloads of data from the last decade and a half that thinking all you have to do is produce better images and sales will come isn't going to work out.
Excellent thoughtful post as ever

Giveme5

« Reply #10 on: November 07, 2016, 16:21 »
+5
I did a very detailed analysis of my 5,000 plus images on line and found 100 of them produce about 80% of my overall sales but some of them I don't consider to be very high quality.  Other variables such as timing and dumb luck play an important role as well in these so-called gem images besides our technical skills. 

On some of my so called high quality images attempts (spent numerous hours preparing) I've had no sales! Thus I've kind of given up on trying to understand what sells and what doesn't - just shoot what you want to do and have fun!



« Reply #11 on: November 07, 2016, 16:40 »
0
Jo Ann, your English is very sophisticated and elaborate. Many times I do not have a clue what your message means. This is entirely my fault, because I am not a native speaker in English. It might be, that many misunderstandings and disputes in this forum relate to this problem, that we have a whole bunch of different nationals around here, whos English is somehow horrible.

« Reply #12 on: November 07, 2016, 17:07 »
+4
Josephine, I see your point on dismissing some complaints but the two petitions being raised are addressing issues that affect ALL contributors, including you, no matter how amazing your works are.

« Reply #13 on: November 07, 2016, 21:40 »
+3
Jo Ann, your English is very sophisticated and elaborate. Many times I do not have a clue what your message means. This is entirely my fault, because I am not a native speaker in English. It might be, that many misunderstandings and disputes in this forum relate to this problem, that we have a whole bunch of different nationals around here, whos English is somehow horrible.

Josephine, I just want to let you know that what Jo Ann writes is not only excellent English but also excellent analysis. It's worth taking time to figure out what she's saying.

And by the way, your own written English reads quite well, too. ;)

« Reply #14 on: November 08, 2016, 00:22 »
+2
Meh. I'm always amazed at the images people license. Some of the stuff I was embarrassed to upload went on to become my best selling images.

And it doesn't matter how amazing your work is if you're being paid two cents for it.

Up with complaints and petitions!

Definitely, then there are the horrifying Frankenstein monsters masterpieces people create after they get bought. :D

SpaceStockFootage

  • Space, Sci-Fi and Astronomy Related Stock Footage

« Reply #15 on: November 08, 2016, 01:20 »
+4
A good portfolio makes good money, a bad portfolio goes empty. A bad portfolio means out-dated images which do not meet the demand of the market. The consequence would be, produce better images or leave the business and not to waste valuable time with complaints, petitions or weird accusations.

I think everyone knows that a good portfolio makes money and a bad portfolio doesn't, but that's not really the point here. People want to receive a decent commission rate for their work, whether they have a good selling portfolio or a bad selling one. Sure, the bad selling ones might be slightly more vocal, as they're making less money, but still...

So if iStock decide to drop your percentage to 10% or 5% or even 1%... you'll still be happy as can be, telling everyone that they should produce better images or leave the business and not to waste valuable time with complaints, petitions or weird accusations?

And if hell freezes over as the pigs are flying overhead when iStock increase their percentage to 20%, you'd be happy to miss out on that and stay at 15%. The thing you have to remember is that 5% more is 5% more, whether you're making $10 a month or $10,000 a month.

« Reply #16 on: November 08, 2016, 01:37 »
+4
I'm confused. What does sales volume have to do with comission rates? Would you be happy with 1% comission or even giving your work for free while the agency takes 100%? Would you complain then or no? because we are getting pretty close.

SpaceStockFootage

  • Space, Sci-Fi and Astronomy Related Stock Footage

« Reply #17 on: November 08, 2016, 02:35 »
0
I'm confused. What does sales volume have to do with comission rates? Would you be happy with 1% comission or even giving your work for free while the agency takes 100%? Would you complain then or no? because we are getting pretty close.

I'm assuming she was lumping everything together in one catch-all post... the petition, the 6 month grace period, the drop in sales etc.

gyllens

« Reply #18 on: November 08, 2016, 02:50 »
+2
Quality! cream floats to the top! etc yes we have heard that since the intro of micro 2004. Today in our business where supply outstrips demand and where quantity seems more important then quality and where we are in the hands of dubvious agencies. Sure keep on dreaming quality we have all been there and done that.

« Reply #19 on: November 08, 2016, 04:10 »
+3
What means quality to me as an illustrator?
Number one is Innovation, I have to produce new and better ideas than others.
I have to accept that I have hundred of thousands of competitors world wide.
I have to do extensive studies on present keyword trends. And I have to avoid common and boring keywords. This takes plenty of time! Its horrible, its boring, I hate it!
I have to be perfect in Adobe Illustrator.
I have to archive a very high acceptance rate.
I need good communication skills when I get in contact with agencies.
I must be addicted to the job I am doing.
I have to produce 100 images to get around 5 top sellers. Every day is a hard days work.

« Reply #20 on: November 08, 2016, 05:40 »
+3
I believe if half your posts are tearing into the quality of other people's work you should be posting a link to your portfolio.

Shelma1

« Reply #21 on: November 08, 2016, 05:55 »
+4
Yeah, I'd love to see these high-quality, original illustrations with new and innovative ideas, and uncommon and exciting (not boring) keywords.

« Reply #22 on: November 08, 2016, 10:18 »
+4
What means quality to me as an illustrator?
Number one is Innovation, I have to produce new and better ideas than others.
I have to accept that I have hundred of thousands of competitors world wide.
I have to do extensive studies on present keyword trends. And I have to avoid common and boring keywords. This takes plenty of time! Its horrible, its boring, I hate it!
I have to be perfect in Adobe Illustrator.
I have to archive a very high acceptance rate.
I need good communication skills when I get in contact with agencies.
I must be addicted to the job I am doing.
I have to produce 100 images to get around 5 top sellers. Every day is a hard days work.
And all that is pointless if the agencies don't pay enough for your work.  I know a lot of people have no reason to complain but if we all just accepted sites doing what istock have done to us, there would be no point in working hard at this.
« Last Edit: November 08, 2016, 10:21 by sharpshot »

« Reply #23 on: November 08, 2016, 11:16 »
+3
I cannot change the company policy. I can either agree or disagree like in any other business. If I am an employee and dont like my company, I better quit. If I am self employed and my customer does not pay me what I want, I better look for another opportunity.

« Reply #24 on: November 08, 2016, 11:18 »
+4
I cannot change the company policy. I can either agree or disagree like in any other business. If I am an employee and dont like my company, I better quit. If I am self employed and my customer does not pay me what I want, I better look for another opportunity.
You can always ask them for a pay rise  ;D I can't see anything wrong with that....

« Reply #25 on: November 08, 2016, 11:22 »
0
great idea I will ask Shutterstock for a pay rise

« Reply #26 on: November 08, 2016, 11:27 »
+6
I cannot change the company policy. I can either agree or disagree like in any other business. If I am an employee and dont like my company, I better quit. If I am self employed and my customer does not pay me what I want, I better look for another opportunity.

To all posters in this thread:

If Josephine believes that Innovation and creating new and better ideas has a value of .02 cents. That investing in Illustrator and being perfect in it has a value of .02 cents, then leave her to it.

To Josephine:

If you believe everyone else should simply be happy with whatever we get or quit, please stop reading threads about petitions and raises. Leave us to our belief that quality work should get fair pay.

« Reply #27 on: November 08, 2016, 11:29 »
+1
great idea I will ask Shutterstock for a pay rise
You've heard of unions I guess? Doing a petition is a bit similar. I'm not saying it will work but not everyone believes they just have to suck up whatever is given to them.

« Reply #28 on: November 08, 2016, 11:37 »
0
I cannot change the company policy. I can either agree or disagree like in any other business. If I am an employee and dont like my company, I better quit. If I am self employed and my customer does not pay me what I want, I better look for another opportunity.
There have been many times in the past when enough of us have complained and we have changed a company policy.  Ignoring problems would of made us a lot worse off and sometimes it also benefits a site, if we see problems that they haven't thought of.

« Reply #29 on: November 08, 2016, 11:40 »
+1
dont forget: "fair pay" depends on where you live.
Greetings from Zimbabwe

« Reply #30 on: November 08, 2016, 11:41 »
+2
I cannot change the company policy. I can either agree or disagree like in any other business. If I am an employee and dont like my company, I better quit. If I am self employed and my customer does not pay me what I want, I better look for another opportunity.
There have been many times in the past when enough of us have complained and we have changed a company policy.  Ignoring problems would of made us a lot worse off and sometimes it also benefits a site, if we see problems that they haven't thought of.
Indeed I'm sure many or even most of us have suggested a change to our employer that they have accepted. The idea you just leave if you don't like something is simplistic in the extreme.

« Reply #31 on: November 08, 2016, 11:54 »
+1
dont forget: "fair pay" depends on where you live.
Greetings from Zimbabwe
Now I understand.  If you come from a country that has had a $100 trillion banknote microstock sites must seem amazing.

« Reply #32 on: November 08, 2016, 11:59 »
0
thank you sharpshot, you are a real smart guy.

Shelma1

« Reply #33 on: November 08, 2016, 12:01 »
+3
Still, even if you're from Zimbabwe, why would you NOT want to make more money? Why would you be Ok with your earnings dropping? Weird.

Picone

« Reply #34 on: November 08, 2016, 12:23 »
+3
This forum has become a dangerous place. Ruled by very tough and nervous girls Shelma and Cathyslife. I'm afraid to post anything anymore  ;)

« Reply #35 on: November 08, 2016, 12:24 »
0
dont forget: "fair pay" depends on where you live.
Greetings from Zimbabwe
Now I understand.  If you come from a country that has had a $100 trillion banknote microstock sites must seem amazing.
And when you come from a country where being in a union will get you gunned down in the street it also makes you more tolerant of being treated badly by companies.

Shelma1

« Reply #36 on: November 08, 2016, 12:55 »
+2
This forum has become a dangerous place. Ruled by very tough and nervous girls Shelma and Cathyslife. I'm afraid to post anything anymore  ;)

I'm not nervous. ;)

« Reply #37 on: November 08, 2016, 13:25 »
+3
This forum has become a dangerous place. Ruled by very tough and nervous girls Shelma and Cathyslife. I'm afraid to post anything anymore  ;)

I'm not nervous. ;)

Me neither. What is funny is I haven't even posted in this thread!  ::)
« Last Edit: November 08, 2016, 13:28 by cathyslife »

Picone

« Reply #38 on: November 08, 2016, 13:27 »
+2
This forum has become a dangerous place. Ruled by very tough and nervous girls Shelma and Cathyslife. I'm afraid to post anything anymore  ;)

I'm not nervous. ;)
Molesting Zimbabweans, oh, yes, you are :D

« Reply #39 on: November 08, 2016, 13:30 »
0
This forum has become a dangerous place. Ruled by very tough and nervous girls Shelma and Cathyslife. I'm afraid to post anything anymore  ;)

I'm not nervous. ;)
Molesting Zimbabweans, oh, yes, you are :D

Yeah, OK, now I see. I think it's funny when someone is doing exactly the same thing they are accusing someone else of doing.  ::)
« Last Edit: November 08, 2016, 14:59 by cathyslife »

« Reply #40 on: November 08, 2016, 13:39 »
+1
dont forget: "fair pay" depends on where you live.
Greetings from Zimbabwe

Back on topic...you are correct. A good portion of contributors, though, come from the United States, with a higher cost of living. If petitions, etc. get higher royalties, why would you oppose that? I don't think anyone is arguing that good quality is always the goal, but providing good quality also means getting fair pay according to one's standard of living.

SpaceStockFootage

  • Space, Sci-Fi and Astronomy Related Stock Footage

« Reply #41 on: November 08, 2016, 13:42 »
+3
Christatron on a bike, this escalated quickly! Josephine... you're missing the point again. It doesn't matter where you're from, or what currency you use... 5 or 10% less or 5 or 10% more means exactly the same for everyone, no matter where they live.

But still, let us know how you get on when you ask Shutterstock for a raise, hopefully it goes well. If you're successful then I'm sure many others will follow. They will build statues and sing songs of your brilliance for many years to come.

« Reply #42 on: November 08, 2016, 13:47 »
0
Cathy, do you believe in your heart, that you will succeed in getting more money by putting your signature under a petition? Are you not afraid that you get blacklisted when you do so?

« Reply #43 on: November 08, 2016, 14:01 »
+2
Cathy, do you believe in your heart, that you will succeed in getting more money by putting your signature under a petition? Are you not afraid that you get blacklisted when you do so?

Sounds like you are suggesting that Shutterstock is a vindictive organisation, hope you are wrong they might not like being called out on a public forum.

Shelma1

« Reply #44 on: November 08, 2016, 14:06 »
+1
Almost 1,200 people have signed that petition, and I haven't heard of anyone being blacklisted. I'd be the first, since they know who wrote it and talked to me on the phone. Sales for me on SS are fine this month.

« Reply #45 on: November 08, 2016, 14:25 »
+2

...but providing good quality also means getting fair pay according to one's standard of living.

Actually no! Nobody is entitled to a certain "standard of living", nor to a higher pay because of that.
A fair pay is what the two contracting parties have free-willingly agreed to. Therefore a "fair pay" is always the market price.
If you don't consider it fair, you should be free to walk away from the contract you don't like. If enough people walk away, then the market price will be adjusted, back to the level the market will consider "fair".
« Last Edit: November 08, 2016, 14:31 by Zero Talent »

« Reply #46 on: November 08, 2016, 14:41 »
+5
This forum has become a dangerous place. Ruled by very tough and nervous girls Shelma and Cathyslife. I'm afraid to post anything anymore  ;)

What a messed up comment.  If you are so terrified of a couple of smart women speaking their mind, you should want a pay increase to cover costs of the therapy you need.

« Reply #47 on: November 08, 2016, 14:45 »
+1
zero talent, I like your point of you.
There is only one little problem, what about if there is half a million contributors around the world you expect to walk away. Will they?

« Reply #48 on: November 08, 2016, 14:52 »
+1
Cathy, do you believe in your heart, that you will succeed in getting more money by putting your signature under a petition? Are you not afraid that you get blacklisted when you do so?

Answer to the first question...I have no clue, but if it is a cause I believe in, I am willing to give it a shot. It doesn't hurt anything to try. Answer to the second question...no, I am not afraid. I have been in microstock since 2004, using my real name the whole time. When I was uploading, my sales were increasing. When I stopped uploading, they dropped, which makes perfect sense. I still make payouts from the two sites I contribute to, so no. I don't ever believe that the things I say are so heinous as to justify any "blacklisting". Guess i am just not as paranoid as some here.

« Reply #49 on: November 08, 2016, 14:57 »
+4
zero talent, I like your point of you.
There is only one little problem, what about if there is half a million contributors around the world you expect to walk away. Will they?

If they don't, it means they consider $0.02 "fair", therefore it is the new market price, like it or not.

But I'm confident a critical mass of contributors will pull out their ports or stop uploading new stuff in order to reject these insulting IS royalty proposals.
« Last Edit: November 08, 2016, 16:11 by Zero Talent »

« Reply #50 on: November 08, 2016, 14:57 »
+1

...but providing good quality also means getting fair pay according to one's standard of living.

Actually no! Nobody is entitled to a certain "standard of living", nor to a higher pay because of that.
A fair pay is what the two contracting parties have free-willingly agreed to. Therefore a "fair pay" is always the market price.
If you don't consider it fair, you should be free to walk away from the contract you don't like. If enough people walk away, then the market price will be adjusted, back to the level the market will consider "fair".

You are correct. I probably just didn't explain myself. What I meant was I personally expect "fair pay" according to my standard of living. So yes, if it doesn't meet my criteria, yes, I will walk away. Maybe 2 cents per image is OK with Josephine, according to her standard of living. And her standard of living might coincide with fair market value. It doesn't coincide with mine.

Giveme5

« Reply #51 on: November 08, 2016, 15:23 »
0
I cannot change the company policy. I can either agree or disagree like in any other business. If I am an employee and dont like my company, I better quit. If I am self employed and my customer does not pay me what I want, I better look for another opportunity.
You can always ask them for a pay rise  ;D I can't see anything wrong with that....

In today's climate they probably would shut down your account if you ask for a pay raise  :-[


« Reply #52 on: November 08, 2016, 15:36 »
+1
I cannot change the company policy. I can either agree or disagree like in any other business. If I am an employee and dont like my company, I better quit. If I am self employed and my customer does not pay me what I want, I better look for another opportunity.

What you are saying is true. But regarding being self employed (or really, employed by a company, for that matter), I would always discuss pay raises or increases in salaries with my clients/supervisors before just quitting. I think these petitions are self-employed people (contributors) discussing their disappointments with future pay and asking for increases instead. It just can't be done in person, like a typical employer/employee relationship. And a petition can gather a bunch of people at one time to voice the grievance. That number of people shows that the grievance affects a group, rather than just one disgruntled person.

k_t_g

  • Cold nectar inside!
« Reply #53 on: November 08, 2016, 16:36 »
0
This is business not art "good" means sells. Not artistic, technically difficult or expensive to produce. Although as has been said by others  I can find little pattern in what sells....that's why I'm not very successful.

Just like science, what is relevant today is mostly deemed irreverent tomorrow but in fashion another day.

« Reply #54 on: November 08, 2016, 16:40 »
+1
Checking the Top-100 Shutterstock Authors where they come from I read: Uruguay, Russia, Romania, Thailand, Azerbaijan, Ukraine, Turkey, Latvia, Belarus, Poland, India, Indonesia, Kazakhsan, Estonia, Pakistan... what does this mean to you?

Are they more talented? more creative? better motivated? better qualified? Whats their secret?
Are these countries represented in this forum?
« Last Edit: November 08, 2016, 16:56 by Josephine »

« Reply #55 on: November 08, 2016, 17:20 »
+1
Checking the Top-100 Shutterstock Authors where they come from I read: Uruguay, Russia, Romania, Thailand, Azerbaijan, Ukraine, Turkey, Latvia, Belarus, Poland, India, Indonesia, Kazakhsan, Estonia, Pakistan... what does this mean to you?

Are they more talented? more creative? better motivated? better qualified? Whats their secret?
Are these countries represented in this forum?
Their production costs are probably lower making it more profitable to make images that include models and microstock probably has higher returns in those countries than other forms of income such as wedding photography etc which in wealthier countries is much more lucrative . In any event they are only top in terms of sales you don't know profitable they are.
« Last Edit: November 08, 2016, 17:33 by Pauws99 »

Shelma1

« Reply #56 on: November 08, 2016, 17:49 »
0
Checking the Top-100 Shutterstock Authors where they come from I read: Uruguay, Russia, Romania, Thailand, Azerbaijan, Ukraine, Turkey, Latvia, Belarus, Poland, India, Indonesia, Kazakhsan, Estonia, Pakistan... what does this mean to you?

Are they more talented? more creative? better motivated? better qualified? Whats their secret?
Are these countries represented in this forum?

Where are you checking them? What's your source for the top 100?

« Reply #57 on: November 08, 2016, 18:00 »
+2
http://www.microstock.top/ Maybe this? But that's only volume not a measure of  "quality" that started this all off.

« Reply #58 on: November 08, 2016, 18:05 »
+1
Checking the Top-100 Shutterstock Authors where they come from I read: Uruguay, Russia, Romania, Thailand, Azerbaijan, Ukraine, Turkey, Latvia, Belarus, Poland, India, Indonesia, Kazakhsan, Estonia, Pakistan... what does this mean to you?

Are they more talented? more creative? better motivated? better qualified? Whats their secret?
Are these countries represented in this forum?


Where are you checking them? What's your source for the top 100?


http://www.microstock.top/

This by portfolio size

« Reply #59 on: November 08, 2016, 18:33 »
+1
Checking the Top-100 Shutterstock Authors where they come from I read: Uruguay, Russia, Romania, Thailand, Azerbaijan, Ukraine, Turkey, Latvia, Belarus, Poland, India, Indonesia, Kazakhsan, Estonia, Pakistan... what does this mean to you?

Are they more talented? more creative? better motivated? better qualified? Whats their secret?
Are these countries represented in this forum?

It means hard work knows no boundary's, and that is no secret.

If they are Shutterstock's top earners it's likely that they have been muzzled by the Terms and Conditions of Premier Select, but I for one would welcome them to this forum.  Tonight though, they will be sweating on the Election result, because if Trump gets in they could find themselves sanctioned out of business.

Rose Tinted Glasses

« Reply #60 on: November 08, 2016, 18:36 »
+3
funny list. #82 and #169 have the same portfolio. thai style, cheat the system and upload identical images as a different user name and double dip.

Shelma1

« Reply #61 on: November 08, 2016, 18:40 »
+1
http://www.microstock.top/ Maybe this? But that's only volume not a measure of  "quality" that started this all off.


Not only is volume not a measure of quality, 4 of the top 10 contributors in terms of volume are from the U.K., Ireland, Australia and the U.S. So I'm not sure what her point is if that's her source.

« Reply #62 on: November 09, 2016, 05:49 »
0
funny list. #82 and #169 have the same portfolio. thai style, cheat the system and upload identical images as a different user name and double dip.
More evidence of poor quality control by SS but if it gets their image count up do they care!? Having had a quick look of some of those portfolios putting them in a thread about "quality" is laughable more like if you throw enough er dirt at the wall some might stick.

Tror

« Reply #63 on: November 09, 2016, 05:53 »
+2
I believe in Santa Claus  8)

Or in other words > Microstock is like Democracy: you can have a very elaborate, developed and wise concept, but if the majority of your customers/citizens are not capable of understanding that and prefer to take the mental shortcut, you are better off with offering low level / high impact products / concepts :-)

« Reply #64 on: November 09, 2016, 06:11 »
+2
I believe in Santa Claus  8)

Or in other words > Microstock is like Democracy: you can have a very elaborate, developed and wise concept, but if the majority of your customers/citizens are not capable of understanding that and prefer to take the mental shortcut, you are better off with offering low level / high impact products / concepts :-)
What YOU or I think is quality is irrelevant customer perception is king. Its about "fit for purpose" not hanging great art on the wall

Tror

« Reply #65 on: November 09, 2016, 06:22 »
0
I believe in Santa Claus  8)

Or in other words > Microstock is like Democracy: you can have a very elaborate, developed and wise concept, but if the majority of your customers/citizens are not capable of understanding that and prefer to take the mental shortcut, you are better off with offering low level / high impact products / concepts :-)
What YOU or I think is quality is irrelevant customer perception is king. Its about "fit for purpose" not hanging great art on the wall

And we all try to find out best what customers need :-)

The point is that "Quality" cannot be easily defined anymore as such.

In the past e.g. we tried to focus on technical Quality to e.g. satisfy high res/gloss prints. Nowadays it seems to be not so relevant anymore since most of the publishing switched to the web.

Nowadays I prefer a strong composition / mood design instead of high photographic Quality in a technical sense.

PureArt

  • UK
« Reply #66 on: November 09, 2016, 06:35 »
+1
... do you believe in your heart, that you will succeed in getting more money by putting your signature under a petition? ...

Why not try?! If you do nothing (do not sign the petition) the result is predictable (and not acceptable). If you do something it may become better.

Sometimes we must send a message to microstock agencies just to remind them we exist and we are real people, not just the numbers.

« Reply #67 on: November 09, 2016, 06:35 »
+1
"The late American Management guru Peter F. Drucker said, Quality in a product or service is not what the supplier puts in. It is what the customer gets out and is willing to pay for.

Customers judge quality through their perceptions. This makes measuring customer satisfaction difficult because customers cannot clearly specify in numeric values what makes them satisfied. Yet quality is delivered when you achieve the minimum requirement of a specified performance standard. Over the years business has had to find a way to define and measure quality so that companies can make products and deliver services to definable standards their customers will accept." (not my words but sums it up I think)  From a business perspective its not about "excellence" as it might be when we give the word its everyday meaning. I rather suspect that photographers and microstock sites (in the past anyway) were always more concerned about technical excellence than the customer ever was. Though what complicates it is the same image might be used for a throwaway web blog or a massive bill board.

alno

« Reply #68 on: November 09, 2016, 17:46 »
0
Checking the Top-100 Shutterstock Authors where they come from I read: Uruguay, Russia, Romania, Thailand, Azerbaijan, Ukraine, Turkey, Latvia, Belarus, Poland, India, Indonesia, Kazakhsan, Estonia, Pakistan... what does this mean to you?

Are they more talented? more creative? better motivated? better qualified? Whats their secret?
Are these countries represented in this forum?

I'm from Russia and I'm "better motivated" because stock sites now is real opportunity to get more money then working in f**d up industry I used to. The secret of those countries is too obvious, they have poor average salaries and still good internet access in general.

« Reply #69 on: November 10, 2016, 09:38 »
0
thank you Irena, I am very happy to read your comment.

Living in Africa the microstock business gives me a tiny piece of paradise on earth, for me and my entire family. This boosts my motivation to compete and to be better than others. Some of the comments in this forum let me think about evil eyes when it comes to contributors in "poor countries" with "low standard ov living", who spoil the market of the people in the rich countries.

« Reply #70 on: November 10, 2016, 16:13 »
0
thank you Irena, I am very happy to read your comment.

Living in Africa the microstock business gives me a tiny piece of paradise on earth, for me and my entire family. This boosts my motivation to compete and to be better than others. Some of the comments in this forum let me think about evil eyes when it comes to contributors in "poor countries" with "low standard ov living", who spoil the market of the people in the rich countries.
I don't always agree with your comments but I am pleased this works well for you. Sometimes those of us in wealthier countries forget how fortunate we are.


 

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